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Encyclopedia > Pope Paul IV
Paul IV
Birth name Giovanni Pietro Carafa
Papacy began May 26, 1555
Papacy ended August 18, 1559
Predecessor Marcellus II
Successor Pius IV
Born June 28, 1476
Capriglia Irpina, Italy
Died August 18, 1559 (aged 83)
Rome, Italy
Other popes named Paul

Pope Paul IV (June 28, 1476August 18, 1559), né Giovanni Pietro Carafa, was Pope from May 23, 1555 until his death. Pope Paul IV From a website: http://papal-library. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Marcellus II, né Marcello Cervini degli Spannochi (May 6, 1501 – May 1, 1555), cardinal of Santa Croce, a native of the area of Ancona, Italy, was elected pope to succeed Julius III on April 9, 1555. ... Pius IV, né Giovanni Angelo Medici (March 31, 1499 – December 9, 1565), pope from 1559 to 1565, was born of humble parentage in Milan, unrelated with the Medicis of Florence. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 2 - Battle of Grandson. ... Capriglia Irpina is a town (commune) in the province of Avellino, Campania, Italy. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Pope Paul has been the name of six Roman Catholic Popes: Pope Paul I (757–767) Pope Paul II (1464–1471) Pope Paul III Pope Paul IV Pope Paul V Pope Paul VI See also: Pope John Paul I and Pope John Paul II This is a disambiguation page — a... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 2 - Battle of Grandson. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ...


Biography

Known as the Father of the Roman Inquisition, Giovanni Pietro Carafa was born in Capriglia Irpina, near Avellino, into a prominent noble family of Naples. His title in the Prophecy of St. Malachy is "Of the Faith of Peter." He was mentored by Cardinal Oliviero Carafa, his relative, who resigned the see of Chieti (Latin Theate) in his favor. Under the direction of Pope Leo X, he was ambassador to England and then papal nuncio in Spain, where he conceived a violent detestation of Spanish rule that affected the policies of his later papacy. The Roman Inquisition began in 1542 when Pope Paul III established the Holy Office as the final court of appeal in trials of heresy and served as an important part of the Counter-Reformation. ... Capriglia Irpina is a town (commune) in the province of Avellino, Campania, Italy. ... Avellino is a town and comune, capital of the province of Avellino in the Campania region of southern Italy. ... For other uses see, Naples (disambiguation) and Napoli (disambiguation) Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Papal Emblem The Prophecy of the Popes, attributed to Saint Malachy, is a list of 112 short phrases in Latin. ... Oliviero Carafa (1430 - 20 January 1511) was an Italian Cardinal and diplomat of the Renaissance. ... Look up see in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chieti is a city in central Italy, 200 km northeast of Rome. ... Pope Leo X, born Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (11 December 1475 – 1 December 1521) was Pope from 1513 to his death. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Nuncio is an ecclesiastical diplomatic title, derived from the ancient Latin Nuntius, meaning any envoy. ...


However, in 1524, Pope Clement VII allowed Carafa to resign his benefices and join the ascetic order of Saint Cajetan, popularly called the Theatines, after Cardinal Carafa, bishop of Theate. Following the sack of Rome in 1527, the order moved to Venice. But Carafa was recalled to Rome by the reform-minded Pope Paul III (1534–49), to sit on a committee of reform of the papal court, an appointment that forecast an end to a humanist papacy, and a revival of scholasticism, for Carafa was a thorough disciple of Thomas Aquinas. In December 1536 he was made a cardinal and then Archbishop of Naples. He reorganized the Inquisition in Italy. Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... For the antipope (1378–1394) see antipope Clement VII and other Popes named Clement see Pope Clement. ... Originally a benefice was a gift of land for life as a reward (Latin beneficium, means to do well) for services rendered. ... The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ... A Taoist monk playing an instrument. ... For the cardinal, see Thomas Cardinal Cajetan. ... The Theatines or the Congregation of Clerks Regular of the Divine Providence are a male religious order of the Catholic Church, with the post-nominal initials C.R. // The order was founded by Saint Cajetan (Gaetano dei Conti di Tiene), Paolo Consiglieri, Bonifacio da Colle, and Giovanni Pietro Carafa (afterwards... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope from 1534 to 1549. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... Scholasticism comes from the Latin word scholasticus, which means that [which] belongs to the school, and is the school of philosophy taught by the academics (or schoolmen) of medieval universities circa 1100–1500. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Year 1536 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The coat of arms of a Cardinal are indicated by a red galero (wide-brimmed hat) with 15 tassels on each side (the motto and escutcheon are proper to the individual Cardinal). ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... For other uses see, Naples (disambiguation) and Napoli (disambiguation) Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Inquisition (capitalized I) is broadly used, to refer to things related to judgment of heresy by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


He was a surprise choice as Pope to succeed Pope Marcellus II (1555); his rigid, severe and unbending character combined with his age and patriotism meant he would have declined the honor. He accepted apparently because Emperor Charles V was opposed to his accession. As Pope his nationalism was a driving force, he used the office to preserve some liberties in the face of four-fold foreign occupation. The Habsburgs disliked Paul IV and he allied with France, possibly against the true interests of the Papacy. He also alienated Protestants in England and rejected the claim of Elizabeth I of England to the Crown. The strengthening of the Inquisition continued and Paul IV's rectitude meant that few could consider themselves safe by virtue of position in his drive to reform the Church; even cardinals he disliked could be imprisoned. Marcellus II, né Marcello Cervini degli Spannochi (May 6, 1501 – May 1, 1555), cardinal of Santa Croce, a native of the area of Ancona, Italy, was elected pope to succeed Julius III on April 9, 1555. ... Charles (February 24, 1500 – September 21, 1558) was Holy Roman Emperor (as Charles V) from 1519-1558; he was also King of Spain from 1516-1556, officially as Charles I of Spain, although often referred to as Charles V (Carlos Quinto or Carlos V) in Spain and Latin America. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ...


Paul IV believed in extra ecclesiam nulla salus. In 1555 he issued a canon (papal law), Cum nimis absurdum, by which the Roman Ghetto was created; Jews were then forced to live in seclusion in a specified area of the rione Sant'Angelo, locked in at night, and he decreed that Jews should wear a distinctive sign, yellow hats for men and veils or shawls for women. The following Popes would have enforced the creation of other ghettos in most Italian towns. Under conservative pressure from Pope Pius IX (1846–78), the Roman ghetto was the last ghetto to be abolished in Western Europe. The Latin phrase Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus, meaning: Outside the Church there is no salvation, is a dogma of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Events Russia breaks 60 year old truce with Sweden by attacking Finland February 2 - Diet of Augsburg begins February 4 - John Rogers becomes first Protestant martyr in England February 9 - Bishop of Gloucester John Hooper is burned at the stake May 23 - Paul IV becomes Pope. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Canon law is the term used for... Cum nimis absurdum was a papal bull issued by Pope Paul IV dated July 14, 1555 and taking its name from its first words, translated1 Since it is absurd and utterly inconvenient that the Jews, who through their own fault were condemned by God to eternal slavery . ... The Roman Ghetto was located in the area surrounded by todays Via del Portico dOttavia, Lungotevere dei Cenci, Via del Progresso and Via di Santa Maria del Pianto close to the Tiber and the Theatre of Marcellus, in Rome, Italy. ... A map of the center of Rome with its rioni The word rione (pl. ... Logo of the rione SantAngelo is the XI rione of Rome. ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background live as a group in seclusion, voluntarily or involuntarily. ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ...


Paul IV was violently opposed to the liberal Giovanni Cardinal Morone whom he strongly suspected of being a hidden Protestant, so much that he had him imprisoned. In order to prevent Morone from succeeding him and imposing what he believed to be his Protestant beliefs on the Church, Pope Paul IV codified the Catholic Law excluding heretics and non-Catholics from receiving or legitimately becoming Pope, in the bull Cum ex apostolatus officio. Giovanni Morone (25th January 1509 - 1st December 1580) was an Italian cardinal born in Milan, where his father, Count leronimo Morone (d. ... Cum ex Apostolatus Officio is the name of a papal bull issued by Pope Paul IV on February 15, 1559, as a codification or explicitation of the ancient Catholic law that only Catholics can be elected Popes, to the exclusion of non-Catholics, including former Catholics who have become public...


Paul IV introduced the Index Librorum Prohibitorum or "Index of Prohibited Books" to Venice, then an independent and prosperous trading state in order to crack down on the growing threat of Protestanism and the newly introduced printing press. Under his authority all books written by Protestants were banned together with Italian and German translations of the Latin Bible. Venetiis, M. D. LXIIII. The Index Librorum Prohibitorum (List of Prohibited Books) is a list of publications which the Catholic Church censored for being a danger to itself and the faith of its members. ...


As was usual with Renaissance popes, Paul IV sought to advance the fortunes of his family as well as that of the papacy. As Cardinal-nephew, Carlo Carafa became his uncle's chief adviser and the prime mover in their plans to ally with the French to expel the Spanish from Italy. Carlo's older brother Giovanni was made commander of the papal forces and Duke of Paliano after the pro-Spanish Colonna were deprived of that town in 1556. Another nephew, Antonio, was given command of the Papal guard and made Marquis of Montebello. Their conduct became notorious in Rome. However at the conclusion of the disastrous war with Philip II of Spain and after many scandals, in 1559 the Pope publicly disgraced his nephews and banished them from Rome. Pietro Ottoboni, the last Cardinal Nephew, painted by Francesco Trevisani A cardinal-nephew (Latin: cardinalis nepos;[1] Italian: cardinale nipote;[2] Spanish: valido de su tío; French: le prince de la fortune)[3] is a cardinal elevated by a pope who is his uncle, or more generally, his relative. ... Pope Paul IV (June 28, 1476 – August 18, 1559), né Giovanni Pietro Carafa, was Pope from May 23, 1555 until his death. ... Giovanni Carafa (died 5 March 1561), Duke of Paliano, was a papal nephew and minor Italian prince. ... The title Duke and Prince of Paliano is borne by the head of the Colonna di Paliano family. ... Crest of the Colonna family. ... Philip II (Spanish: Felipe II de Habsburgo; Portuguese: Filipe I) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was the first official King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ...


He was buried in St. Peter's Basilica but was later transferred to Santa Maria sopra Minerva. The Basilica of Saint Peter, officially known in Italian as the Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly called Saint Peters Basilica, is one of four major basilicas of Rome (St. ... Facade of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. ...

Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Pope Paul IV
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Marcellus II
Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Peter (deprecated A.D. 495), Vicar of Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles
Supreme Pontiff (Pontifex Maximus)
Patriarch of the West (deprecated 2006), Primate of Italy,
Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province
Servant of the Servants of God
Pope

1555–59
Succeeded by
Pius IV

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Paul IV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (623 words)
Under the direction of Pope Leo X (1513–21) he was ambassador to England and then papal nuncio in Spain, where he conceived a violent detestation of Spanish rule that affected the policies of his later papacy.
But Carafa was recalled to Rome by the reform-minded Pope Paul III (1534–49), to sit on a committee of reform of the papal court, an appointment that forecast an end to a humanist papacy, and a revival of scholasticism, for Carafa was a thorough disciple of Thomas Aquinas.
Paul IV was violently opposed to the liberal Giovanni Cardinal Morone whom he strongly suspected of being a hidden Protestant, so much that he had him imprisoned.
Pope Paul IV (872 words)
Paul IV elevated to the cardinalate his nephew Carlo Caraffa, a man utterly unworthy and without any ecclesiastical training, and enriched other relatives with benefices and estates taken from those who favoured the Spaniards.
Paul IV refused to sanction Pole's settlement in regard to the confiscated goods of the Church, and demanded restitution.
Paul established the hierarchy in the Netherlands and in the Orient.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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