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Encyclopedia > Pope Nicholas V
Nicholas V
Birth name Tomaso Parentucelli
Papacy began 6 March 1447
Papacy ended 24 March 1455
Predecessor Eugenius IV
Successor Callistus III
Born 15 November 1397
Sarzana, Liguria, Italy
Died 24 March 1455
Rome
{{{footnotes}}}

Nicholas V, né Tomaso Parentucelli (November 15, 1397March 24, 1455) was Pope from March 6, 1447, to his death. Image File history File links H.H. Pope Nicholas V This image of a postage stamp may be copyrighted and/or have other restrictions on its reproduction imposed by the issuing authority. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Events March 6 - Nicholas V becomes Pope. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in Leap years). ... // Events February 9 - Wars of the Roses: Richard, Duke of York dismissed as Protector February 23 - Johannes Gutenberg prints the first Bible on a printing press May 22 - Wars of the Roses: First Battle of St Albans - Richard, Duke of York and his ally, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick defeat... Eugene IV, né Gabriele Condulmer (1383 – February 23, 1447) was Pope from March 3, 1431 to his death. ... Calistus and Calixtus III redirect here. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... Events February 10 - John Beaufort becomes Earl of Somerset. ... Sarzana is a town and episcopal see of Liguria, Italy, in, the Province of Genoa, 9 miles east of Spezia, on the railway to Pisa, at the point where the railway to Parma diverges to the north, 59 ft. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in Leap years). ... // Events February 9 - Wars of the Roses: Richard, Duke of York dismissed as Protector February 23 - Johannes Gutenberg prints the first Bible on a printing press May 22 - Wars of the Roses: First Battle of St Albans - Richard, Duke of York and his ally, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick defeat... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... Events February 10 - John Beaufort becomes Earl of Somerset. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in Leap years). ... // Events February 9 - Wars of the Roses: Richard, Duke of York dismissed as Protector February 23 - Johannes Gutenberg prints the first Bible on a printing press May 22 - Wars of the Roses: First Battle of St Albans - Richard, Duke of York and his ally, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick defeat... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the head of the Catholic Church, which considers him the successor of St. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Events March 6 - Nicholas V becomes Pope. ...


He was born at Sarzana, Liguria, where his father was a physician. His father died while he was young, but in Florence, Parentucelli became a tutor in the families of the Strozzi and Albizzi, where he made the acquaintance of the leading humanist scholars. He studied at Bologna, gaining a degree in theology in 1422, whereupon the bishop, Nicholas Albergati, was so much struck with his capacities that he took him into his service and gave him the chance to pursue his studies further, by sending him on a tour through Germany, France and England. He was able to collect books, for which he had an intellectual's passion, wherever he went. Some of them survive, with his marginal annotations. Sarzana is a town and episcopal see of Liguria, Italy, in, the Province of Genoa, 9 miles east of Spezia, on the railway to Pisa, at the point where the railway to Parma diverges to the north, 59 ft. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... Founded 59 BC as Florentia Region Tuscany Mayor Leonardo Domenici (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  102 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 356,000 almost 500,000 3,453/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 43°47 N 11°15 E www. ... Strozzi, the name of an ancient and noble Florentine family, which was already famous in the 14th century. ... The Albizzi family was a Florentine family based in Arezzo and rivals of the Medici and Alberti families. ... Humanism is a system of thought that defines a socio-political doctrine (-ism) whose bounds exceed those of locally developed cultures, to include all of humanity and all issues common to human beings. ... Bologna (pronounced , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in the local dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, between the Po River and the Apennines. ... Events August 31 - Henry VI becomes King of England. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st...


He distinguished himself at the Council of Ferrara-Florence, and in 1444, when his patron died, he was appointed bishop of Bologna in his place. Civic disorders at Bologna were prolonged, so Pope Eugene IV (1431–47) soon named him as one of the legates sent to Frankfurt to negotiate an understanding between the Holy See and the Holy Roman Empire, with regard to undercutting or at least containing the reforming decrees of the Council of Basel. His successful diplomacy gained him the reward, on his return to Rome, of the title of Cardinal priest of Santa Susanna (December 1446). He was elected Pope in succession to Eugene IV on 6 March of the following year, taking the name of Nicholas V in honour of his early benefactor. A decree of the Council of Constance (9 October 1417), sanctioned by Pope Martin V obliged the papacy to summon general councils periodically. ... Events March 1 - Gjergj Kastriot Skanderbeg proclaimed commander of the Albanian resistance April 16 - Truce of Tours. ... Bologna (pronounced , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in the local dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, between the Po River and the Apennines. ... Eugenius IV, né Gabriel Condulmer (1383 - February 23, 1447) was pope from March 3, 1431 to his death. ... Frankfurt am Main [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hessen and the fifth largest city of Germany. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... The Council of Basel was a council of bishops and other ecclesiastics of the Roman Catholic Church that was held at Basel, Switzerland. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... Cardinal Priests are the most numerous of the three orders of Cardinals in the Roman Catholic Church. ... Baroque façade of Santa Susanna, by Carlo Maderno (1603). ... Events Mehmed II Sultan of the Ottoman Empire is forced to abdicate in favor of his father Murad II by the Janissaries. ...


The eight scant years of his pontificate were important in the political, scientific and literary history of the world. Politically, he made the Concordat of Vienna, or Aschaffenburg (February 17, 1448) with the German King, Frederick III (1440–93), by which the decrees of the Council of Basel against papal annates and reservations were abrogated so far as Germany was concerned; and in the following year he secured a still greater tactical triumph, when the resignation of the antipope Felix V (1439–49) (7 April) and his own recognition by the rump of the council of Basel (1431–39), assembled at Lausanne, put an end to the Western Schism (1378–1417). The next year, 1450, Nicholas V held a jubilee at Rome; and the offerings of the numerous pilgrims who thronged to Rome gave him the means of furthering the cause of culture in Italy, which he had so much at heart. In March 1452 he crowned Frederick III as Emperor in St. Peter's, the last occasion of the coronation of an Emperor at Rome. February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ... Detail of Aeneas Piccolomini Introduces Eleonora of Portugal to Frederick III by Pinturicchio (1454-1513) Frederick III of Habsburg (Innsbruck, September 21, 1415 – August 19, 1493 in Linz) was elected as German King as the successor of Albert II in 1440. ... Annates is money paid by Catholic clergy to the pope, and is essentially a tax on the first years income from a benefice. ... Amadeus VIII (1383 - November 7, 1451), surnamed the Peaceful was the Count of Savoy from 1391 to 1416 and the Duke of Savoy from 1416 to 1440. ... Lausanne (, ) is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France). ... Historical map of the Western Schism The Western Schism or Papal Schism (Also known as the Great Schism of Western Christianity) was a split within the Catholic Church in 1378. ... Events March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen April 15 - Battle of Formigny. ... The Jubilee in both the Jewish and Christian traditions is a year of celebration and forgiveness originally held every 50 years. ... Events October - English troops under John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, land in Guyenne, France, and retake most of the province without a fight. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Basilica in the back St. ... An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ...


Within the city of Rome, Nicholas V introduced the fresh spirit of the Renaissance. His plans were of embellishing the city with new monuments worthy of the capital of the Christian world. His first care was practical, to reinforce the city's fortifications, cleaning and even paving some main streets and restoring the water supply. The end of ancient Rome is sometimes dated from the destruction of its magnificent array of aqueducts by 6th century invaders. In the Middle Ages Romans depended for water on wells and cisterns, and the poor dipped their water from the yellow Tiber. The Aqua Virgo aqueduct, originally constructed by Agrippa, was restored by Pope Nicholas V, and emptied into a simple basin that Leon Battista Alberti designed, the predecessor of the Trevi Fountain. In the traditional view, the Renaissance is understood as an historical age that was preceded by the Middle Ages and followed by the Reformation. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs of... The Aqua Virgo (also known as the Acqua Vergine) was one of the 11 aqueducts that supplied the city of ancient Rome, Italy. ... Pont du Gard, France, a Roman era aqueduct circa 19 BC. It is one of Frances top tourist attractions at over 1. ... Agrippa may refer to: Menenius Agrippa, a Roman consul in 503 BC. Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (63–12 BC), Roman statesman and general, friend of Augustus Caesar. ... Leone Battista Alberti (February 1404 - 25th April 1472), Italian painter, poet, linguist, philosopher, cryptographer, musician, architect, and general Renaissance polymath . ... Fontana di Trevi (Roma) The Trevi Fountain (in Italian, Fontana di Trevi) is the largest (standing 85 feet high and 65 feet wide) and most ambitious of the Baroque fountains of Rome. ...


But the works on which he especially set his heart were the rebuilding of the Vatican, and St Peter's Basilica, where the reborn glories of the papacy were to be focused. He got as far as pulling down part of the ancient basilica, and made some alterations to the Lateran Palace (of which some frescos by Fra Angelico bear witness). Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... The Lateran Palace, sometimes more formally known as the Palace of the Lateran, is an ancient palace of the Roman Empire and later a Palace of the Popes. ... Il Beato Fra Giovanni Angelico da Fiesole (the Beatified Friar John the Angelic of Fiesole) (Vicchio di Mugello, Florence 1395 – Rome February 18, 1455), better known in the English-speaking world as Fra Angelico (the Angelic Friar), or in Continental Europe as Beato Angelico (the Blessed Angelic One) was a...


Under the generous patronage of Nicholas V, humanism made rapid strides as well. The new humanist learning had been looked on with suspicion in Rome, a possible source of schism and heresy, an unhealthy interest in paganism. Nicholas V instead employed Lorenzo Valla as a notary and kept hundreds (confirm; this seems high) of copyists and scholars, with the special aim of wholesale translations of Greek works, pagan as well as Christian, into Latin, giving as much as ten thousand gulden for a metrical translation of Homer. This industry, coming just before the dawn of printing, contributed enormously to the sudden expansion of the intellectual horizon. Nicholas V founded a library of nine thousand volumes. The Pope himself was a man of vast erudition, and his friend Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini, later Pope Pius II (1458–64), said of him that "what he does not know is outside the range of human knowledge". Humanism is a broad category of active ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on our ability to determine what is right using the qualities innate to humanity, particularly rationality. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... Lorenzo (or Laurentius) Valla (Rome, c. ... An Embossed Notary Seal A notary public is an officer who can administer and give oaths, and perform certain other acts varying from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The guilder (Dutch gulden), represented by the symbol ƒ, was the name of the currency used in the Netherlands from the 15th century until 1999, when it was replaced by the euro (coins and notes were not introduced until 2002). ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For the fictional character in The Simpsons, see Homer Simpson. ... The folder of newspaper web offset printing press Printing is a process for production of texts and images, typically with ink on paper using a printing press. ... Pius II, né Enea Silvio Piccolomini, in Latin Aeneas Sylvius (October 18, 1405 – August 14, 1464) was Pope from 1458 until his death. ...


He was compelled, however, to add that the lustre of his pontificate would be forever dulled by the fall of Constantinople, which the Turks took in 1453. The Pope bitterly felt this catastrophe as a double blow to Christendom and to Greek letters. "It is a second death," wrote Aeneas Silvius, "to Homer and Plato". Nicholas V preached a crusade, and endeavoured to reconcile the mutual animosities of the Italian states, but without much success. He did not live long enough to see the effect of the Greek scholars armed with unimagined manuscripts, who began to find their way to Italy. Combatants Byzantine Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Constantine XI† Mehmed II Strength 7,000 100,000 Casualties Entire garrison killed or captured Unknown, but heavy The Fall of Constantinople was the conquest of the Byzantine capital by the Ottoman Empire under the command of Sultan Mehmed II, on Tuesday, May 29... Events May 29 - Fall of Constantinople to Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror, marking the end of the Byzantine Empire (Eastern Roman Empire). ... This medieval map, which abstracts the known world to a cross inscribed within an orb, remakes geography in the service of Christian iconography. ... At the moment this page contains a list of links. ... Plato Plato (Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn) (c. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ...


In undertaking these works Nicholas V was moved "to strengthen the weak faith of the populace by the greatness of that which it sees". The Roman populace, however, appreciated neither his motives nor their results, and in 1452 a formidable conspiracy for the overthrow of the papal government, under the leadership of Stefano Porcaro, was discovered and crushed. This revelation of disaffection, together with the fall of Constantinople, darkened the last years of Pope Nicholas V; "As Thomas of Sarzana," he said, "I had more happiness in a day than now in a whole year". Events October - English troops under John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, land in Guyenne, France, and retake most of the province without a fight. ...

Preceded by:
Eugene IV
Pope
1447–55
Succeeded by:
Calixtus III

There was also an antipope with the name Nicholas V from 1328 to 1330. Eugenius IV, né Gabriel Condulmer (1383 - February 23, 1447) was pope from March 3, 1431 to his death. ... Popes buried in St. ... Callixtus III, né Alphonso de Borgia (December 31, 1378 - August 6, 1458) was born in Xàtiva, Valencia, Spain and was pope from April 8, 1455 to August 6, 1458. ... Antipope Felix V, the last historical Antipope. ... Nicholas V, Pietro Rainalducci († October 16, 1333) was an antipope in Italy from May 12, 1328 to July 25, 1330 during the pontificate of Pope John XXII at Avignon. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... Events The Bulgars under Michael III are beaten by the Serbs at Velbuzhd, and large parts of Bulgaria fall to Serbia. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Nicholas V - definition of Pope Nicholas V in Encyclopedia (926 words)
Nicholas V, né Tomaso Parentucelli (November 15, 1397–March 24, 1455) was pope from March 6, 1447, to March 24, 1455.
Civic disorders at Bologna were prolonged, so Pope Eugenius IV soon named him as one of the legates sent to Frankfort to negotiate an understanding between the Holy See and the Holy Roman Empire, with regard to undercutting or at least containing the reforming decrees of the Council of Basel.
Nicholas himself was a man of vast erudition, and his friend Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini (later Pope Pius II) said of him that "what he does not know is outside the range of human knowledge".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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