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Encyclopedia > Pope Leo IX
Leo IX
Birth name Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg
Papacy began February 12, 1049
Papacy ended April 19, 1054
Predecessor Damasus II
Successor Victor II
Born June 21, 1002
Eguisheim, Alsace
Died April 19, 1054
Rome, Italy

Leo IX, born Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (June 21, 1002April 19, 1054) was Pope from February 12, 1049 to his death. Image File history File links H.H. Pope Saint Leo IX File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Leo IX becomes pope. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... Damasus II, né Poppo (died August 9, 1048), Pope from July 17, 1048 to August 9, 1048, was the second of the German pontiffs nominated by Emperor Henry III (1039–56). ... Victor II, né Gebhard, Count of Calw, Tollenstein, and Hirschnerg (c. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... Events November 13 - English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. ... A window in Eguisheim, with an inscription in Alsatian Eguisheim is a commune in the Haut-Rhin département of Alsace, France. ... Capital Strasbourg Land area¹ 8,280 km² Regional President Adrien Zeller (UMP) (since 1996) Population  - Jan. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... This is the current Article Improvement Drive collaboration! CAST YOUR VOTE for next weeks article For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... Events November 13 - English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the head of the Catholic Church. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Leo IX becomes pope. ...


He was a native of Eguisheim, Upper Alsace. The family to which he belonged was of noble rank, and his father Count Hugo was a relative of Emperor Conrad II (1024–39). He was educated at Toul, where he successively became canon and, in 1026, bishop; in the latter capacity he rendered important political services to his relative Conrad II, and afterwards to Emperor Henry III (1039–56), and at the same time he became widely known as an earnest and reforming ecclesiastic by the zeal he showed in spreading the rule of the order of Cluny. A window in Eguisheim, with an inscription in Alsatian Eguisheim is a commune in the Haut-Rhin département of Alsace, France. ... Capital Strasbourg Land area¹ 8,280 km² Regional President Adrien Zeller (UMP) (since 1996) Population  - Jan. ... Conrad II (circa 990 - June 4, 1039) was the son of count Henry of Speyer. ... Cathédrale Saint-Étienne de Toul Toul is a historic fortified town of France, a sous-préfecture of the Meurthe-et-Moselle département. ... A canon (from the Latin canonicus and Greek κανωνικωσ relating to a rule) is a priest who is a member of certain bodies of the Christian clergy subject to a rule (canon). ... Events Archbishop Ariberto crowns Conrad II King of Italy in Milan. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Rulers with the title Henry III include: Henry III of Champagne Henry III of England Henry III of France Henry III of Germany (later Henry II, Holy Roman Emperor) Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor Henry III of Navarre (later Henry IV of France) Henry III, Duke of Saxony (Henry the... Cluny nowadays The town of Cluny or Clugny lies in the modern-day département of Saône-et-Loire in the région of France, near Mâcon. ...


On the death of Pope Damasus II (1048), Bruno was selected his successor by an assembly at Worms in December 1048. Both the Emperor and the Roman delegates concurred. However, Bruno apparently favored democracy as a means of Papal election, as he stipulated as a condition of his acceptance that he should first proceed to Rome and be canonically elected by the voice of clergy and people. Setting out shortly after Christmas, he met with abbot Hugo of Cluny at Besancon, where he was joined by the young monk Hildebrand, who afterwards became Pope Gregory VII (1073–85); arriving in pilgrim garb at Rome in the following February, he was received with much cordiality, and at his consecration assumed the name of Leo IX. Damasus II, né Poppo (died August 9, 1048), Pope from July 17, 1048 to August 9, 1048, was the second of the German pontiffs nominated by Emperor Henry III (1039–56). ... // Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ... Events The city of Oslo is founded by Harald Hardråde of Norway. ... Besan on is a French city, in the d partement of Doubs, of which it is the pr fecture. ... Gregory VII, born Hildebrand (c. ...


Leo IX favored traditional morality in his reformation of the Catholic Church. One of his first public acts was to hold the well-known Easter synod of 1049, at which celibacy of the clergy (down to the rank of subdeacon) was required anew. Also, the Easter synod was where the Pope at least succeeded in making clear his own convictions against every kind of simony. The greater part of the year that followed was occupied in one of those progresses through Italy, Germany, and France which form a marked feature in Leo IX's pontificate. After presiding over a synod at Pavia, he joined Henry III in Saxony, and accompanied him to Cologne and Aachen; to Reims he also summoned a meeting of the higher clergy, by which several important reforming decrees were passed. At Mainz also he held a council, at which the Italian and French as well as the German clergy were represented, and ambassadors of the Greek emperor were present; here too simony and the marriage of the clergy were the principal matters dealt with. This article is about the Christian festival. ... Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity. ... Simony is the ecclesiastical crime and personal sin of paying for offices or positions in the hierarchy of a church, named after Simon Magus, who appears in the Acts of the Apostles 8:18-24. ... Church San Michele in Pavia The Old Bridge (Ponte Vecchio) on the Ticino river is a symbol of Pavia Pavìa (the ancient Ticinum) (population 71,000) is a town and comune of south-western Lombardy, northern Italy, 35 km south of Milan on the lower Ticino river near its... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stata Sakska) is at a land area of 18,413 km² and a population of 4. ... Cologne (German: ; Kölsch: Kölle) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the largest European metropolitan areas with over 12 million... Aachen (French Aix-la-Chapelle, Dutch Aken, Latin Aquisgranum, Ripuarian Oche) is a spa city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany. ... Location within France Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... Mainz (French: Mayence) is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ...


After his return to Rome he held (April 29, 1050) another Easter synod, which was occupied largely with the controversy about the teachings of Berengar of Tours; in the same year he presided over provincial synods at Salerno, Siponto, and Vercelli, and in September revisited Germany, returning to Rome in time for a third Easter synod, at which the question of the reordination of those who had been ordained by simonists was considered. April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... Events Leofric becomes Bishop of Exeter Births Margrave Leopold II of Austria (d. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Berengar of Tours (c. ... Map of Italy showing Salerrno southeast of Naples Salerno is a town and a province capital in Campania, south-western Italy, located on the gulf of the same name on the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Vercelli, founded in 49 CE, is a city of about 46,000 inhabitants, in the Province of Vercelli, Italy. ...


In 1052 he joined the Emperor at Bratislava (Pressburg), and vainly sought to secure the submission of the Hungarians; and at Regensburg, Bamberg, and Worms the papal presence was marked by various ecclesiastical solemnities. Events Births Milarepa Deaths Heads of state Holy See - Leo IX pope (1049-1054) Categories: 1052 ... Logo Bratislava (until 1919: Prešporok in Slovak, Pressburg in German and English, Pozsony in Hungarian, Požun in Croatian) is the capital of Slovakia and the countrys largest city, with a population of some 450,000. ... Regensburg (English formerly Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 150,212 in 2004) in Bavaria, south-east Germany, located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, at the northernmost bend in the Danube. ... Bamberg is a town in Bavaria, Germany. ... // Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ...


Unthinkably for Popes of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, Leo IX went to war with other countries. After a fourth Easter synod in 1053 Leo IX set out against the Normans in the south with an army of Italians and German volunteers, but his forces sustained a total defeat at the Battle of Civitate on June 15, 1053; on going out, however, from the city to meet the enemy he was received with every token of submission, relief from the pressure of his ban was implored and fidelity and homage were sworn. From June 1053 to March 1054 the Pope was nevertheless detained at Benevento in honourable captivity; he did not long survive his return to Rome, where he died on April 19, 1054. Events June 18 - Battle of Civitate - 3000 horsemen of Norman Count Humphrey rout the troops of Pope Leo IX Good harvests in Europe Malcolm Canmore invades Scotland. ... The Normans (adapted from the name Northmen or Norsemen) were a mixture of the indigenous people of France and the Viking invaders under the leadership of Hrolf Ganger, who adopted the French name Rollo and swore allegiance to the king of France (Charles the Simple). ... At the Battle of Civitate on June 18, 1053 a Norman army defeated the army of Pope Leo IX. Background The Norman advances in southern Italy, following the gift of Aversa in 1030, had alarmed the Pope. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... Benevento is a town and archiepiscopal see of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 32 miles northeast of Naples. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ...


Leo IX is most remembered for being the Pope who sent the legatine mission, under Humbert of Mourmoutiers, cardinal-bishop of Silva Candida, which authored of the bull excommunicating the Patriarch of Constantinople, Michael I Cerularius (1043–59) in response to his actions concerning the church in Southern Italy. This act, combined with the Patriarch's own bull of excommunication against the West, marks the official split between the Eastern and Western Churches in what is now called the Schism of 1054, the Great Schism, or the East-West Schism. Humbert of Mourmoutiers (c. ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, ranking as the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... Michael I Caerularius, mosaic Michael I Caerularius, anglicized - Cerularius, (b. ... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... In Christianity, the East-West Schism, usually called the Great Schism (though this latter term sometimes refers to the Western Schism of 1378), was the event that separated Eastern Orthodoxy and Western Catholicism in 1054. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
Preceded by:
Damasus II
Pope of the
Roman Catholic Church

1049–54
Succeeded by:
Victor II

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope St. Leo IX (2409 words)
Before Leo could do anything in the matter of the reform of the Church on which his heart was set, he had first to put down another attempt on the part of the ex-Pope Benedict IX to seize the papal throne.
At the usual paschal synod which Leo was in the habit of holding at Rome, the heresy of Berengarius of Tours was condemned-a condemnation repeated by the pope a few months later at Vercelli.
Again Leo crossed the Alps, but, thinking he was sure of success, Henry would not accept the terms proposed by the pope, with the result that his expedition against the Hungarians proved a failure.
Pope Leo XIII - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (757 words)
Pope Leo XIII, born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci (March 2, 1810 – July 20, 1903), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, having succeeded Pope Pius IX (1846–78) on February 20, 1878 and reigning until his death in 1903.
Leo XIII was also the first Pope to come out strongly in favour of the French Republic, upsetting many French monarchists, but his support for democracy did not necessarily imply his acceptance of egalitarianism: "People differ in capacity, skill, health, strength; and unequal fortune is a necessary result of unequal condition.
Leo XIII's regnal length was subsequently exceeded by that of Pope John Paul II on March 14, 2004.
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