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Encyclopedia > Pope John XXII
John XXII
Birth name Jacques Duèze or d'Euse
Papacy began 1316
Papacy ended December 4, 1334
Predecessor Clement V
Successor Benedict XII
Born 1249
Cahors, France
Died December 4, 1334
Avignon, France
{{{footnotes}}}

Pope John XXII, born Jacques Duèze or d'Euse (1249December 4, 1334), was the son of a shoemaker in Cahors. He studied medicine in Montpellier and law in Paris. Image File history File links B_Johannes_XXII.jpg Summary H.H. Pope John XXII Licensing This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Births January 4 - Amadeus VI of Savoy, Count of Savoy (died 1383) January 13 - King Henry II of Castile (died 1379) May 25 - Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders (died 1398) August 30 - King Peter I of Castile (died 1369) James I of Cyprus (died... Clement V, born Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was Pope from 1305 to his death. ... Benedict XII, né Jacques Fournier ( 1280s – April 25, 1342), was Pope from 1334 to 1342. ... Events University, the first College at Oxford founded Births Emperor Kameyama of Japan Pope John XXII Frederick I, Margrave of Baden Deaths July 6 - Alexander II of Scotland (b. ... Cahors is a town in Western France in the Lot département. ... December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Births January 4 - Amadeus VI of Savoy, Count of Savoy (died 1383) January 13 - King Henry II of Castile (died 1379) May 25 - Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders (died 1398) August 30 - King Peter I of Castile (died 1369) James I of Cyprus (died... View over the Rhône River to North-East with Mt Ventoux at the rear Palais des papes Square below the Palace of the Popes Paul Vs coat-of-arms on the Palais des papes The Notre Dame des Doms cathedral is located in the heart of Avignon, near... Events University, the first College at Oxford founded Births Emperor Kameyama of Japan Pope John XXII Frederick I, Margrave of Baden Deaths July 6 - Alexander II of Scotland (b. ... December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Births January 4 - Amadeus VI of Savoy, Count of Savoy (died 1383) January 13 - King Henry II of Castile (died 1379) May 25 - Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders (died 1398) August 30 - King Peter I of Castile (died 1369) James I of Cyprus (died... Cahors is a town in Western France in the Lot département. ... Location within France Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


The two-year gap (sede vacante) between the death of Pope Clement V in 1314 and the election of John XXII in 1316 was due to extreme disagreement between the cardinals who were split into two factions. After two years, Philip V of France (1316–22) finally managed to arrange a conclave of twenty-three cardinals in Lyons. They duly elected Jacques d'Euse Pope John XXII and he was crowned in Lyon. He set up his residence in Avignon rather than Rome, the beginning of the Avignon Papacy (1309–77). Sede vacante in the canon law of the Roman Catholic Church is the vacancy of the episcopal see of a particular church. ... Clement V, born Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was Pope from 1305 to his death. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals during a consistory. ... Philip V the Tall (French: Philippe V le Long) (1293 - January 3, 1322) was King of France from 1316 to 1322, a member of the Capetian dynasty. ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... Lyons), see Lyons (disambiguation). ... City motto: Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. ... View over the Rhône River to North-East with Mt Ventoux at the rear Palais des papes Square below the Palace of the Popes Paul Vs coat-of-arms on the Palais des papes The Notre Dame des Doms cathedral is located in the heart of Avignon, near... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2. ... The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1305 to 1378 during which the Bishop of Rome, the Pope, lived in Avignon (now a part of France) rather than in Rome. ...


John XXII involved himself in the politics and religious movements of many European countries in order to advance the interests of the Church. This made him a very controversial Pope at the time. The aim of this page is to act as a comparison between European countries in many different aspects, such as population, GDP, life expectancy, etc. ... A controversy is a contentious dispute, a disagreement over which parties are actively arguing. ...


Before John XXII's election a contest had begun for the imperial crown between Louis IV of Bavaria (1314–47) and his opponent, Frederick I of Austria (1308–30). John XXII was neutral at first; but in 1323, when Louis IV had won and became Holy Roman Emperor, the Guelph (papal) party and the Ghibelline (imperial) party began a serious quarrel. This was partly provoked by John XXII's extreme claims of authority over the empire and also partly by Louis IV's support of the spiritual Franciscans, whom John XXII condemned for their insistence on evangelical poverty. Louis IV was assisted by Marsilius of Padua, and later by the British monk William of Ockham. Louis IV invaded Italy, entered Rome and set up Pietro Rainalducci as antipope Nicholas V (1328–30). The project was a fiasco, and Guelphic predominance at Rome was later restored. However, Louis IV had silenced the papal claims, and John XXII stayed the rest of his life in Avignon. Louis IV of Bavaria of the House of Wittelsbach (born 1282) was duke of Bavaria from 1294, duke of the Palatinate from 1329 and, after 1314, Holy Roman Emperor. ... There were two Dukes known as Frederick I of Austria. ... Events Canonization of Saint Thomas Aquinas Lithuania: Vilnius becomes capital August 12 - The Treaty of Nöteborg between Sweden and Novgorod (Russia) is signed, regulating the border for the first time Pharos of Alexandira Lighthouse (one of the Seven Wonders of the world) is destroyed by a series of earthquakes... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Guelph has several meanings: Guelph is a city in Ontario, Canada. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... Marsilius of Padua (1270 – 1342) was an Italian medieval scholar, born at Padua, and at first studied medicine in his own country. ... Hello, I am Sam, Sam I am. ... Nicholas V, Pietro Rainalducci († October 16, 1333) was an antipope in Italy from May 12, 1328 to July 25, 1330 during the pontificate of Pope John XXII at Avignon. ...


Pope John XXII was involved in a theological controversy involving the Beatific Vision. Beginning before he was Pope, he argued that those who died in the faith did not see the presence of God until the Last Judgment. The point is important to Catholics, since if the dead are not in the presence of God, then the whole idea of prayers to the saints would seem to be undermined. John XXII continued this argument for a time in sermons while he was Pope, although he never expressed his argument as an ex cathedra teaching. He eventually backed down from his position, and agreed that those who died while in the faith do indeed enjoy the Beatific Vision. In Roman Catholic theology, the beatific vision is the direct perception of God enjoyed by those who are in Heaven, imparting supreme happiness or blessedness. ... In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgment or Judgement Day is the ethical-judicial trial, judgment, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven or to hell) by a divine tribunal at the end of time, following the destruction of humans present earthly existence. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... In Roman Catholic dogma, the Latin phrase ex cathedra, literally meaning from the throne is applied in Catholic theology to statements made by the pope in his capacity as infallible guide and teacher of the faithful. ...


John XXII was not considered to have become a heretic despite his denial for many years of the Catholic doctrine that souls of persons who die in grace are immediately admitted to the Beatific Vision since this doctrine was not formally established by the Church, a lacuna that his successor, Pope Benedict XII (1334–42), immediately filled by his legislation in the encyclcal Benedictus Deus which formally made this doctrine a part of Church teaching. Benedict XII, né Jacques Fournier ( 1280s – April 25, 1342), was Pope from 1334 to 1342. ...


Pope John XXII was also an excellent administrator and did much efficient reorganizing.


See also

The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1305 to 1378 during which the Bishop of Rome, the Pope, lived in Avignon (now a part of France) rather than in Rome. ...

External links

Catholic encyclopedia entry

Preceded by:
Clement V
Pope
1316–34
Succeeded by:
Benedict XII

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope John XXII - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (481 words)
Pope John XXII, born Jacques Duèze or d'Euse (1249 – December 4, 1334), was the son of a shoemaker in Cahors.
John XXII was neutral at first; but in 1323, when Louis IV had won and became Holy Roman Emperor, the Guelph (papal) party and the Ghibelline (imperial) party began a serious quarrel.
Pope John XXII was involved in a theological controversy involving the Beatific Vision.
Pope John XXII - definition of Pope John XXII in Encyclopedia (165 words)
Pope John XXII, né Jacques d'Euse (1249 - December 4, 1334), was elected to the papacy in 1316 and reigned until his death in 1334.
The two-year gap between the death of Clement V and the election of John XXII was due to extreme disagreement between the cardinals who were split into two factions.
John involved himself in the politics and religious movements of many European countries in order to advance the interests of the Church.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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