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Encyclopedia > Pope John II
John II
Birth name Mercurius
Papacy began January 2, 533
Papacy ended May 8, 535
Predecessor Boniface II
Successor Agapetus I
Born  ???
Rome
Died May 8, 535
Rome
Other Popes named John

John II (born Mercurius) was Pope from 533 to 535. He was the son of a certain Projectus, born in Rome and a priest of the Basilica di San Clemente on the Caelian Hill. He was made pope January 2, 533. The basilica of St. Clement still retains several memorials of "Johannes surnamed Mercurius". Presbyter Mercurius is found on a fragment of an ancient ciborium, and several of the marble slabs which enclose the schola cantorum bear upon them, in the style of the sixth century, the monogram of Johannes.[1] Image File history File links Emblem_of_the_Papacy. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 1 - John becomes Pope, succeeding Pope Boniface II, who had died in 532. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Boniface II was Pope from 530 to 532. ... Agapetus I, or Agapitus I, pope (535 - 536), was the son of Gordian, a priest who had been slain during the riots in the days of Pope Symmachus. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,500 km²  (580 sq mi... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Pope John has been the name of twenty one Roman Catholic Popes: Pope John I Pope John II Pope John III Pope John IV Pope John V Pope John VI Pope John VII Pope John VIII Pope John IX Pope John X Pope John XI Pope John XII Pope John... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... Events February 1 - John becomes Pope, succeeding Pope Boniface II, who had died in 532. ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,500 km²  (580 sq mi... The Basilica of San Clemente is a complex of buildings in Rome centered around a 12th century Roman Catholic church dedicated to Pope Clement I. The site is notable as being an archeological record of Roman architectural, political and religious history from the early Christian era to the Middle Ages. ... The Caelian Hill (Latin Collis Caelius, Italian Celio) is one of the famous Seven Hills of Rome. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 1 - John becomes Pope, succeeding Pope Boniface II, who had died in 532. ... A Ciborium is a container, used in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and related Churches rituals to store Holy Communion. ...


He was the first pope to adopt a new name (regnal name) upon elevation to the papacy, as his theophoric birth name honoured the Roman god Mercury. A regnal name, or reign name, is a formal name used by some popes and monarchs during their reigns. ... Theophoric names are exceedingly common in the Ancient Near East and Mesopotamia, where the personal name of an individual included the name of a god in whose care the individual is entrusted. ... This article treats Mercury in cult practice and in archaic Rome. ...


At this period simony (the purchase or sale of church offices or preferment) in the election of popes and bishops was rife among clergy and laity. During the sede vacante before the election of John II there was a vacancy of over two months, during which "shameless trafficking in sacred things was indulged in. Even sacred vessels were exposed for sale"[1]. The matter had been brought before the Senate, and laid before the Arian Ostrogothic Court at Ravenna. As a result the last decree (Senatus Consultum) which the Roman Senate is known to have issued, passed under Boniface II, was directed against simony in papal elections. The decree was confirmed by Athalaric, king of the Ostrogoths. He ordered it to be engraved on marble, and to be placed in the atrium of St. Peter's (533). By one of Athalaric's own additions to the decree, it was decided, that if a disputed election was carried before the Gothic officials of Ravenna by the Roman clergy and people, three thousand solidi would have to be paid into court. This sum was to be given to the poor. John remained on good terms with Athalaric, who, being of the Arian Christianity, was content to refer to John's tribunal all actions brought against the Roman clergy. Simony is the ecclesiastical crime and personal sin of paying for offices or positions in the hierarchy of a church, named after Simon Magus, who appears in the Acts of the Apostles 8:18-24. ... Sede vacante is the vacancy of the episcopal see of a particular church in the Canon law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire, which ended in the 6th century AD. The word Senatus is derived from the Latin word senex, meaning old man or elder. ... Boniface II was Pope from 530 to 532. ... Athalaric (516 - 2 October 534), king of the Ostrogoths in Italy, grandson of Theodoric the Great, became king on his grand-fathers death (526). ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... Julian solidus, ca. ... Arian may refer to one of the following. ...


The Liber Pontificalis records that the following year John obtained valuable gifts as well as a profession of orthodox faith from the Byzantine emperor Justinian I the Great, a significant accomplishment in light of the strength of Monophysitism in the Byzantine Empire at that time. The Book of the Popes or the Liber Pontificalis is a major source for early medieval history but was also met with intense critical scrutiny. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning one, alone and physis meaning nature) is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ...


The notorious adulterous behavior of Contumeliosus, Bishop of Riez in Provence[2], caused John to order the bishops of Gaul to confine him in a monastery; until a new bishop should be appointed, he bade the clergy of Riez obey the Bishop of Arles. Pope John II deposed the adulterous Bishop Contumeliosus of Riez (in Gaul), and named Caesarius of Arles administrator of the diocese-the first act of jurisdiction of this kind recorded of a pope. ... Coordinates Administration Country France Région Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Département Bouches-du-Rhône (sous-préfecture) Arrondissement Arles Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest Intercommunality Communauté dagglomération Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette Mayor Hervé Schiavetti  (PS) (2001-2008) Statistics...


Two hundred and seventeen bishops assembled in a council at Carthage (535) submitted to John II whether bishops who had lapsed into Arianism should, on repentance keep their rank or be admitted only to lay communion. The question of readmittance to the lapsed troubled north Africa for centuries: see Novatianism and Donatism. The answer to their question was given by Agapetus, as John II died May 8, 535. He was buried in St Peter's Basilica. This article is about theological views like those of Arius. ... The Novatianists following Novatius, or Novatian, held a strict view that refused readmission to communion of those baptized Christians who had denied their faith or performed the formalities of a ritual sacrifice to the pagan gods, under the pressures of the persecution sanctioned by Emperor Decius, in 250 A.D... The Donatists (founded by the Berber christian Donatus) were followers of a belief considered a heresy by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Agapetus I, or Agapitus I, pope (535 - 536), was the son of Gordian, a priest who had been slain during the riots in the days of Pope Symmachus. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Pope John II, Catholic Encyclopædia.
  2. ^ Agapetus, in Henry Wace, A Dictionary of Christian Biography.
Preceded by
Boniface II
Pope
533–535
Succeeded by
Agapetus I

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