FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pope Honorius IV
Honorius IV
Birth name Giacomo Savelli
Papacy began May 20, 1285
Papacy ended April 3, 1287
Predecessor Martin IV
Successor Nicholas IV
Born ca. 1210
Rome, Italy
Died April 3, 1287
Rome, Italy
Other popes named Honorius

Pope Honorius IV (ca. 1210 – April 3, 1287), born Giacomo Savelli, was Pope for two years from 1285 to 1287. During his unremarkable pontificate he largely continued to pursue the pro-French policy of his predecessor, Pope Martin IV (1281–85). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Construction of the Uppsala Cathedral began in 1287. ... Martin IV, né Simon de Brion (ca. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was Pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Tsuchimikado, emperor of Japan Emperor Juntoku ascends to the throne of Japan Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor excommunicated by Pope Innocent III for invading southern Italy in 1210 Gottfried von Strassburg writes his epic poem Tristan about 1210 Beginning of Delhi Sultanate Births... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Construction of the Uppsala Cathedral began in 1287. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Pope Honorius could refer to: Pope Honorius I Pope Honorius II Pope Honorius III Pope Honorius IV This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Construction of the Uppsala Cathedral began in 1287. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Construction of the Uppsala Cathedral began in 1287. ... Martin IV, né Simon de Brion (ca. ...

Contents

Early career

Savelli was born in Rome, into the rich and influential Roman family of the Savelli that had already provided a pope, his great-uncle, Honorius III (1216–1227). The rich and influential Roman family of the Savelli provided four popes, Benedict II (684–685), Gregory II (715–731), Honorius III (1216–27), the senator Luca Savelli, who sacked the Lateran in 1234, and the senators son, Honorius IV (1285-87). ... Honorius III, né Cencio Savelli (b. ...


He studied at the University of Paris, during which time he held a prebend and a canonry at the cathedral of Châlons-sur-Marne. Later he obtained the benefice of rector at the church of Berton, in the diocese of Norwich, in England, a nation he never visited. The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... A prebendary is a post connected to a cathedral or collegiate church and is a type of canon. ... A canon (from the Latin canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανωνικος relating to a rule) is a priest who is a member of certain bodies of the Christian clergy subject to an ecclesiastical rule (canon). ... Châlons-en-Champagne is a city and commune in France. ... Originally a benefice was a gift of land for life as a reward (Latin beneficium, means to do well) for services rendered. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... The Diocese of Norwich forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total...


In 1261 he was created Cardinal Deacon of Santa Maria in Cosmedin by Pope Urban IV (1261–64), who also appointed him papal prefect in Tuscany and captain of the papal army. Cardinal Savelli pursued a diplomatic career. Pope Clement IV (1265–68) sent him and three other cardinals to invest Charles of Anjou as King of Sicily at Rome on 28 July 1265. After the long deadlocked vacancy in the papal see after Clement IV's death, a vacant seat of three years, he was one of the six cardinals who finally elected Pope Gregory X (1271–1276) by compromise on 1 September 1271, in a conclave held at Viterbo because conditions in Rome were too turbulent. Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... The Cardinal Deacons are the lowest-ranked of the three orders of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Santa Maria in Cosmedin is a church in Rome founded in the 6th century. ... Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. ... A prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere: make in front, i. ... Tuscany (Italian: ) is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected Pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Sede vacante is the vacancy of the episcopal see of a particular church in the Canon law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Gregory X, né Theobald Visconti (Piacenza, ca. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Country Italy Region Lazio Province Viterbo (VT) Mayor Giampiero Gabbianelli Elevation 326 m Area 406,28 km² Population  - Total 60,537  - Density 148. ...


In 1274 he accompanied Gregory X to the Council of Lyon where it was established that only four mendicant orders were to be tolerated: Dominicans, Franciscans, Augustinians and Carmelites. In July, 1276, he was one of the three cardinals whom Pope Adrian V (1276) sent to Viterbo with instructions to treat with the German King, Rudolf I of Habsburg (1273–1291), concerning his imperial coronation at Rome and his future relations towards Charles of Anjou, whom papal policy supported. The death of Adrian V in the following month rendered fruitless the negotiations with Rudolf I. Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... The Second Council of Lyon was a Roman Catholic council convened in Lyon in 1274. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... Detail of St. ... The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... January 21 - Pope Innocent V succeeds Pope Gregory X as the 185th pope. ... Adrian V (also known as Hadrian V), né Ottobuono de Fieschi (c. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ...


Elected Pope

When Martin IV (1281–85) died 28 March, 1285, at Perugia, Cardinal Savelli was unanimously elected Pope on May 20 and took the name of Honorius IV. His election was one of the speediest in the history of the papacy. On May 20, he was consecrated bishop and crowned Pope in the Basilica of St. Peter. Honorius IV was already advanced in age and so severely affected with the gout that he could neither stand nor walk. When saying Mass he was obliged to sit on a stool and at the elevation of the host his hands had to be raised by a mechanical contrivance. is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: Country Italy Region Umbria Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop. ...


Sicilian Conflict

Sicilian affairs required immediate attention. Previously, under Martin IV, the Sicilians had rejected the rule of Charles of Anjou, taking Pedro III of Aragon (1276–85) as their King without the consent and approval of the Pope. Peter III of Aragon (Catalan: Pere) (1239 – November 11, 1285, also Peter I of Valencia, Peter II of Barcelona), known as the Great, was the king of Aragon and Valencia and count of Barcelona from 1276 to 1285. ...


The massacre of 31 March 1282, known as the Sicilian Vespers, had precluded any reconciliation; Martin IV put Sicily and Pedro III under an interdict, deprived Pedro III of the Kingdom of Aragon, and gave it to Charles of Valois, the younger of the sons of King Philip III of France (1270–85) whom he assisted in his attempts to recover Sicily by force of arms. The Sicilians not only repulsed the attacks of the combined French and Papal forces but also captured the Angevin heir, Charles of Salerno. On 6 January, 1285, Charles of Anjou died, leaving his captive son Charles of Salerno as his natural successor. Honorius IV, more peaceably inclined than Martin IV, did not renounce the Church's support of the House of Anjou, nor did he set aside the severe ecclesiastical punishments imposed upon Sicily. March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Sicilian Vespers (1846), by Francesco Hayez The Sicilian Vespers is the name given to a rebellion in Sicily in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I, who had taken control of the island with Papal support in 1266. ... The word interdict usually refers to an ecclesiastical penalty in the Roman Catholic Church. ... Charles III of Valois (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella of Aragon. ... Philip III the Bold (French: Philippe III le Hardi) (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Charles II, known as the Lame (Fr. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the other hand, he did not approve of the tyrannical government to which the Sicilians had been subject under Charles of Anjou. This is evident from his wise legislation as embodied in his constitution of 17 September, 1285 (Constitutio super ordinatione regni Siciliae) in which he stated that no government can prosper which is not founded on justice and peace, and passed forty-five ordinances intended chiefly to protect the people of Sicily against their king and his officials. September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The death of Pedro III on November 11, 1285 changed the Sicilian situation in that his kingdoms were divided between his two sons Alfonso III of Aragon (1285–91) receiving the crown of Aragon and James II (1285–96) succeeding as King of Sicily. Honorius IV acknowledged neither the one nor the other: on 11 April 1286, he solemnly excommunicated King James II of Sicily and the bishops who had taken part in his coronation at Palermo on February 2. Neither the King nor the bishops concerned themselves about the excommunication. The King even sent a hostile fleet to the Roman coast and destroyed the city of Astura by fire. November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Alfons or Alfonso III of Aragon (1265 – June 18, 1291, also Alfons II of Barcelona), surnamed the Liberal, was the king of Aragon and count of Barcelona from 1285 to 1291. ... Here is a list of the rulers of Aragon, now a region of north-eastern Spain. ... James II of Aragon James II, King of Aragon (10 August 1267 – 2 November 1327), in Spanish Jaime II, in Aragonese Chaime II, in Catalan Jaume II, also James II of Barcelona, called The Just (Aragonese: Lo Chusto, Catalan: El Just) was the second son of Peter III of Aragon... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Margaret I of Scotland became queen of Scotland, end of Canmore dynasty. ... Excommunication is a religious censure used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... For other uses, see Palermo (disambiguation). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Torre Astura, formerly an island, is now a peninsula, on the coast of Latium, Italy, 7 M. S.E. of Antium, at the S.E. extremity of the Bay of Antium. ...


Charles of Salerno, the Angevin pretender, who was still held captive by the Sicilians, finally grew tired of his long captivity and signed a contract on February 27, 1287, in which he renounced his claims to the Kingdom of Sicily in favour of James II of Aragon and his heirs. Honorius IV, however, declared the contract invalid and forbade all similar agreements for the future. is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


While Honorius IV was inexorable in the stand he had taken towards Sicily, his relations towards Alfonso III of Aragon became less hostile. Through the efforts of King Edward I of England (1272–1307), negotiations for peace were begun by Honorius IV and King Alfonso III. The Pope, however, did not live long enough to complete these negotiations, which finally resulted in a peaceful settlement of the Aragonese as well as the Sicilian question in 1302 under Pope Boniface VIII (1294–1303). Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Events July 11 - Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch), major victory of Flanders over the French occupier. ... Pope Boniface VIII (c. ...


Rome

Rome and the States of the Church enjoyed a period of tranquillity during the pontificate of Honorius IV, the like of which they had not enjoyed for many years. He had the satisfaction of reducing the most powerful and obstinate enemy of papal authority, Count Guido of Montefeltro, who for many years had successfully resisted the papal troops. The authority of the Pope was now recognized throughout the papal territory, which then comprised the Exarchate of Ravenna, the March of Ancona, the Duchy of Spoleto, the County of Bertinoro, the Mathildian lands, and the Pentapolis, viz. the cities of Rimini, Pesaro, Fano, Senigallia, and Ancona. Honorius IV was the first Pope to employ the great family banking houses of central and northern Italy for the collection of papal dues. The Exarchate of Ravenna was a center of Byzantine power in Italy, from the end of the 6th century to 751 A.D., when the last Exarch was put to death by the Emperors enemies in Italy, the Lombards. ... Ancona is a city and a seaport in the Marche, a region of central Italy, population 101,909 (2005). ... Spoleto (Latin: Spoletium), 42°44′ N 12°44′ E, an ancient town in the Italian province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 385 meters (1391 ft) above sea-level on a foothill of the Apennines. ... Obadiah ben Abraham of Bertinoro was a Jewish rabbi and a commentator on the Mishnah, commonly known as The Bartenura by Orthodox Judaism Talmud scholars. ... A Pentapolis, from the Greek words penta five and polis city(-state) is geographic and/or institutional grouping of five cities. ... Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. ... Pesaro is a town and comune in the Italian region of the Marche, capital of the Pesaro e Urbino province, on the Adriatic. ... Country Italy Region Marche Province Pesaro e Urbino (PU) Mayor Stefano Aguzzi (since June 2004) Elevation 12 m Area 121 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 61,675  - Density 512/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Fanesi Dialing code 0721 Postal code 61032 Frazioni Bellocchi, Camminate... Misa River in Senigallia. ... Ancona is a city and a seaport in the Marche, a region of central Italy, population 101,909 (2005). ...


The Romans were greatly elated at the election of Honorius IV, for he was a citizen of Rome and a brother of Pandulf, a senator of Rome. The continuous disturbances in Rome during the pontificate of Martin IV had not allowed that pope to reside in Rome, but now the Romans cordially invited Honorius IV to make Rome his permanent residence. During the first few months of his pontificate he lived in the Vatican, but in the autumn of 1285 he removed to the magnificent palace which he had just erected on the Aventine. The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills that ancient Rome was built on. ...


Empire

In his relations with the empire, where no more danger was to be apprehended since the fall of the Hohenstaufen, he followed the via media taken by Gregory X. Rudolf I of Germany sent Bishop Henry of Basel to Rome to request coronation. Honorius IV appointed the envoy archbishop of Mainz, fixed a date for the coronation, and sent Cardinal John of Tusculum to Germany to assist Rudolf I's cause. But general opposition showed itself to the papal interference; a council at Würzburg (16–18 March, 1287) protested energetically, and Rudolf I had to protect the legate from personal violence, so that both his plans and the Pope's failed. Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Hapsburg) (May 1, 1218 - July 15, 1291) was a German king. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Giovanni Boccamazza[1] (died 1309) was an Italian Cardinal. ... Würzburg Residenz. ...


Other acts

Honorius IV inherited plans for another crusade, but confined himself to collecting the tithes imposed by the Council of Lyon, arranging with the great banking-houses of Florence, Siena, and Pistoia to act as his agents. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... A tithe is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a religious organization. ... The Council of Lyons refers to either the 13th or 14th ecumenical councils of the Roman Catholic Church, both held in Lyon, France during the 13th century: First Council of Lyons (1245; Pope Innocent IV; regarding the Crusades) Second Council of Lyons (1274; Pope Gregory X; regarding papal election procedures... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Piazza del Campo Siena is a city in Tuscany, Italy. ... Pistoia (ancient Pistoria) is a city in the Tuscany region of Italy, the capital of a province of the same name, located about 30 km (18 mi) west and north of Florence. ...


The two largest religious orders received many new privileges from Honorius IV, documented in his Regesta. He often appointed them to special missions and to bishoprics, and gave them exclusive charge of the Inquisition. Inquisition (capitalized I) is broadly used, to refer to things related to judgment of heresy by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


He also approved the privileges of the Carmelites and the Augustinian hermits and permitted the former to exchange their striped habit for a white one. He was especially devoted to the order founded by William X of Aquitaine (d. 1156), and added numerous privileges to those which they had already received from Alexander IV and Urban IV. Besides turning over to them some deserted Benedictine monasteries, he presented them with the monastery of St. Paul at Albano, which he himself had founded and richly endowed when he was still cardinal. The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. ... Events Prince Yuriy Dolgorukiy fortifies Moscow, regarded as the date of the founding of the city Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ...


Salimbene, the chronicler of Parma, asserted that Honorius IV was a foe to the religious orders. This may reflect the fact that he opposed the Apostolic Brethren, an order embracing evangelical poverty that had been started by Gerard Segarelli at Parma in 1260. On 11 March, 1286, he issued a bull condemning them as heretics. Salimbene di Adam or Salimbene of Parma (9 October 1221– 1290), was a Franciscan friar and chronicler who is an important source for Italian history of the 13th century. ... Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, famous for its architecture and the fine countryside around it. ... The Apostolic Brethren (sometimes referred to as Apostolici, Apostoli, Apostles) were a Christian sect founded in northern Italy in the latter half of the 13th century by Gerard Segarelli, a native of Alzano in the territory of Parma. ... Gerard or Gherardo or Gherardino Segarelli or Segalelli (around 1240 Parma – July 18, 1300 Parma) was the founder of Apostolic Brethren (in Latin Apostolici). ... The magnificent Cathedral of Chartres was dedicated in 1260. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ...


At the University of Paris he advocated the establishment of chairs for Eastern languages in order to give an opportunity of studying these languages to those who intended to labour for the conversion of the Muslims and the reunion of the schismatic churches in the East. The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... For the later Papal Schism in Avignon, see Western Schism. ...


He raised only one man to be cardinal, his cousin Giovanni Boccamazza, archbishop of Monreale, 22 December, 1285. Giovanni Boccamazza[1] (died 1309) was an Italian Cardinal. ... The apse of the cathedral of Monreale Monreale is a small city in the province of Palermo, in Sicily, Italy. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The tomb of Pope Honorius IV is in the church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli, Rome. Facade of Santa Maria in Aracoeli with the monumental ladder The basilica of Santa Maria in Aracoeli is on the Campidoglio, in Rome. ...


References

The Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge is a 1914 religious encyclopedia, published in thirteen volumes. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

External links

  • The cardinals of the Holy Roman Church
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Martin IV
Pope
1285–87
Succeeded by
Nicholas IV
Preceded by
Martin IV
Pontifex Maximus of Rome
1285–87
Succeeded by
Nicholas IV

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Honorius IV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1507 words)
Honorius IV appointed the envoy archbishop of Mainz, fixed a date for the coronation, and sent Cardinal John of Tusculum to Germany to assist Rudolf I's cause.
Honorius IV inherited plans for another crusade, but confined himself to collecting the tithes imposed by the Council of Lyons, arranging with the great banking-houses of Florence, Siena, and Pistoia to act as his agents.
The tomb of Honorius IV is in the church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli, Rome.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m