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Encyclopedia > Pope Clement VII
Clement VII
Birth name Giulio di Giuliano de' Medici
Papacy began November 19, 1523
Papacy ended September 25, 1534
Predecessor Adrian VI
Successor Paul III
Born May 26, 1478(1478-05-26)
Florence, Italy
Died September 25, 1534 (aged 56)
Rome, Italy
Other popes named Clement
For the antipope (1378–1394) see antipope Clement VII.

Pope Clement VII (May 26, 1478September 25, 1534), born Giulio di Giuliano de' Medici, was a cardinal from 1513 to 1523 and was Pope from 1523 to 1534. Image File history File links Pope_Clement_VII.JPG‎ Description: Pope Klemens VII: Source: originally uploaded to en by User:Isis File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Clement VII War of the League of Cognac ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... Pope Adrian VI (Utrecht, March 2, 1459 – September 14, 1523), born Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens, son of Floris Boeyens, served as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1522 until his death. ... Pope Paul III with his cardinal-nephew Alessandro Cardinal Farnese (left) and his other grandson (right), Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1534 to his death 1549. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 18 - George, Duke of Clarence, convicted of treason against his older brother Edward IV of England, is privately executed in the Tower of London. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... There have been fourteen popes named Clement. ... For the book by Robert Rankin, see The Antipope. ... For the other Clement VII who was Pope from 1523 to 1534, see Pope Clement VII. Robert of Geneva (1342-16 September 1394) was elected to the papacy by the French cardinals who opposed Urban VI, thereby becoming the first antipope of the Western Schism, as Pope Clement VII. He... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 18 - George, Duke of Clarence, convicted of treason against his older brother Edward IV of England, is privately executed in the Tower of London. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born in Florence one month after his father, Giuliano de' Medici, was assassinated in the Pazzi Conspiracy. Although his parents had not had a formal marriage, a canon law loophole allowing for the parents to have been betrothed per sponsalia de presenti meant that Giulio was considered legitimate. He was thus the nephew of Lorenzo the Magnificent, who educated him in his youth. This article is about the city in Italy. ... Portrait by Sandro Botticelli. ... The Pazzi family were Tuscan nobles who had become bankers in Florence in the 14th century. ... For other uses, see Lorenzo de Medici (disambiguation). ...

Pope Leo X with his cardinal-cousin Giulio de' Medici (left, future Pope Clement VII)

Giulio was made a Knight of Rhodes and Grand Prior of Capua, and, upon the election of his cousin Giovanni de' Medici to the pontificate as Pope Leo X (1513–21), he soon became a powerful figure in Rome. Upon his cousin's accession to the papacy, Giulio became his principal minister and confidant, especially in the maintenance of the Medici interest at Florence as archbishop of that city. On 23 September 1513, he was made cardinal and he was consecrated on 29 September. He had the credit of being the main director of papal policy during the whole of Leo X's pontificate. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 467 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2024 × 2595 pixel, file size: 516 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 467 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2024 × 2595 pixel, file size: 516 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Pope Leo X, born Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (11 December 1475 – 1 December 1521) was Pope from 1513 to his death. ... Pietro Ottoboni, the last Cardinal Nephew, painted by Francesco Trevisani A cardinal-nephew (Latin: ;[1] Italian: ;[2] Spanish: ; French: )[3] is a cardinal elevated by a pope who is his uncle, or more generally, his relative. ... Pope Leo X, born Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (11 December 1475 – 1 December 1521) was Pope from 1513 to his death. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Election

At Leo X's death in 1521, Cardinal Medici was considered especially papabile in the protracted conclave. Although unable to gain the Papacy for himself or his ally Alessandro Farnese (both preferred candidates of Emperor Charles V (1519–58)), he took a leading part in determining the unexpected election of the short-lived Pope Adrian VI (1522–23), with whom he also wielded formidable influence. Following Adrian VI's death on 14 September 1523, Medici finally succeeded in being elected Pope Clement VII in the next conclave (November 19, 1523). Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Papabile ( Papabili) is an unofficial Italian term first coined by Vaticanologists and now used internationally in many languages to describe a cardinal of whom it is thought likely or possible that he will be elected pope. ... Pope Paul III with his cardinal-nephew Alessandro Cardinal Farnese (left) and his other grandson (right), Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1534 to his death 1549. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Pope Adrian VI (Utrecht, March 2, 1459 – September 14, 1523), born Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens, son of Floris Boeyens, served as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1522 until his death. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ...


He brought to the Papal throne a high reputation for political ability, and possessed in fact all the accomplishments of a wily diplomat. However, he was considered worldly and indifferent to what went on around him, including the ongoing Protestant reformation. “Reformation” redirects here. ...


Papacy

At his accession, Clement VII sent the Archbishop of Capua, Nikolaus Cardinal von Schönberg, to the Kings of France, Spain and England, in order to bring the war then raging in Europe to a peace. But his attempt failed. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Capua, also called the Archdiocese of Capua, is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Italy. ... Nikolaus Cardinal von Schönberg (born 11 August 1472 in Roth-Schönberg near Meissen, Saxony/Germany, died 7 September 1537 in Capua, Italy) was an Archbishop of Capua. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Continental and Medici politics

Ippolito de' Medici, cardinal-nephew of Clement VII and illegitimate son of Giuliano di Lorenzo de' Medici

Francis I of France's conquest of Milan in 1524 prompted the Pope to quit the Imperial-Spanish side and to ally himself with other Italian princes, including the Republic of Venice, and France in the January of 1525. This treaty granted the definitive acquisition of Parma and Piacenza for the Papal States, the rule of Medici over Florence and the free passage of the French troops to Naples. This policy in itself was sound and patriotic, but Clement VII's zeal soon cooled; by his want of foresight and unseasonable economy he laid himself open to an attack from the turbulent Roman barons, which obliged him to invoke the mediation of the Emperor. One month later, however, Francis I was crushed and imprisoned in the Battle of Pavia, and Clement VII veered back to his former engagements with Charles V, signing an alliance with the viceroy of Naples. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 642 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 1173 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 642 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 1173 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ippolito de Medici (1511-1535) was the illegitimate only son of Cardinal Giuliano de Medici. ... Pietro Ottoboni, the last Cardinal Nephew, painted by Francesco Trevisani A cardinal-nephew (Latin: cardinalis nepos;[1] Italian: cardinale nipote;[2] Spanish: valido de su tío; French: le prince de la fortune)[3] is a cardinal elevated by a pope who is his uncle, or more generally, his relative. ... Portrait of Giuliano de Medici by Raphael. ... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, famous for its architecture and the fine countryside around it. ... Piacenza (Placentia in Latin and old-fashioned English, Piasëinsa in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... “Battle of Pavia” redirects here. ...


But he was to change sides again when Francis I was freed after the Peace of Madrid (January 1526): the Pope entered in the League of Cognac together with France, Venice and Francesco Sforza of Milan. Clement VII issued an invective against Charles V, who in reply defined him a "wolf" instead of a "shepherd", menacing the summoning of a council about the Lutheran question. The League of Cognac of 1526 pitted France, England, Pope Clement VII, Venice, Florence, and elements of Milan against the Emperor Charles V. Categories: Stub ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Portrait of Francesco Sforza, ca 1460, by Bonifazio Bembo: Sforza insisted on being shown in his worn dirty old campaigning hat. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ...


Sack of Rome

The Pope's wavering politics also caused the rise of the Imperial party inside the Curia: Pompeo Cardinal Colonna's soldiers pillaged the Vatican City and gained control of the whole of Rome in his name. The humiliated Pope promised therefore to bring the Papal States to the Imperial side again. But soon after, Colonna left the siege and went to Naples, not keeping his promises and dismissing the Cardinal from his charge. From this point on, Clement VII could do nothing but follow the fate of the French party to end. Pompeo Colonna (May 12, 1479 - June 28, 1532) was an Italian Cardinal, politician and condottiero. ...


Soon he found himself alone in Italy too, as the duke of Ferrara had sided with the Imperial army, permitting to the horde of Landsknechts led by Charles III, Duke of Bourbon, and Georg von Frundsberg, to reach Rome without harm. Ferrara is a city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, capital city of the province of Ferrara. ... Landsknecht. ... Charles III de Bourbon, engraved portrait by Thomas de Leu Charles III of Bourbon-Montpensier, Eighth Duke of Bourbon (February 17, 1490 – May 6, 1527 in Rome) was Count of Montpensier and Dauphin of Auvergne. ... Georg von Frundsberg (1473-1528) was a German Knight and landowner. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...

Castel Sant'Angelo.

Charles of Bourbon died during the long siege, and his troops, unpaid and left without a guide, felt free to ravage Rome from May 6, 1527. The innumerable series of murders, rapes and vandalism that followed ended forever the splendours of the Renaissance Rome. Clement VII, who had displayed no more resolution in his military than in his political conduct, was shortly afterwards (June 6) obliged to surrender himself together with the castle of Sant'Angelo, where he had taken refuge. He agreed to pay a ransom of 400,000 ducati in exchange for his life; conditions included the cession of Parma, Piacenza, Civitavecchia and Modena to the Holy Roman Empire. (Only the last could be occupied in fact.) At the same time, Venice took advantage of his situation to capture Cervia and Ravenna while Sigismondo Malatesta returned in Rimini. Castel SantAngelo in Rome, Italy. ... Castel SantAngelo in Rome, Italy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the town with the same name, see Castel SantAngelo (RI) Castel SantAngelo from the bridge. ... The ducat (IPA: ) is a gold coin that was used as a trade currency throughout Europe before World War I. Its weight is 3. ... Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, famous for its architecture and the fine countryside around it. ... Piacenza (Placentia in Latin and old-fashioned English, Piasëinsa in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. ... Civitavecchia is a town and comune of the province of Rome in the central Italian region of Lazio, a sea port on the Tyrrhenian sea, 50 miles WNW of Rome, 42°06N 11°47E. According to the 2003 census, its population was 50,100. ... Modena (Mòdna in Modenese dialect) is a city and a province on the south side of the Po valley, in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. ... Cervia is a town in Italy. ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... Sigismondo Malatesta (November 1498 - December 1553) was an Italian condottiero. ... Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. ...


Clement was kept as a prisoner in Castel Sant'Angelo for six months. After having bought some Imperial officers, he escaped disguised as a peddler, and took shelter in Orvieto, and then in Viterbo. He came back to a depopulated and devastated Rome only in October 1528. Orvieto is a city in southwestern Umbria, Italy situated on the flat summit of a large butte of volcanic tuff. ... Country Italy Region Lazio Province Viterbo (VT) Mayor Giampiero Gabbianelli Elevation 326 m Area 406,28 km² Population  - Total 60,537  - Density 148. ...


Meanwhile, in Florence, Republican enemies of the Medici took advantage of the chaos to again expel the Pope's family from the city. This article is about the city in Italy. ...


In June of the following year the warring parts signed the Peace of Barcelona. The Papal States regained some cities and Charles V agreed to restore the Medici to power in Florence. In 1530, after an eleven-month siege, the Tuscan city capitulated, and Clement VII installed his illegitimate son Alessandro as Duke. Subsequently the Pope followed a policy of subservience to the Emperor, endeavouring on the one hand to induce him to act with severity against the Lutherans in Germany, and on the other to elude his demands for a general council. Combatants Holy Roman Empire, Spain Florence, France, Papal States, Republic of Venice Commanders Charles de Bourbon Francesco Guicciardini The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30 was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily Spain and the Holy Roman Empire—and the League of Cambrai, an alliance... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... This article is on the first Duke of Florence. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...


English Reformation

One momentous consequence of this dependence on Charles V was the breach with the Kingdom of England occasioned by Clement VII's refusal in 1533, justifiable in point of principle, to sanction the annulment of Henry VIII of England's (1509–47) marriage to Catherine of Aragon. Clement VII used various stalling tactics and delays. He paid spies to steal Henry VIII's love letters to his fiancée, Anne Boleyn, to prove that they were lovers. However, no evidence could be uncovered and even Clement VII had to grudgingly admit that all impartial evidence from England suggested that Anne Boleyn was strong-willed but morally upright. Clement VII's procrastination on the issue ultimately resulted in the English Parliament passing the Act of Supremacy (1534) that established the independent Church of England. Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Katherine of Aragon (Alcalá de Henares, 16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536), Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla, also known popularly after her time as Catherine of Aragon, was the first wife and Queen Consort of Henry VIII of England. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ... First Act of Supremacy 1534 The Act of Supremacy 1534 (26 Hen. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


Appearance

Clement VII painted by Sebastiano del Piombo, c.1531.

During his half-year imprisonment in 1527, Clement VII grew a full beard as a sign of mourning for the sack of Rome. This was a violation of Catholic canon law, which required priests to be clean-shaven; however, it had the precedent of the beard which Pope Julius II had worn for nine months in 1511-1512 as a similar sign of mourning for the loss of the Papal city of Bologna. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sebastiano del Piombo (1485 – June 21, 1547), Italian painter, was born at Venice. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Canon law is the term used for... Pope Julius II (December 5, 1443 – February 21, 1513), born Giuliano della Rovere, was Pope from 1503 to 1513. ...


Unlike Julius II, however, Clement VII kept his beard until his death in 1534. His example in wearing a beard was followed by his successor, Pope Paul III, and indeed by twenty-four popes who followed him, down to Pope Innocent XII, who died in 1700. Clement VII was thus the unintentional originator of a fashion that lasted well over a century. Pope Paul III with his cardinal-nephew Alessandro Cardinal Farnese (left) and his other grandson (right), Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1534 to his death 1549. ... Innocent XII, né Antonio Pignatelli (March 13, 1615 - September 27, 1700) pope from 1691 to 1700, was the successor of Alexander VIII. He came of a distinguished Naples family and was educated at the Jesuit college in Rome. ...


Death and character

Towards the end of his life Clement VII once more gave indications of a leaning towards a French alliance, which was prevented by his death in September 1534. He was buried in Santa Maria sopra Minerva. Facade of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. ...


As for the arts, Pope Clement VII is remembered for having ordered, just a few days before his death, Michelangelo's painting of The Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel. For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... St Bartholomew displaying his flayed skin (a self-portrait by Michelangelo) in The Last Judgement. ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ...


References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  • "Pope Clement VII" in the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ...

See also

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants France, the Holy Roman Empire, the states of Italy (notably the Republic of Venice, the Duchy of Milan, the Kingdom of Naples, the Papal States, Florence, and the Duchy of Ferrara), England, Scotland, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, the Swiss, Saxony, and others The Italian Wars, often referred to as... The Medici family was a powerful and influential Florentine family during the Renaissance, whose wealth and influence initially derived from the textile trade guided by the guild of the Becoming first bankers, and later politicians, clergy and nobles, the Medici attained their greatest prominence during the 15th through 17th centuries...

External links

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Adrian VI
Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Peter (deprecated A.D. 495), Vicar of Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles
Supreme Pontiff (Pontifex Maximus)
Patriarch of the West (deprecated 2006), Primate of Italy,
Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province
Servant of the Servants of God
Pope

1523–34
Succeeded by
Paul III



“Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Pope Adrian VI (Utrecht, March 2, 1459 – September 14, 1523), born Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens, son of Floris Boeyens, served as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1522 until his death. ... Popes buried in St. ... This article is about the office of the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Vicar of Christ (Latin Vicarius Christi) has been used since Pope Gelasius I, alongside a few rarer vicarial titles, as one of the titles of the Bishop of Rome —the Pope— as head of the universal apostolic Catholic Church. ... This article is about the office of the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... This article is about the office of the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Servus Servorum Dei is a Latin phrase meaning Servant of the Servants of God. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... Pope Paul III with his cardinal-nephew Alessandro Cardinal Farnese (left) and his other grandson (right), Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1534 to his death 1549. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Clement VII (2398 words)
Clement was anxious to gratify Henry, and he did not make much difficulty about the contingent dispensation from affinity, judging, no doubt, that, as it would only take effect when the marriage with Catherine was concelled, it was of no practical consequence.
Clement's commission empowered Wolsey and Campeggio to pronounce upon the sufficiency of the motives alleged in a certain specified document, viz., the Bull; but the Brief was not contemplated by, and lay outside, their commission.
Clement retaliated by pronouncing censure against those who threatened to have the king's divorce suit decided by an English tribunal, and forbade Henry to proceed to a new marriage before a decision was given in Rome.
pope clement ii - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com (214 words)
Pope Clement Ii His Holiness Pope Clement II, n Suidger of Morsleben (died October 9, 1047), pope (December 25, 1046 - October 1047), son of Count Konrad of Morsleben and Hornburg and his wife Amulrad.
All this was met with criticism from church reformers, although Clement's pontificate, starting with the Roman synod of 1047, initiated an improvement on the state of things in the Catholic church, particularly through enacting decrees against simony.
Clement's tomb in the western choir of the Bamberg Cathedral is the only tomb of a pope north of the Alps.
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