FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pope Clement I
Saint Clement I
Birth name Clemens
Papacy began circa 88
Papacy ended 99
Predecessor Anacletus
Successor Evaristus
Born Unknown
Rome, Italy
Died circa 99
Crimea
Other popes named Clement

Saint Clement I, also known as Pope Clement I, Saint Clement of Rome, or Clemens Romanus, was the fourth Pope and Bishop of Rome[1] and is considered the first Apostolic Father[1] of the early Christian church. Image File history File links StClement1. ... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 Events Pope Clement I succeeded Pope Anacletus I Han Hedi succeeded Han Zhangdi as emperor of... Anacletus, or Anencletus, was the third pope (after St Peter and St Linus). ... Pope Saint Evaristus was the fifth pope, holding office from about 98 to 105 (99 to 108 in the Vaticans Annuario Pontificio of 2003). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 99. ... Motto: ÐŸÑ€Ð¾Ñ†Ð²ÐµÑ‚ание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem: ÐÐ¸Ð²Ñ‹ и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... There have been fourteen popes named Clement. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... The Apostolic Fathers were a small collection of Christian authors who lived and wrote in the late 1st and early 2nd centuries who are acknowledged as leaders in the early church, but whose writings were not included in the collection of Chirstian scripture, the New Testament Biblical canon. ... The Early Christians is a term used to refer to the early followers of Jesus of Nazareth, before the emergence of established Christian orthodoxy. ...


Clement's letter to the Corinthian church (1 Clement) was widely read and is one of the oldest Christian documents still in existence outside the New Testament. This important work is the first to manifest Rome's primacy and the first to affirm the apostolic authority of the church fathers.[2] The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


Few details are known about Clement's life. While sources vary, it is likely Clement became Pope and Bishop of Rome in the year 88, although it may have been as late as 92. It is somewhat certain that he died in the year 99.[1] The Holy See's Annuario Pontificio (2003) cites a reign from 92 to 99. According to tradition, Clement was imprisoned under the Emperor Trajan and led a miraculous ministry among fellow prisoners. He was then executed by being tied to an anchor and thrown into the sea. The Annuario Pontificio or Pontifical Yearbook is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Emperor Trajan Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53-August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98-117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the so-called Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ...


St. Clement's name is in the Roman Canon of the Mass. He is commemorated on November 23 as pope and martyr in the Roman Catholic Church as well as in the Anglican Communion and the Lutheran church. The Syriac Orthodox Church, the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church and the Greek Orthodox Church, as well as the Syriac Catholic Church, the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church and Byzantine Rite Eastern Catholic Churches, commemorate St. Clement of Rome (called in Syriac Mor Clemis) on November 24; the Russian Orthodox Church on November 25; and the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria on December 8. Before the 1970 revision of the Roman Missal, the Mass had, in the Roman Rite, only one Anaphora or Eucharistic Prayer, which was referred to as the Canon of the Mass, and which, in the present text of the Roman Missal, is called Eucharistic Prayer I or the Roman Canon. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... The Indian Orthodox Church (also known as the Malankara Orthodox Church, Orthodox Church of the East, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, Orthodox Syrian Church of the East), is a prominent member of the Oriental Orthodox Church family. ... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: HellÄ“northódoxÄ“ EkklÄ“sía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... The Syriac Catholic Church or Syrian Catholic Church is a Christian church in the Levant having practices and rites in common with the Syriac Orthodox Church. ... The Syro-Malankara Catholic Church is a Major Archepiscopal sui iuris Eastern Rite Roman Catholic Church in communion with the Roman Catholic Church, with historical links to the Syrian Catholic Church. ... The Byzantine Rite, sometimes called Constantinopolitan, is the liturgical rite used (in various languages) by all the Eastern Orthodox Churches and by several Eastern Catholic Churches. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... Syriac ( Suryāyā) is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jesus Christ in a Coptic icon The Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria (Coptic: , literally: the Egyptian Orthodox Church of Alexandria) is the official name for the largest Christian church in Egypt. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Identity

Tradition identifies him as the Clement that Paul mentioned in Philippians 4:3 as a fellow laborer in Christ,[3] and the mere apposition of the name with a location at one time in Philippi has never warranted saying that he must be a Philippian, as Paul didn't grow up in a place he ministered at, merely for being stationed there.[1] In the 19th century he was identified as a freedman of Titus Flavius Clemens, who was consul with his cousin, the Emperor Domitian, but no ancient sources suggest this identification and it is likely false.[1] The 2nd-century Shepherd of Hermas mentions a Clement whose office it is to communicate with other churches.[4] It should be noted, most significantly, that an allusion in 1 Clement is made back to Paul's comment that Clement's name is in the Book of Life. For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... The Epistle to Philippians is a book included in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Titus Flavius Clemens was a great-nephew of the Roman Emperor Vespasian and brother to Titus Flavius Sabinus IV. Flavius married Vespasians granddaughter Flavia Domitilla. ... This article is about the Roman rank. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... The Shepherd of Hermas is a Christian work of the first or second century which had great authority in ancient times and was considered by some as one of the books of the Bible. ...


Ancient sources sometimes named Clement as the third Bishop of Rome.[1] Little evidence exists to corroborate or disprove that Clement was a Bishop of Rome,[5], and in fact, some historians challenge the assertion that the episcopacy was established as early as Clement's lifetime. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... Episcopacy is the regime of church government by bishops (Lat. ...


The Liber Pontificalis, which documents the reigns of popes states that Clement had known Saint Peter. It also states that he wrote two letters (though the second letter, 2 Clement is no longer ascribed to him) and that he died in Greece in the third year of Trajan's reign, or 100 AD. The Book of the Popes or the Liber Pontificalis is a major source for early medieval history but was also met with intense critical scrutiny. ... St Peter redirects here. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Look up AD, ad-, and ad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Martyrdom

According to tradition, Saint Clement was banished from Rome during the reign of the Emperor Trajan. He was sent to Chersonesus where he was sentenced to work with other prisoners in a stone quarry. Saint Clement arrived to find the prisoners suffering from a great lack of water. After kneeling down in prayer, the saint looked up to see a lamb standing upon a hill. Taking his pickaxe, Saint Clement went to where the lamb had stood and struck the ground, revealing a gushing stream of clear water. For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Chersonesus (Херсонес) is an ancient city on the territory of Sevastopol, in the Crimea, Ukraine. ...


In retaliation for this miracle and for having converted large numbers of the local pagans and his fellow prisoners to Christianity, Saint Clement was martyred by being tied to an anchor and thrown from a boat into the Black Sea. For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ...


According to a 9th-century tradition St. Cyril brought the relics of Saint Clement to Rome where they are now enshrined at the Basilica di San Clemente. Other relics of Saint Clement, including his head, are claimed by the Kiev Monastery of the Caves in Ukraine. See Saint Cyril (disambiguation) for other persons with this name. ... Relics can be: Relics: the remains of saints (usually bones), honored in the Catholic and Orthodox churches. ... The Basilica of San Clemente is a complex of buildings in Rome centered around a 12th century Roman Catholic church dedicated to Pope Clement I. The site is notable as being an archeological record of Roman architectural, political and religious history from the early Christian era to the Middle Ages. ... Roofs of the Holy Trinity Church Kievo-Pecherskaya Lavra, 1890s Kiev Pechersk Lavra (Ukrainian: ; Russian: ), also known as the Kiev Monastery of the Caves, is an ancient cave monastery in Kiev. ...


Symbolism

Saint Clement, by Tiepolo
Mariner's Cross/St. Clement's Cross.

In works of art, Saint Clement can be recognized by having an anchor at his side or tied to his neck. He is most often depicted wearing the Papal vestments, including the pallium, and sometimes with the Papal tiara but more often with the mitre. He is also sometimes shown with symbols of his office as Pope and Bishop of Rome such as the Papal Cross and the Keys of Heaven. In reference to his martyrdom, he often holds the palm of martyrdom. Saint Clement can be seen depicted near a fountain or spring, relating to the incident from his hagiography, or lying in a temple in the sea. The Mariner's Cross is also referred to as St. Clement's Cross in reference to the way he was martyred. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x2623, 792 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Clement I ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x2623, 792 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Clement I ... The Death of Hyacinth Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (March 5, 1696 - March 27, 1770) was a Venetian painter. ... Image File history File links Mariner's_Cross. ... Image File history File links Mariner's_Cross. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ... This article is about the ceremonial head-dress; see also mitre (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... The top of the Popes Cross, standing in the Phoenix Park. ... Saint Peter holding the Keys of Heaven. ... The worlds highest fountain: King Fahds Fountain in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Three traditional fountain features: a low jet, a pair of raised basins, and sculpture with a water theme, here hippocamps (Villa Borghese, Rome) A traditional fountain is an arrangement where water issues from a source (Latin fons... A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... Hagiography is the study of saints. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees For other uses, see Cross (disambiguation). ...


Writings

Clement's best known writing is a letter to the Catholic Church in Corinth, often called the First Epistle of Clement or 1 Clement. The history of 1 Clement clearly and continuously shows Pope Clement I as the author of this letter. It is considered the oldest authentic Christian document outside of the New Testament, and it is the first work to assert the primacy of Rome. The Early Christians is a term used to refer to the early followers of Jesus of Nazareth, before the emergence of established Christian orthodoxy. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


A second epistle is traditionally attributed to Clement, although some modern scholarship suggests it may have been written later. The Second Epistle of Clement is often described as a homily, although in form it closely resembles Paul's Epistle to the Hebrews in its abrupt beginning and in its didactic line of expression. Irenaeus, however, in his work entitled Refutation and Overthrow of the Knowledge Falsely So Called, mentions 1 Clement and includes details about divine punishment that close resemble 2 Clement, suggesting that 2 Clement may very well have been originally appended to 1 Clement. Second Clement, unlike First Clement, may have been intended to serve as a homily, as churches often shared homilies to be read during liturgies. It is possible that the Church from which Clement sent his epistle had included a festal homily to share in one economical post, thus the homily became known as the Second Epistle of Clement. The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... In the Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox Church, a homily is usually given during Mass (or Divine Liturgy for Orthodox) at the end of the Liturgy of the Word. ... St. ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... Saint Irenaeus (Greek: Ειρηναίος), (b. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ...


While 2 Clement has been traditionally ascribed to Clement, most modern scholars believe that 2 Clement was written in the second century based on the doctrinal themes of the text and a near match between words in 2 Clement and in the Greek Gospel of the Egyptians.[6][7] Two Epistles on Virginity were traditionally attributed to Clement, but now there exists almost universal consensus that Clement was not the author of those two epistles. The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament but they are part of the Apostolic Fathers collection. ... The suppressed Greek Gospel of the Egyptians (which is quite distinct from the Coptic Gospel of the Egyptians) written at the end of the 1st century or the beginning of the 2nd century AD, was cited by Clement of Alexandria, whose quotations give us many of the brief excerpts that...


St Clement is also the hero of an early Christian romance or novel that has survived in at least two different versions, known as the Clementine literature, where he is identified with Domitian's cousin Titus Flavius Clemens. For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Clementine literature (also called Clementia, Pseudo-Clementine Writings, The Preaching of Peter etc. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... Titus Flavius Clemens was a great-nephew of the Roman Emperor Vespasian and brother to Titus Flavius Sabinus IV. Flavius married Vespasians granddaughter Flavia Domitilla. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Pope St. Clement I, Catholic Encyclopedia.
  2. ^ Tixeront, J. A handbook of patrology. St. Louis: B. Herder Book Co. 1920. [1]
  3. ^ "Writers of the 3rd and 4th cents., like Origen, Eusebius, and Jerome, equate him (St. Clement I), perhaps, correctly, with the Clement whom St. Paul mentions (Phil. 4:3) as a fellow worker." — Kelly (1985). The Oxford Dictionary of Popes. Oxford University Press, p. 7. 
  4. ^ (Vision II. 4. 3)
  5. ^ Lake, Kirsopp. The apostolic fathers. London: 1912. read online
  6. ^ McBrien (2000). Lives of The Popes. Harper, p. 35. 
  7. ^ Pope St. Clement I, Catholic Encyclopedia.

External links

Roman Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Anacletus
Bishop of Rome
Pope

88–98
Succeeded by
Evaristus
Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope St. Clement I - Ökumenisches Heiligenlexikon (4869 words)
Pope Clement I (called CLEMENS ROMANUS to distinguish him from the Alexandrian), is the first of the successors of St. Peter of whom anything definite is known, and he is the first of the "Apostolic Fathers".
Pope Zozimus in a letter to Africa in 417 relates the trial and partial acquittal of the heretic Caelestius in the basilica of St. Clement; the pope had chosen this church because Clement had learned the Faith from St. Peter, and had given his life for it (Ep.
The church of St. Clement at Rome lies in the valley between the Esquiline and Coelian hills, on the direct road from the Coliseum to the Lateran.
Pope Clement XIV (4309 words)
At the death of Clement XIII the Church was in dire distress.
Clement XIII had hoped to silence their enemies by renewing the approbation of their Institute, "but the Holy See derived no consolation, the Society no help, Christianity no advantage from the Apostolic letters of Clement XIII, of blessed memory, letters which were wrung from him rather than freely given".
The pope was powerless; the few concessions he obtained from Catherine II for the Catholics of her new province were set at naught by that headstrong woman as soon as it suited her politics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m