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Encyclopedia > Pope Celestine V
Celestine V
Birth name Pietro Angelerio
Papacy began August 29, 1294
Papacy ended May 19, 1296
Predecessor Nicholas IV
Successor Boniface VIII
Born 1215
near Isernia, Italy
Died May 19, 1296
Ferentino, Italy
Other popes named Celestine
Styles of
Pope Celestine V
Reference style His Holiness
Spoken style Your Holiness
Religious style Holy Father
Posthumous style Saint


Pope Celestine V (c. 1215May 19, 1296), born Pietro Angelerio, also known as Pietro da Morrone (according to some sources Angelario or Angelieri or Angelliero or Angeleri), was elected Pope in the year 1294. Image File history File links B_Colestin_V.jpg Summary H.H. Pope Celestine V Licensing This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was Pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... Pope Boniface VIII (c. ... A certified copy of the Magna Carta March 4 - King John of England makes an oath to the Pope as a crusader to gain the support of Innocent III. June 15 - King John of England was forced to put his seal on the Magna Carta, outlining the rights of landowning... Isernia (Latin: Aesernia or, in Pliny and later writers, Eserninus, or in the Antonine Itinerary, Serni; Greek: ) is a town and comune in the southern Italian region of Molise, and the capital of Isernia province. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ... Ferentino (Latin: Ferentinum) is a town and episcopal see in Italy, in the province of Frosinone, 65 km southeast of Rome. ... There have been five Popes Celestine of the Roman Catholic Church: Pope Celestine I (422–432) Pope Celestine II (1143–1144) Pope Celestine III (1191–1198) Pope Celestine IV (1241) Pope Celestine V (1294) Category: ... Image File history File links Emblem_of_the_Papacy. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... A certified copy of the Magna Carta March 4 - King John of England makes an oath to the Pope as a crusader to gain the support of Innocent III. June 15 - King John of England was forced to put his seal on the Magna Carta, outlining the rights of landowning... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ...

Contents

Biography

According to tradition, he was born in 1215 in the village of Sant'Angelo Limosano, in Molise, the son of Angelo Angelerio and Maria Leone. Recently, the towns of Isernia and Sant'Angelo in Grotte, have been mentioned as his possible birthplaces. His date of birth has been also assigned to 1209. SantAngelo Limosano is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Campobasso in the Italian region Molise, located about 15 km northwest of Campobasso. ... Molise is a region of central Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... Isernia (Latin: Aesernia or, in Pliny and later writers, Eserninus, or in the Antonine Itinerary, Serni; Greek: ) is a town and comune in the southern Italian region of Molise, and the capital of Isernia province. ... Country Italy Region Molise Province Isernia (IS) Mayor Elevation m Area 17 km² Population  - Total (as of 2001) 653  - Density 38/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Dialing code 0865 Postal code 86090 Frazioni SantAngelo in Grotte, Cagnacci, Pagliarelle, Pizzillitti Santa Maria del Molise is a town...


After his father's untimely death he started to work in the fields. His mother Maria was a key figure in Pietro's spiritual development: she imagined a different future for her deeply beloved son than just becoming a farmer or a shepherd. From the time he was a child, he showed great intelligence, and love for his fellow beings. He became a Benedictine monk at Faifoli in the diocese of Benevento when he was seventeen. He showed an extraordinary disposition toward asceticism and solitude, and in 1239 retired to a solitary cavern on the mountain Morrone, whence his name. Five years later he left this retreat, and betook himself, with two companions, to a similar cave on the Mountain of Maiella in the Abruzzi region of south Italy, where he lived as strictly as was possible according to the example of St. John the Baptist. Terrible accounts are given of the severity of his penitential practices. While living in this manner he founded, in 1244, the order subsequently called after him, the Celestines. For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Benevento is a town and comune of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 50 km northeast of Naples. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Events Births June 17 - King Edward I of England (died 1307) December 17 - Kujo Yoritsugu, Japanese shogun (died 1256) Peter III of Aragon (died 1285) John II, Duke of Brittany (died 1305) Ippen, Japanese monk (died 1289) Deaths March 3 - Vladimir III Rurikovich, Grand Prince of Kiev (born 1187) March... Categories: Regions of Italy | Abruzzo ... St. ... Penance (from the Latin Poenitentia, the same root as penitence, which is English means repentence, the desire to be forgiven, see contrition; in many languages only one single word is derived) is the actual name of the Catholic Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation (formerly called Confession). ... This article is about the year 1244. ... Celestines, a branch of the great Benedictine monastic order. ...


The cardinals assembled at Perugia after the death of Pope Nicholas IV (1288–92) in April of 1292. Morrone, well known to the cardinals as a Benedictine hermit, sent the cardinals a letter warning them that divine vengeance would fall upon them if they did not quickly elect a Pope. Latino Malabranca, the aged and ill dean of the College of Cardinals cried out, "In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, I elect brother Pietro di Morrone." The cardinals promptly ratified Malabranca's desperate decision. When sent for, Morrone obstinately refused to accept the Papacy, and even, as Petrarch says, attempted flight, until he was at length persuaded by a deputation of cardinals accompanied by the Kings of Naples and Hungary. Elected July 7, 1294, he was crowned at S. Maria di Collemaggio in the city of Aquila (now called L'Aquila) in the Abruzzi, August 29, taking the name of Celestine V. He issued two decrees – one confirming that of Pope Gregory X (1271–76), which orders the shutting of the cardinals in conclave; the second declaring the right of any Pope to abdicate the Papacy – a right he, at the end of five months and eight days, proceeded to exercise at Naples on December 13, 1294. Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: , Country Region Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617 ft) Population (July 2006)[1]  - City 161,390  - Density 359/km² (929. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was Pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... The Sacred College of Cardinals is the body of all Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church established by Pope St. ... From the c. ... Alternate uses: See Naples (disambiguation) Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα-Πόλις, latinised in Neapolis) is the largest town in southern Italy, capital of Campania region. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... S. Maria di Collemaggio is a large medieval church in LAquila, celebrated not only for its architecture, but also as the site of the original Papal Jubilee, a penitential observation devised by Pope Celestine V, who is buried here. ... City centre. ... Abruzzo is a region of Italy bordering Marche to the north, Lazio to the west and south-west, Molise to the south-east and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gregory X, né Theobald Visconti (Piacenza, ca. ... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... Papal abdication occurs in the Roman Catholic Church when the Pope resigns his office. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ...


In the formal instrument of his renunciation he recites as the causes moving him to the step, "the desire for humility, for a purer life, for a stainless conscience, the deficiencies of his own physical strength, his ignorance, the perverseness of the people, his longing for the tranquillity of his former life"; and having divested himself of every outward symbol of dignity, he retired to his old solitude.


Celestine V was not allowed to remain there, however. His successor, Pope Boniface VIII (1294–1303), sent for him, and finally, despite desperate attempts of the former Pope to escape, got him into his hands, and imprisoned him in the castle of Fumone near Ferentino in Campagna, where, after languishing for ten months in that infected air, he died on May 19, 1296. Some historians believe he might have been murdered by Boniface VIII, and indeed his skull has a suspicious hole. He was buried at Ferentino, but his body was subsequently removed to Aquila, where it still lies. Many early commentators and scholars of Dante have thought that the poet stigmatized Celestine V in the enigmatical verse Colui che fece per viltade il gran rifiuto, Who made by his cowardice the grand refusal (Inferno, III, 59). Most later commentators, however, refute such an identification and believe Dante might have intended the verse to refer to Pontius Pilate or someone else. Celestine V, like Pope Celestine I (422–432), is recognized by the Church as a saint. No subsequent Pope has taken the name 'Celestine.' Pope Boniface VIII (c. ... Ferentino (Latin: Ferentinum) is a town and episcopal see in Italy, in the province of Frosinone, 65 km southeast of Rome. ... Campania is a region of Southern Italy, bordering on Lazio to the north-west, Molise to the north, Puglia to the north-east, Basilicata to the east, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 30 - Edward I stormed Berwick-upon-Tweed, sacking the then Scottish border town with much bloodshed. ... Pope Boniface VIII (c. ... City centre. ... Dante in a fresco series of famous men by Andrea del Castagno, ca. ... Dante in a fresco series of famous men by Andrea del Castagno, ca. ... Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ... Saint Celestine I was pope from 422 to 432. ...


Although generally deemed a saintly man Celestine V has received some criticism. As mentioned above, in the Divine Comedy Dante might have placed him near the gates of Hell, but not in Hell precisely, because he deemed him indecisive, and also because his resignation led to the reign of Pope Boniface VIII. Others felt that his austere hermit-like life made him naïve and unsuited for the job as Pope. This criticism may be more fair as he himself wished to retire due to the pressure. Others argue the opposite: his abdication of such immense power, wealth, and material comfort, in pursuit of austere, humble surroundings, was a most pious and admirable sacrifice demonstrating Celestine V's profound and rare degree of spiritual fortitude and virtue. Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, in Michelinos fresco. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Pope Boniface VIII (c. ...


Another thing he did which may be noted (it seems to be the only instance in the history of the Church) is that he empowered one Francis of Apt, a Franciscan friar, to confer the clerical tonsure and minor orders on Lodovico (who would later become Bishop of Toulouse), the son of the King of Sicily. However, this decree seems not to have been carried out. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Tonsure is the practice of some Christian churches of cutting the hair from the scalp of clerics as a symbol of their renunciation of worldly fashion and esteem. ... The minor orders are the lowest ranks in the Christian clergy. ... This is a very incomplete list of Roman Catholic bishops of Toulouse. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154...


The life of Pope Celestine V is dramatised in the plays L'avventura di un povero cristiano (The Story of a Humble Christian) by Ignazio Silone in 1968 and Sunsets and Glories by Peter Barnes in 1990. Lavventura di un povero cristiano is a play-novel by the Italian writer Ignazio Silone, published in 1968. ... Ignazio Silone Ignazio Silone (May 1, 1900 - August 22, 1978) was the pseudonym of Secondo Tranquilli, an Italian author. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Barnes, (January 10, 1931–July 1, 2004), was an English playwright and screenwriter. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


See also

For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... The Celestine Prophecy was first published in 1993 and is the work of James Redfield. ...

References

External links

Preceded by
Nicholas IV
Pope
1294
Succeeded by
Boniface VIII



Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was Pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... Pope Boniface VIII (c. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Celestine V - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (840 words)
His successor, Pope Boniface VIII (1294–1303), sent for him, and finally, despite desperate attempts of the late Pope to escape, got him into his hands, and imprisoned him in the castle of Fumone near Ferentino in Campagna, where, after languishing for ten months in that infected air, he died on May 19, 1296.
Celestine V, like Pope Celestine I (422–432), is recognized by the Church as a saint.
The life of Celestine V is dramatised in the plays L´Avventura di un Povero Cristiano (The Story of a Humble Christian) by Ignazio Silone in 1968 and Sunsets and Glories by Peter Barnes in 1990.
Pope Celestine V - definition of Pope Celestine V in Encyclopedia (633 words)
Celestine V, né Pietro di Morrone (1215 - May 19, 1296) was pope in the year 1294.
Many commentators and scholars of Dante have thought that the poet stigmatized Celestine V in the enigmatical verse which speaks of him Che fece per viltate il gran rifiuto, Who made by his cowardice the grand refusal.
Celestine V, like the first of the name, is recognized by the church as a saint.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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