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Encyclopedia > Pope Boniface IV

Boniface IV (ca. 550May 25, 615) was pope from 608 to his death. Events End of the Eastern Wei Dynasty and beginning of the Northern Qi Dynasty in northern China. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Events The Edict of Paris grants extensive rights to the Frankish nobility. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... Events September 15 - Boniface IV becomes pope. ...


Son of John, a physician, a Marsian from the province and town of Valeria; he succeeded Boniface III after a vacancy of over nine months. He was consecrated on either 25 August (Duchesne) or 15 September (Jaffé) in 608. His death is listed as either 8 May or 25 May 615 by these two authorities. The Marsi were an ancient people of Italy, whose chief centre was Marruvium, on the eastern shore of Lake Fucinus. ... In the fictional universe of Robert E. Howards Conan the Barbarian, Valeria is a pirate who has a romantic relationship with Conan. ... Boniface III was Pope from February 19 to November 12, 607. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... Louis Marie Olivier Duchesne (September 13, 1843 - April 21, 1922) was a French priest, philologist, and historian. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Events The Edict of Paris grants extensive rights to the Frankish nobility. ...


In the time of Pope Gregory I, he was a deacon of the Roman Church and held the position of dispensator, that is, the first official in connection with the administration of the patrimonies. Pope Saint Gregory I or Gregory the Great (c. ...


Boniface obtained leave from the Emperor Phocas to convert the Pantheon, Rome into a Christian Church, and on May 13, 609 (?) the temple erected by Agrippa to Jupiter the Avenger, to Venus, and to Mars was consecrated by the pope to the Virgin Mary and all the Martyrs. It was the first instance at Rome of the transformation of a pagan temple into a place of Christian worship. Twenty-eight cartloads of sacred bones were said to have been removed from the Catacombs and placed in a porphyry basin beneath the high altar. Phocas on a contemporary coin Flavius Phocas Augustus, Eastern Roman Emperor (reigned 602-610), is perhaps one of the most maligned figures to have held the Imperial title in the long history of Rome and Byzantium. ... The Pantheon, Rome The Pantheon is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to all the gods of the Roman state religion, but has been a Christian church since the 7th century AD. It is the only building from the Greco-Roman world which is completely... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Events The Pantheon is consecrated to the Virgin Mary and all saints (or 610). ... There have been several notable people named Agrippa, mainly in the ancient world: Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, the Roman who was a friend of Augustus Caesar His three sons: Gaius Vispanius Agrippa (a. ... Jupiter In Roman mythology, Jupiter (sometimes shortened to Jove) held the same role as Zeus in the Greek pantheon. ... Venus is the Roman goddess of love, equivalent to Greek Aphrodite and Etruscan Turan. ... Mars was Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: For the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary, see Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... The word catacomb comes from Greek kata kumbas (L. ad catacumbas), near the low place and originally it meant a certain burial district in Rome. ...


During the pontificate of Boniface, Mellitus, the first Bishop of London, went to Rome "to consult the pope on important matters relative to the newly established English Church" (Bede, H. E., II, iv). While in Rome he assisted at a council then being held concerning certain questions on "the life and monastic peace of monks", and, on his departure, took with him to England the decree of the council together with letters from the pope to Lawrence, Archbishop of Canterbury, and to all the clergy, to King Ethelbert, and to all the English people "concerning what was to be observed by the Church of England". The decrees of the council now extant are spurious. The letter to Ethelbert (in William of Malmesbury, De Gest. Pont., I, 1464, ed. Migne) is considered spurious by Hefele (Conciliengeschichte, III, 66), questionable by Haddan and Stubbs (Councils, III, 65), and genuine by Jaffé [Regest. RR. PP., 1988 (1548)]. Saint Mellitus (d. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... Depiction of Bede from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493 Bede (Latin Beda), also known as Saint Bede or, more commonly, the Venerable Bede (c. ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... Saint Laurence of Canterbury (d. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... The title of Bretwalda was one perhaps used by some of the kings of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain (the so-called heptarchy kingdoms) in the second half of the first millennium AD. Such a king was considered to be the overlord of several Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. ... Ethelbert (or Æthelbert) (c. ... England is the largest and most populous of the four main divisions of the United Kingdom. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... William of Malmesbury (c. ... Jacques Paul Migne (25 October 1800 - 25 October 1875) was a French priest who published inexpensive and widely-distributed editions of theological works, encyclopedias and the texts of the Church Fathers. ... Stubbs is an English surname: Alan Stubbs, English footballer Bruce Stubbs, Canadian politician C. W. Stubbs, 19th century clergyman Eddie Stubbs, American radio disk jockey Frank Edward Stubbs, World War I recipient of the Victoria Cross George Stubbs, 19th century painter Gertrude Stubbs, Canadian outlaw Harry Clement Stubbs, American science...


Between 612 and 615, the Irish missionary Saint Columban, then living at Bobbio in Italy, was persuaded by Agilulf, King of the Lombards, to address a letter on the condemnation of the "Three Chapters" to Boniface IV, which is remarkable at once for its expressions of exaggerated deference and its tone of excessive sharpness. Events Saint Columbanus moves to Italy to establish the monastery of Bobbio (approximate date). ... Events The Edict of Paris grants extensive rights to the Frankish nobility. ... Saint Columbanus (543 - 21 November 615; also Saint Columban), was an Irish missionary notable for founding a number of monasteries. ... Stone arch bridge over the Trebbia river Bobbio is a city in the Piacenza province of the Emilia-Romagna region in northern Italy. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Three Chapters (trîa kephálaia), a phase in the Monophysite controversy, was an attempt to reconcile the Christians of Syria and Egypt with Western Christiandom, following the failure of the Henotikon. ...


"You have already erred, O Rome! — fatally, foully erred. No longer do you shine as a star in the apostolic firmament," Columban wrote.


In it he tells the pope that he is charged with heresy for accepting the Fifth Ecumenical Council (the Second Council of Constantinople in 553), and exhorts him to summon a council and prove his orthodoxy. Despite Columban's letter, it seems not to have disturbed in the least his relation with the Holy See, and it would be wrong to suppose that Columban regarded himself as independent of the pope's authority. The Fifth Ecumenical Council (the Second Council of Constantinople) was a Christian Ecumenical Council that was held in 553. ... Map of Constantinople. ... Events The Ostrogoth Kingdom is conquered by the Byzantines after the Battle of Mons Lactarius. ...


During the pontificate of Boniface there was much distress in Rome owing to famine, pestilence, and inundations. The pontiff died in monastic retirement (he had converted his own house into a monastery) and was buried in the portico of St. Peter's Basilica. His remains were three times removed — in the tenth or eleventh century, at the close of the thirteenth under Boniface VIII, and to the new St. Peter's on 21 October 1603. Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ... The Basilica of Saint Peter from Castel SantAngelo. ... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... (10th century - 11th century - 12th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Boniface VIII, né Benedict Gaetano ( 1235 - October 11, 1303) was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1294 to 1303. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... Events March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James VI of Scotland, uniting the crowns of Scotland and England April 28 – Funeral of Elizabeth I of England in Westminster Abbey July 17 or July 19 - Sir Walter Raleigh arrested for treason. ...


Boniface IV is commemorated as a saint in the Roman Martyrology on his feast day, 25 May. May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ...


During Boniface's reign, the Prophet Muhammad began to preach in Mecca, forming the basis of Islam. Muhammad is a common male name for Muslims. ... This article is about the holy city in Saudi Arabia. ... Islam   listen? (Arabic: al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ...


References

  • Bede. Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum
  • Gasquet, Francis Aidan. A Short History of the Catholic Church in England, 19
  • Gregorovius, Ferdinand. II, 104
  • Hunt, William. The English Church from Its Foundation to the Norman Conquest. Vol. 1. "A History of the English Church", W. R. W. Stephens and William Hunt, ed. London: Macmillan and Co., 1901. 42
  • Jaffé, Regesta Pontificum Romanorum ab condita ecclesia ad annum 1198. Berlin, 1851; 2d ed., Leipsic, 1881-88. I, 220
  • Langen, 501
  • Liber Pontificalis (ed. Duchesne), I, 317
  • Mann, Horace K. Lives of the Popes I, 268-279
  • Mansi, Gian Domenico. X, 501
  • Paul the Deacon, History of the Longobards, IV, 36 (37)

This article incorporates text from the Catholic Encyclopedia, which is in the public domain. The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


External links


The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide...

Preceded by:
Boniface III
Pope
608–615
Succeeded by:
Adeodatus I


Boniface III was Pope from February 19 to November 12, 607. ... For a graphical representation of this list, see list of popes (graphical). ... St. ...


 
 

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