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Encyclopedia > Pony Express
Frank E. Webner, pony express rider c. 1861
Pony Express statue in St. Joseph, Missouri

The Pony Express was a fast mail service crossing the North American continent from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California from April 1860 to October 1861. Messages were carried on horseback relay across the prairies, plains, deserts, and mountains of the Western United States. It briefly reduced the time for mail to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts to around ten days.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1020x1506, 225 KB) Frank E. Webner, pony express rider~ ca. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1020x1506, 225 KB) Frank E. Webner, pony express rider~ ca. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1960x1460, 318 KB) Pony Express statue in St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1960x1460, 318 KB) Pony Express statue in St. ... For the American mail service, see Pony Express. ... For other uses, see Mail (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Saint Joseph (also known as St. ... Sacramento redirects here. ... Homing pigeons have been used to deliver small messages since the time of the Persians. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... Pacific redirects here. ...


By traveling a slightly shorter route and using mounted riders rather than stagecoaches, the founders of the Pony Express hoped to establish their service as a faster and more reliable conduit for the mail and win away the exclusive government mail contract.


The Pony Express demonstrated that a unified transcontinental system could be built and operated continuously the year around — something that had previously been regarded as impossible. Since its replacement by the First Transcontinental Telegraph and Railroad, the Pony Express has entered the romance of the American West. Its reliance on the ability and endurance of the individual riders and horses over technological innovation is part of "American rugged individualism". The First Transcontinental Telegraph was a milestone in the formation of the United States. ... This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1887. ...


In 2006, the U.S. Postal Service trademarked the name "Pony Express". USPS and Usps redirect here. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ...

Contents

Background

The headquarters of the operation was in the Patee House in St. Joseph, Missouri

Founded by William Hepburn Russell, William B. Waddell, and Alexander Majors, the Pony Express officially opened on April 3, 1860. The first trip, westbound, was made in 10 days, 7 hours, and 45 minutes. The eastbound trip was made in 11 days and 12 hrs. Every 24hrs they covered 250 mi. The Pony Express, established a year before the beginning of the American Civil War, reflected the need to provide fast and reliable communication with the West. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2408 KB) Patee House in St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2408 KB) Patee House in St. ... The John Patee House was a hotel at 12th Street and Pennsylvania in St. ... William Hepburn Russell: born, January 31, 1812 in Burlington, Vermont - died, September 10, 1872 in Palmyra, Missouri, Alexander Majors, and William B. Waddel are often credited as the founders, owners, and operators of the Pony Express. ... William B. Waddell (January 4, 1857—?) was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... Alexander Majors (1814 - 1900) was a U.S. businessman, often credited along with William Hepburn Russell and William B. Waddel as the founders, owners, and operators of the Pony Express. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


In 1845,yess it took President James K. Polk six months to deliver a message to the Far West. Messages in those days had to travel around the tip of South America (Tierra del Fuego) or across the isthmus of Panama. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Tierra del Fuego Cerro Sombrero Village, Chile. ... For other uses, see Isthmus (disambiguation). ...


By 1860, the fastest route was the Butterfield Stage line from St. Louis, Missouri, through El Paso, Texas, which took 25 days. It was almost 600 miles (950 km) shorter to deliver the mail over a central or northern route. There were concerns, however, whether these alternatives were viable during the winter snows. The Butterfield Stage, also known as Butterfield Overland Stage and Butterfield Overland Mail was a precursor to todays Information Superhighway in the United States, operating from 1857 to 1861. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... El Paso redirects here. ... The Central Nevada Route (more commonly referred to as the Central Route, Simpsons Route, or the Egan Trail) was a transportation route through the mountains of central Nevada, the heart of the Basin and Range Province. ... Main route of California Trail (thick red line), including Applegate-Lassen and Beckwourth variations (thinner red lines) The California Trail was a major overland emigrant route across the Western United States from Missouri to California in the middle 19th century. ...


In 1854, Benjamin Franklin Ficklin, an employee of the firm of Russell, Majors and Waddell, is said to have first proposed a faster northern route to California Senator William M. Gwin. Russell, Majors and Waddell, headquartered in Lexington, Missouri (the hometown of Russell and Waddell), was one of the biggest outfitters for travelers on the Santa Fe and Oregon trails. The firm operated a vast complex in the West Bottoms of Kansas City, Missouri, and also outfitted the army from its western base at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Benjamin Franklin Ficklin (1827-1871) was a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, Class of 1849. ... Russell, Majors and Waddell was a partnership that operated the Pony Express and other shipping businesses. ... William McKendree Gwin William McKendree Gwin (October 9, 1805 – September 3, 1885) was an American medical doctor and politician. ... Lexington is a city located in Lafayette County, Missouri, United States. ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... The West Bottoms is an industrial area immediately to the west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri at the confluence of the Missouri River and Kansas River. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... In 1827, Colonel Henry Leavenworth established a post on the bluffs overlooking the western bank of the Missouri River to protect the fur trade, safeguard commerce on the Santa Fe Trail and maintain the peace among the inhabitants. ...


In October 1857, Russell, Majors and Waddell faced financial ruin when Lot Smith and his Nauvoo Legion destroyed 54 of their wagons during the Utah War. The Army did not reimburse the firm, and the company began looking for other avenues for funds. In 1859, they bought from Ben Holladay the contract to deliver mail between Leavenworth and Salt Lake City, Utah. Lot Smith (May 15, 1830–June 21, 1892) is a character both of LDS/Mormon history and folklore. ... The Nauvoo Legion was a private militia employed by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Combatants United States Mormon settlers Commanders Albert Sidney Johnston Brigham Young John D. Lee Lot Smith Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Utah War was a dispute between Mormon settlers in Utah Territory and the United States federal government. ... Holladays lions at the entrance to the Corcoran Gallery of Art Ophir Hall now called Reid Hall at Manhattanville College Benjamin Ben Holladay (October 14, 1819-July 8, 1887) was known as the Stagecoach King until his routes were taken over by Wells Fargo in 1866. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ...


On January 27, 1860, William Hepburn Russell wired the firm from Leavenworth that Gwin was supporting a contract for California service on the central route provided that it be delivered in 10 days and be ready to debut by April. They renamed their Leavenworth & Pikes Peak Express to the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company to attempt the feat. is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... William Hepburn Russell: born, January 31, 1812 in Burlington, Vermont - died, September 10, 1872 in Palmyra, Missouri, Alexander Majors, and William B. Waddel are often credited as the founders, owners, and operators of the Pony Express. ... The Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Company was the parent company of the Pony Express. ...


The Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad had just opened in 1859 and was the first railroad to cross Missouri. It was 30 miles (48 km) up the Missouri River from Leavenworth in St. Joseph. It was determined that this would be the starting point for a rapid central mail route to California. Hannibal and St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ...


Alexander Majors and Ficklin assembled 190 relay stations over 1,966 miles (3,106 km) from St. Joseph to Sacramento, along with 50 riders and 500 horses. They completed the task in time for the April 3, 1860, opening. Ficklin later clashed with Russell and quit the business in July 1860. He became one of the incorporators of the Pacific Telegraph Company. Alexander Majors (1814 - 1900) was a U.S. businessman, often credited along with William Hepburn Russell and William B. Waddel as the founders, owners, and operators of the Pony Express. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... In 1861, Benjamin Franklin Ficklin joined Jeptha Wade and Hiram Sibley in helping to form Pacific Telegraph Company. ...


Operation

Pony Express Stables in St. Joseph, Missouri

[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2420 KB) Pony Express stables in St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 2420 KB) Pony Express stables in St. ... The Pony Express Stables in St. ...


Pony Express stations were placed at intervals of about 10 miles (16 km) along the route [2], roughly the maximum distance a horse can travel at full gallop. The rider changed to a fresh horse at each station, taking only the mail pouch (called a mochila, Spanish (from Basque) for "pouch") with him. The Mochila was thrown over the saddle and held in place by the weight of the rider sitting on it. Each corner had a cantina, or pocket. Bundles of mail were placed in these cantinas, which were padlocked for safety. The mochila could hold 20 pounds (10 kg) of mail along with the 20 pounds of material carried on the horse, allowing for a total of 165 pounds (75 kg) on the horse's back. Riders, who could not weigh over 125 pounds, were changed about every 75–100 miles (120-160 km). Included in that 20 pounds were: a water sac, a Bible, a knife, a horn for alerting the relay station master to prepare the next horse, a revolver, and a choice of a rifle or another revolver[citation needed]. Eventually, they took away everything except one revolver and a water sac to cut down on the weight. The riders received $100 per month as pay. Basque (native name: euskara) is the language spoken by the Basque people who inhabit the Pyrenees in North-Central Spain and the adjoining region of South-Western France. ...


Majors had acquired over 400 horses for the project, and these averaged about 14½ hands (1.47 m) high and weighed under 900 pounds (410 kg)[3], thus the name pony was appropriate, even if not strictly correct for all the horses. A Shetland Pony A pony is any of several horse breeds with a specific conformation and temperament. ...


Route

Pony Express map from National Park Service.
The Utah portion of the Pony Express Trail.

The route roughly followed the Oregon Trail, Mormon Trail and California Trail. After crossing the Missouri River at St. Joseph to Kansas, it followed what is modern day US 36—the Pony Express Highway—to Marysville, Kansas, where it turned northwest following Little Blue River to Fort Kearney in Nebraska. Through Nebraska it followed the Platte River, cutting through Gothenburg, Nebraska and passing Courthouse Rock, Chimney Rock, and Scotts Bluff, clipping the edge of Colorado at Julesburg, Colorado, before arriving Fort Laramie in Wyoming. From there it followed the Sweetwater River, passing Independence Rock, Devil's Gate, and Split Rock, to Fort Caspar, through South Pass to Fort Bridger and then down to Salt Lake City. It crossed the Great Basin, the Utah-Nevada Desert, and the Sierra Nevada near Lake Tahoe before arriving in Sacramento. Mail was then sent via steamer down the Sacramento River to San Francisco. On a few instances when the steamer was missed, riders took the mail via horseback to Oakland, California. Image File history File links Ponymap. ... Image File history File links Ponymap. ... Download high resolution version (2200x1699, 73 KB)Image created by monsta coty scott on August 9, 2004 and released in accordance with the GFDL. File links The following pages link to this file: Pony Express Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/April Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/April 3 Categories: GFDL images | U.S. history... Download high resolution version (2200x1699, 73 KB)Image created by monsta coty scott on August 9, 2004 and released in accordance with the GFDL. File links The following pages link to this file: Pony Express Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/April Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/April 3 Categories: GFDL images | U.S. history... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... The Mormon Trail or Mormon Pioneer Trail is the 1,300 mile route that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints traveled from 1846-1857. ... Main route of California Trail (thick red line), including Applegate-Lassen and Beckwourth variations (thinner red lines) The California Trail was a major overland emigrant route across the Western United States from Missouri to California in the middle 19th century. ... U.S. Highway 36 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 1,414 miles (2,276 km) from east-central Ohio to Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. ... Marysville is a city in Marshall County, Kansas, United States. ... For the Jackson County, Missouri river see: Little Blue River (Missouri) The Little Blue River is 450-mile long river in southern Nebraska and northern Kansas that was used by Pony Express horseback riders. ... Fort Kearny was a historic outpost of the United States Army founded in 1848 in the western U.S. during the middle and late 19th century. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... The Platte River, showing the North Platte and South Platte The Platte River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 310 mi. ... Gothenburg Gothenburg is a city located in Dawson County, Nebraska. ... Courthouse (right) and Jail (left) Rocks   It should be possible to replace this fair use image with a freely licensed one. ... Categories: Rock formations in the United States | U.S. National Historic Sites | Nebraska landmarks | Morrill County, Nebraska | Oregon Trail | US geography stubs ... Scotts Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska includes an important 19th century landmark on the Oregon Trail. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Julesburg is a town in Sedgwick County, Colorado, on the north side of the South Platte River. ... Grounds of Fort Laramie Fort Laramie, located in present-day Goshen County, Wyoming in the United States, was a significant 19th century trading post and later a military outpost of the United States Army. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... The Sweetwater River The Sweetwater River is a tributary of the North Platte River, approximately 150 mi (241 km) long, in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... Independence Rock can refer to: Independence Rock in Natrona County, Wyoming, a well-known landmark on the Oregon Trail Independence Rock in Linn County, Oregon This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Devils Gate is a 2003 United Kingdom film directed by Stuart St. ... Split Rock is the name of two townships in the United States: Split Rock Township in Minnesota Split Rock Township in South Dakota It is also the name of some rock formations: Split Rock is a distinctive rock formation on the west side of Lake Champlain. ... Reconstructed buildings at the site of Fort Caspar Fort Caspar was a military post of the United States Army located in present-day Casper, Wyoming (which is named for the fort). ... South Pass (elevation 7550 ft) is a mountain pass on the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Wyoming. ... Fort Bridger Fort Bridger was a 19th century fur trading outpost established in 1842 near present-day Evanston, Wyoming in the western United States. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) The Great Basin is a large, arid region of the western United States. ... The Central Nevada Route (more commonly referred to as the Central Route, Simpsons Route, or the Egan Trail) was a transportation route through the mountains of central Nevada, the heart of the Basin and Range Province. ... This article is about the mountain range in the Western United States. ... Lake Tahoe is a large freshwater lake in the Sierra Nevada mountains of the United States. ... Sacramento is a Spanish- and Portuguese-language word meaning sacrament; it is a common toponym in parts of the world where those tongues were or are spoken. ... The Sacramento River is the longest river in the U.S. state of California. ... “Oakland” redirects here. ...


The First Ride

The rides were scheduled to leave San Francisco and St. Joseph simultaneously on April 3, 1860 although the westbound route has gotten more publicity. No photographs of riders beginning in either direction are known and none are believed to exist.


Westbound

The messenger delivering the mochila from New York and Washington missed a connection in Detroit and arrived in Hannibal, Missouri, two hours late. The railroad cleared the track and dispatched a special locomotive called the "Missouri" with a one-car train to make the 206-mile (332 km) trek across the state in a record 4 hours, 51 minutes — an average of 40 miles per hour (64 km/h).[2] It arrived at Olive and 8th Street — a few blocks from the company's new headquarters in a hotel at Patee House at 12th Street and Pennsylvania and the company's nearby stables on Pennsylvania. The first pouch contained 49 letters, five private telegrams, and some papers for San Francisco and intermediate points.[3] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... “Detroit” redirects here. ... Hannibal is a riverfront city of 17,757 (2000 census), located in Marion and Ralls County, Missouri. ... The John Patee House was a hotel at 12th Street and Pennsylvania in St. ...


St. Joseph Mayor M. Jeff Thompson, William Russell and Alexander Majors gave speeches before the mochila was handed off. There is debate over who actually was the first rider. The ride began at about 7:15 p.m. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Meriwether Jeff Thompson (January 22, 1826 – September 5, 1876) was a brigadier general in the Missouri State Guard during the American Civil War. ...


The first horse-ridden leg of the Express was only about a half mile (800 m) from the Express stables/railroad area to the Missouri River ferry at the foot of Jules Street. Johnny Fry is credited as the first westbound rider who carried the pouch across the Missouri River ferry to Elwood, Kansas. Reports indicated that horse and rider crossed the river; however, subsequently, the courier crossed the river without a horse, getting the mount at a stable on the other side. Johnny Fry (1840-October 6, 1863) was the first official westbound rider of the Pony Express. ... Elwood is a city located in Doniphan County, Kansas (see map). ...


However, the identity of the first rider has long been in dispute. The Weekly West (April 04, 1860) reported Johnson William Richardson was the first rider, See Footnote 358 [4] The Weekly West was started by Frances Marion Posegate in St. ... Johnson William Richardson (1851 Virginia – 1947 St. ...


Nevertheless, The first westbound mochila reached its destination, San Francisco, on April 14, at 1:00 a.m. [4] April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ...


Eastbound

James Randall is credited as the first rider from the San Francisco Alta telegraph office since he was on the steamship Antelope to go to Sacramento. At 2:45 a.m., William (Sam) Hamilton was the first rider to begin the journey from Sacramento.


Closing

This 25-cent stamp printed by Wells Fargo was cancelled in Virginia City, Nevada, and used on a revived Pony Express run between there and Sacramento beginning in 1862.

Although the Pony Express proved that the central/northern route was viable, Russell, Majors and Waddell did not get the contract to deliver mail over the route. The contract was instead awarded to Ben Holladay in March 1861, who had taken over the Butterfield Stage. Holladay took over the Russell, Majors and Waddell stations for his stagecoaches. From March 1861, the Pony Express only ran mail between Salt Lake City and Sacramento. The Pony Express announced its closure on October 26, 1861, two days after the Transcontinental Telegraph reached Salt Lake City. [5] Image File history File links Stamp_US_Pony_Express_25c. ... Image File history File links Stamp_US_Pony_Express_25c. ... An older Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Wells Fargos corporate headquarters and main branch Wells Fargo & Co. ... View of Virginia City, Nevada, from a nearby hillside, 1867-68 Virginia City is a city located in Storey County, Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Sacramento is a Spanish- and Portuguese-language word meaning sacrament; it is a common toponym in parts of the world where those tongues were or are spoken. ... Holladays lions at the entrance to the Corcoran Gallery of Art Ophir Hall now called Reid Hall at Manhattanville College Benjamin Ben Holladay (October 14, 1819-July 8, 1887) was known as the Stagecoach King until his routes were taken over by Wells Fargo in 1866. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The First Transcontinental Telegraph was a milestone in the formation of the United States. ...


The Pony Express had grossed $90,000 and lost $200,000.[6] In 1866, after the American Civil War was over, Holladay sold the Pony Express assets along with the remnants of the Butterfield Stage to Wells Fargo for $1.5 million. An older Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Wells Fargos corporate headquarters and main branch Wells Fargo & Co. ...


Trademarks and logos

U.S. Postal Service trademarked Pony Express logo
The postal service running pony logo used before 1970 was not inspired by the Pony Express as many believe.
Wells Fargo security patch

Wells Fargo used the Pony Express logo for its guard and armored car service. The logo continued to be used when other companies took over the security business into the 1990s. Effective 2001, the Pony Express logo was no longer used for security businesses since the business has been sold.[7] Image File history File links Pony-trademark. ... Image File history File links Pony-trademark. ... Image File history File links PostOffice!.PNG‎ Official seal of the Post Office Department Direct inquiries to User_talk:68. ... Image File history File links PostOffice!.PNG‎ Official seal of the Post Office Department Direct inquiries to User_talk:68. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1100x1316, 179 KB) Wells Fargo Security Services of Pony Express This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1100x1316, 179 KB) Wells Fargo Security Services of Pony Express This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... An older Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Wells Fargos corporate headquarters and main branch Wells Fargo & Co. ... A Rolls Royce armoured car 1920 pattern Railway shop workers built this vehicle for use by the Danish resistance movement near the end of World War II. For tracked, armored military vehicles, see Armored fighting vehicle. ...


In June 2006, the United States Postal Service announced it had trademarked "Pony Express" along with Air Mail.[8] USPS and Usps redirect here. ... The Bass Red Triangle, was the first trademark registered in Britain in 1876. ... Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ...


"Pony Express" is trademarked name used by Freight Link international courier services company in Russia, their logo is also similar to the one trademarked by United States Postal Service with "Since 1860" written under the image. [9] The Bass Red Triangle, was the first trademark registered in Britain in 1876. ...


Legacy

Pony Express statues are in Sacramento; Stateline, Nevada; Reno, Nevada; Salt Lake City; Casper, Wyoming; Julesburg, Colorado; North Kansas City, Missouri; and St. Joseph. The original and most famous is the one dedicated on April 20, 1940, in St. Joseph. It was sculpted by Hermon Atkins MacNeil. It is at City Hall Park. The city has rejected proposals to move it to the park opposite the stables. Stateline is a census-designated place (unincorporated town) located in Douglas County, Nevada. ... Reno redirects here. ... Casper is the only city in Natrona County, Wyoming, United States, although the county is home to a number of small towns and Casper suburbs. ... North Kansas City is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Standing Liberty Quarter has the initial of designer Hermon Atkins MacNeil on its face above the date Hermon Atkins MacNeil (1866-1947) was an American sculptor born at Chelsea, Massachusetts. ...


McGraw Hill and AMERIKIDS USA produced the educational game PONY EXPRESS RIDER in 1996 to teach the value of the Pony Express in helping the Union win the Civil War. The Pony Express helped the Union uncover the plans of the Knights of the Golden Circle.[citation needed] The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. ... The Knights of the Golden Circle (KGC) was a secret society originally founded to promote Southern interests and prepare the way for annexation of a golden circle of territories in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean which would be included into the United States as southern or slave states. ...


Publication

The Century Magazine was first published in the United States in 1881 by The Century Company of New York City as a successor to Scribners Monthly Magazine. ...

See also

The Pony Express Museum is a public museum in Saint Joseph, Missouri documenting the history of the Pony Express, the first fast mail line across the North American continent from the Missouri River to the Pacific coast. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sacramento redirects here. ... Yam is a supply point route messenger system developed by Genghis Khan. ...

External links

References



  Results from FactBites:
 
HistoryBuff.com -- History Library -- Pony Express (493 words)
On April 3, 1860, the Pony Express was launched as a daring private carrier to improve the terrible U.S. Postal Service to California.
The first newspaper carried by Pony Express was a special light-weight edition of the St. Joseph Daily Gazette.
The fastest time recorded was in November, 1860, when Pony riders carried westward the news of Lincoln's election as president on the outside of a letter to the Rocky Mountain News in Denver, Colorado.
pony express: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2842 words)
The Pony Express was a fast mail service crossing the North American continent from the Missouri River to the Pacific coast, operating from April 1860 to November 1861.
The Pony Express demonstrated that a unified transcontinental system could be built and operated continuously the year around – something that had previously been regarded as impossible.
Pony Express stations were placed at intervals of about 10 miles (16 km) along the route [1], roughly the maximum distance a horse can travel at full gallop.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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