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Encyclopedia > Pomona College
Pomona College

Motto: Our Contribution To Christian Civilization
Established: October 14, 1887
Type: Private
President: Dr. David W. Oxtoby
Faculty: 196
Undergraduates: 1548
Postgraduates: 0
Location: Claremont, CA, USA
Campus: Suburban, 140 acres (0.65 km²)
Endowment: US$1.76 billion[1]
Nickname: Sagehens
Mascot: Cecil Sagehen [1]
Website: www.pomona.edu

Pomona College is a private residential liberal arts college located 33 miles (53 km) east of downtown Los Angeles in Claremont, California. The College was founded in 1887 in Pomona, California by a group of Congregationalists and moved to Claremont in 1889 to the site of a donated hotel; its name remained the same. The school enrolls 1,548 students.[1] Image File history File links Pclogo-4c-noborder-pv. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... David W. Oxtoby David William Oxtoby is the ninth and current president of Pomona College. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Claremont is a college town community in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Binomial name Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte, 1827) Centrocercus minimus Young,JR, Braun,CE, Oyler-McCance,SJ, Hupp,JR & Quinn,TW, 2000 The Greater Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, is a large grouse. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Claremont is a college town community in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ... Nickname: Location in Los Angeles County and the State of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Government  - Mayor Norma Torres Area  - Total 22. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...


The founding member of the Claremont Colleges, Pomona is a non-sectarian, coeducational school. Its founders strove to create "a college of the New England type;" but better. In order to reach this goal, the board of trustees included graduates of Williams, Dartmouth, Colby and Yale.[2] Beginning in 1925, the Claremont Colleges, which have grown to include five total undergraduate and two graduate institutions, have provided Pomona's student body with the resources of a larger university while preserving the closeness of a small college. The Claremont Colleges are a consortium of seven schools of higher education located in Claremont, California. ... Sectarianism refers (usually pejoratively) to a rigid adherence to a particular sect or party or religious denomination. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... Williams College is a highly selective [1] private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... Yale redirects here. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...

Contents

History

President Theodore Roosevelt addresses a large crowd outside of Pearsons Hall on the campus of Pomona College in Claremont.

Pomona College was established as a coeducational institution on October 14, 1887. The group wanted to create a college in the same mold as small New England institutions. The College was originally formed in Pomona; classes first began in a rented house on September 12, 1888. The next year, the school was moved to Claremont, at the site of an unfinished hotel. This building would eventually become Sumner Hall, location of the Admissions and the Office of Campus Life. The name – Pomona College – remained after the relocation. The College’s first graduating class consisted of ten members in 1894.[3] For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Los Angeles County and the State of California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Government  - Mayor Norma Torres Area  - Total 22. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Its founders’ values led to the College’s belief in educational equity, and in 1904 graduated Winston Dickson, one of the first African-American students in history to attend Harvard Law School. Like other Congregationalist-founded colleges such as Harvard, Dartmouth, Middlebury and Bowdoin, Pomona was given its own governing board, ensuring its independence.[3] The board of trustees was originally composed of graduates of Williams, Dartmouth, Colby and Yale, among others, to help create "a college of the New England type."[2] Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... Williams College is a highly selective [1] private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... Yale redirects here. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


In the early 1920s, the College’s growth led its president, James A. Blaisdell, to call for “a group of institutions divided into small colleges—somewhat of an Oxford type—around a library and other utilities which they would use in common.” This would allow Pomona to retain its small, liberal arts-focused teaching while gaining the resources of a larger university, shared among other similar small colleges. On October 14, 1925, Pomona College’s 38th anniversary, the Claremont Colleges were incorporated.[4] By 1997, the consortium reached its present membership of 5 undergraduate and 2 graduate institutions. James Arnold Blaisdell (1867-1957) was a minister, theologian and most notably the third president of Pomona College (1910-1927) and founder and “Head Fellow” of the Claremont Colleges (1927-1935). ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Claremont Colleges are a consortium of seven schools of higher education located in Claremont, California. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Pomona's strength has been its quality of education and preparation for graduate and professional schools as well as postgraduate fellowships. In 2007, 24 members of the Class of 2007 were awarded Fulbright Scholarships along with four other alumni,[5] thus making Pomona tied with Brown University for third in the nation and first among liberal arts colleges.[6] Pomona was also named as one of the New Ivies by Newsweek magazine.[7] ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Newsweek Logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and Canada. ...


Campus

Pomona’s campus is located in Claremont, California, covering an area of 140 acres. It includes 59 buildings, including 12 residence halls.[8] The campus in Claremont originally began with the donation of an incomplete hotel—what would become Sumner Hall. It quickly expanded from 7 buildings in 1909—the time James Blaisdell took over as President.[9] He had the foresight to purchase the empty land around the College while it was still available, securing the College’s future and allowing for expansion for years to come. A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... James Arnold Blaisdell (1867-1957) was a minister, theologian and most notably the third president of Pomona College (1910-1927) and founder and “Head Fellow” of the Claremont Colleges (1927-1935). ...


Currently, First Street borders the campus on the south, Mills and Amherst Avenues to the east, Eighth Street on the north, and Harvard Avenue on the west. Claremont Graduate University, Scripps College and Claremont McKenna College are adjacent to Pomona’s north, from west to east respectively. Pomona is divided into North Campus and South Campus, casually divided by Sixth Street, with a few exceptions. Many of the earlier buildings were constructed in the Spanish Renaissance Revival and Mission Styles, usually only one or two stories in height. Bridges Hall of Music, designed by Pasadena architect Myron Hunt, is an example of these styles combined.[10] Later buildings have taken inspiration from these styles, with usually three or fewer stories and stucco walls. Claremont Graduate University (CGU) is a private graduate-only university. ... Scripps College is a liberal arts womens college in Claremont, California. ... A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ... The Spanish Renaissance was a movement in Spain, originating from the Italian Renaissance in Italy, that spread during the 15th and 16th centuries. ... The Mission Revival Style was an architectural movement that began in the late 19th Century and drew inspiration from the early Spanish missions in California. ... Myron Hunt (February 27, 1868–May 26, 1952) was an American architect whose numerous projects include many noted landmarks in Southern California. ... Stucco is a material made of an aggregate, a binder, and water which is applied wet, and hardens when it dries. ...

Bridges Auditorium across Marston Quad

South Campus consists of mostly first-year and sophomore housing and academic buildings for the social sciences and humanities. Among the notable dormitories are Harwood Court, originally a women’s dorm constructed in 1921, and Oldenborg Center, a foreign language housing option for sophomores that includes a foreign language dining hall.[11][12] Also of note is Sumner Hall, Pomona’s first building, Bridges Auditorium (“Big Bridges”)—used for concerts and speakers with a capacity of 2,500[13]—Bridges Hall of Music (“Little Bridges”), a concert hall built in 1915 with seating for 600[10], and Carnegie Building, which houses the Politics and Economics departments. It was originally built in 1929 as a library for the College. Marston Quadrangle is located between Carnegie Building and Bridges Auditorium, one of two quadrangles on campus. The Pomona College Organic Farm is hidden behind The Wash on the southeastern corner of campus. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 325 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pomona College Claremont... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 325 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pomona College Claremont... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... The Pomona College Organic Farm is an experimental Permaculture project located in the southeast corner of the Pomona College campus in Claremont, California. ...


North Campus is also a mix of residential and academic buildings. Most of the academic buildings house science departments. Among the notable buildings are the Richard C. Seaver Biology Building (“Seaver West”), built with environmentally friendly features, completed in 2005[14], and the Lincoln and Edmunds buildings, both completed in 2007. Environmentally friendly, also referred to as nature friendly, is a term used to refer to goods and services considered to inflict minimal harm on the environment. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Lincoln and Edmunds buildings were the first buildings in Claremont to garner a gold certification award from the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Program[15][16]. The two new academic buildings also house the first publicly accessible Skyspace art installation by renowned alumnus James Turrell '65[17][18]. 7 World Trade Center, considered New York Citys first green office tower by gaining gold status in the U.S. Green Building Councils LEED program. ... Satellite view of Roden Crater, the site of an earthwork in progress by James Turrell outside Flagstaff, Arizona. ...


North Campus dormitories house mostly juniors and seniors. Of interest is Smiley Hall, the oldest dorm West of the Mississippi, constructed in 1908.[19] While it is south of Sixth Street, it is still considered a North Campus dorm. Frary Dining Hall, one of two dining halls on campus, is the location of the murals “Prometheus” by José Clemente Orozco, his first work in the US, and “Genesis” by Rico Lebrun. Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Orozco (disambiguation). ...


Also located along the south side of Sixth Street are buildings central to the campus. Smith Campus Center is home to many student services, including a mailroom, The Coop student store and two restaurants;[8] Alexander Hall houses administrative offices. Athletic facilities are located to the south of Sixth Street and to the east of Smiley Hall. The Rains Center is the main athletic facility with a fitness center, gym and locker rooms. Adjacent to Rains Center is Merritt Football Field, Alumni Baseball Field and Haldeman Pool. Other Pomona facilities of note include the student group and lounge in Walker Hall known as the Women's Union, the Sontag Greek Theatre—an outdoor amphitheater, as well as The Farm, an experiment in sustainable farming and the Seaver Theatre Complex, built in 1990 with a 335-seat auditorium, 100-seat experimental theater and several other studios and rehearsal spaces. The Pomona College Organic Farm is an experimental Permaculture project located in the southeast corner of the Pomona College campus in Claremont, California. ... Sustainable agriculture integrates three main goals: environmental stewardship, farm profitability, and prosperous farming communities. ...

San Gabriel Mountains from South Campus

The campus lies less than five miles (8 km) south of the San Gabriel Mountains, on top of the alluvial fans that have come from nearby San Antonio Canyon. The campus is relatively flat, with a slight uphill grade from south to north, because of this. Mount San Antonio (also known as Mount Baldy) is 14 miles (22 km) north of the College and is visible from the campus. The Mount Baldy Ski Lifts is a popular spot for students to ski in the winter because of its convenient location. On clear days, the Chino Hills are visible to the south and San Bernardino Mountains to the east. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 326 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pomona College User:Vter4life User:Vter4life... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 326 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pomona College User:Vter4life User:Vter4life... The San Gabriel Mountains are located in northern Los Angeles County and western San Bernardino County, California, USA. The mountain range forms a barrier between the Greater Los Angeles Area and the Mojave Desert. ... The San Gabriel Mountains are located in northern Los Angeles County and western San Bernardino County, California, USA. The mountain range forms a barrier between the Greater Los Angeles Area and the Mojave Desert. ... An alluvial fan is a fan-shaped deposit where a fast flowing stream flattens, slows, and spreads, typically at the exit of a canyon onto a flatter plain. ... Mount San Antonio, better known to most Angelenos as Old Baldy or Mount Baldy, is the highest peak in the San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California, USA. While not as unique in its landscape as Seattles Mount Rainier, they are similar in being easily sighted for miles around their... Mt. ... San Bernardino Mountains The San Bernardino Mountains are short transverse mountain range northeast of Los Angeles in southern California in the United States. ...


Academics

The Claremont Colleges

Pomona is a member of the Claremont Colleges, and most social activities revolve around the five colleges, or "5-Cs." Pomona College, Claremont McKenna College, Scripps College, Pitzer College and Harvey Mudd College share dining halls, libraries, and other facilities throughout the contiguous campuses. All five colleges, along with Claremont Graduate University and the Keck Institute, are part of the Claremont University Consortium. The Claremont Colleges are a consortium of five undergraduate and two graduate schools of higher education located in Claremont, California. ... A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ... Scripps College is a liberal arts womens college in Claremont, California. ... Pitzer College is a small, highly selective, private residential liberal arts college located in Claremont, California, a college town approximately 30 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. ... Harvey Mudd College is a highly selective, private college of science, engineering, and mathematics, located in Claremont, California. ... Claremont Graduate University (CGU) is a private graduate-only university. ... Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences (short KGI) is a small graduate school in Claremont, California. ... The Claremont University Consortium administers the Claremont Colleges system in Claremont, California. ...


Any student attending Pomona can enroll in up to half of his classes at the other four colleges and can major at any of the other four schools so long as the his requested major is not offered at Pomona. This policy is similar across the Claremont Colleges; it is meant to give students the resources of a larger university while maintaining the positive qualities of a small liberal-arts college.


Over the years, a rivalry has formed between the opposing sports teams: Pomona-Pitzer (P-P) and Claremont-Mudd-Scripps (CMS). In reality, these teams consist mostly of students enrolled at either Pomona or Claremont McKenna, respectively, which has intensified the rivalry between these particular neighbors.


Admissions

In 2007, 15.74% of applicants were admitted to Pomona, the lowest acceptance rate in the college's history.[20] [21] The Class of 2011 has median scores of 750 on the SAT critical reading section (IQR of 700-770), 750 on the math section (IQR of 700-770) and 740 on the writing section (IQR of 690-760). The median composite SAT was 2240. The average ACT score is 32. Eighty seven percent of this incoming class (of those from schools that officially rank students) graduated in the top decile of their high school classes, with 15% being valedictorians.[1] For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ... In descriptive statistics, a decile is any of the 9 values that divide the sorted data into 10 equal parts, so that each part represents 1/10th of the sample or population. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


The body of about 1,550 undergraduate students hails from 47 U.S. states, the District of Columbia and 26 foreign countries. It is composed of 7 percent African American students, 16% Asian American, 11% Latino American and 1% Native American, according to a self-identification survey.[8] Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


Pomona has both need-blind admissions and need-based financial aid policies. In the 2006-2007 academic year, 53% of students received a financial aid package. The average award in 2005-2006 was about $29,700; $24,700 of scholarship and $5,000 of work study and loans. As of December 13, 2007, the College announced it will be among the first colleges nationwide to eliminate loans in favor of grants in financial aid packages.[22] The total cost of tuition, room and board and other fees will be about $43,155 in the 2006-2007 school year.[8] The College’s endowment stands at $1,762,680,000 for the 2006-2007 academic year[1]; it was ranked 39th in American institutions in 2005.[23] Its endowment per student in the 2007 fiscal year was $1,138,888, ranked 6th in U.S. institutions and first among liberal arts colleges.[24] This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... Financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cooperative education is a structured method of combining academic education with practical work experience. ... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... Room and board describes a situation where, in exchange for money, labor or other considerations, a person is provided with a place to live as well as meals (board) on a comprehensive basis. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


Pomona is currently ranked 7th nationally among liberal arts colleges according to the U.S. News & World Report.[25] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Student life

Campus organizations

There are several newspapers operated at the Claremont Colleges, including The Collage and The Student Life, which is the oldest college newspaper in Southern California. Other campus publications include political magazines The Undecided, the Claremont Port Side, and the Claremont Independent; and the literary magazine, Passwords. The Student Life is a student newspaper covering Pomona College and the other college of the Claremont Colleges, a consortium of liberal arts schools in Claremont, California. ...


The Pomona College Queer Resource Center is a student center addressing the needs and concerns of LGBT students at all five colleges. The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ...


The major resource center and student group at Pomona College addressing gender issues is the Women's Union [2].


The campus also has an active environmental group, the Pomona Campus Climate Challenge group, that is focused on tackling climate change and creating a culture of sustainability on campus [3].


There are 3 remaining local fraternities (originally there were 7), and no officially recognized national fraternities or sororities. Two of the three fraternities are for male Pomona students only; membership in the third is open to Claremont Colleges students of any gender.


Residential life

Pomona is a residential campus, and students must apply to live off campus. Virtually all students live on campus for all four years in one of Pomona's 12 residence halls.


South Campus [4] All first-year students live on South Campus. As a result, the four dormitories that line Bonita Avenue are referred to as Freshman Row.

  • Mudd-Blaisdell is Pomona's largest and newest residence hall. It is home to 280 students living in doubles and singles. It is the only air-conditioned dormitory on Freshman Row.
  • Harwood Court houses 170 students. It was built in 1921, is the oldest dorm on South Campus, and the second-oldest West of the Mississippi (after Smiley).
  • Wig Hall has space for 113 students, mostly in doubles.
  • Lyon Court is the only all-freshman dormitory. It houses 78 students, mostly in doubles.
  • Oldenborg Center is home to 140 students, mostly sophomores. Oldenborg residents live in language or special interest halls, and are expected to participate in the Center's extracurricular activities. Oldenborg also contains a foreign language dining hall, which serves lunch Monday through Friday. The Center is air-conditioned.
  • The Cottages are three small, separate housing units on the corner of College and Bonita, in the village. Students fill out a special application to live in the Cottages, which are substance free.

North Campus [5] Most residents of North Campus are juniors and seniors.

  • Smiley Hall is Pomona's oldest residence hall. It was built in 1908 and houses 60 students. Currently, the first two floors of Smiley are home to Unity Dorm, while the third is substance free.
  • Walker Hall houses 112 students in singles and two-room doubles. First-year transfer students live in Walker.
  • Clark I contains two five-person suites, as well as two-room doubles. 116 students live in Clark I.
  • Clark V has space for 95 students in singles and two-room doubles.
  • Norton-Clark III is home to 120 students in singles and one- and two-room doubles.
  • Lawry Court consists of three towers, each of which has three floors. Each floor contains eight single rooms around a lounge and bathroom. 72 students live in Lawry Court.

Unique traditions

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

47

The number "47" has held mystical importance for Pomona students for forty-eight years.[6] Two different stories about its roots exist. Campus lore suggested that in 1964, Pomona math professor Donald Bentley produced a convincing mathematical proof that 47 was equal to all other integers, and that other faculty members and senior students could not disprove his equation at first sight. (By the 1970s oral history had grown this tale into a 1950s McCarthy-era exercise by an unnamed professor, and that it was a symbolic attack on the "big lie" political style of the Red-hunters of the era.) Another version — later verified by Bentley — holds that two Pomona students on a summer grant project in 1964 hypothesized that 47 occurred far more often in nature than random number distribution would explain. Soon the entire school was looking for 47s... and of course they found them! 47 organ pipes in Lyman Hall! 47 eucalyptus trees on College Avenue! Crowds began to cheer at football games when the ball was on the 47 yard line, when basketball game scores for either team reached 47, or when 47 seconds were left on a game clock. Interestingly, Pomona College is located off exit 47 on Interstate 10. 47 (forty-seven) is the natural number following 46 and preceding 48. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ...


Over time the phenomenon built on itself. Alumnus Richard Chamberlain's character in the movie Shōgun drew number 47 in a lottery with a small number of people. The film Absent Minded Professor, filmed at Pomona College, had a final score of 47-46 in the Flubber basketball game. Writer Joe Menosky, a 1979 alum, included the number 47 in the show Star Trek: The Next Generation when he joined in its fourth season: damaged shields fell to 47 percent strength; 47 colonists were missing; 47 minutes would display on a timer. The traditions continued through Deep Space Nine and Voyager. Robert Justman, associate and supervising producer of the original Star Trek series and Star Trek: Next Generation, sent his children to Pomona College in the 1980s. The web link for a full list of Star Trek 47s is below. Richard Chamberlain, right, as John Blackthorne, and John Rhys-Davies, left, as the Portuguese Pilot Vasco Rodrigues in the Shogun television miniseries. ... Shōgun is a 1980 film, directed by Jerry London. ... Joe Menosky is the Star Trek writer credited with starting the trend of trying to work the number 47 into every script. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... In the Star Trek fictional universe, Deep Space Nine (or DS9) is a space station. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ...


Video games, especially those by Intellivision, also displayed 47s regularly on screen and on game boxes. This turned out to be the work of Pomona graduates and Intellivision game designers Don Daglow, Eddie Dombrower and Dave Warhol; Daglow and Dombrower also made 47 the number on the batter's uniform in the seminal Earl Weaver Baseball game from Electronic Arts. Additionally, the main character in the game Hitman is called "Agent 47", or simply "47". The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ... Don Daglow (born ~1953) is an American computer game and video game designer, programmer and producer. ... Eddie Dombrower (born ~1960) is an American computer game and video game designer, programmer and producer. ... Earl Weaver Baseball is a baseball computer simulation game (1987), designed by Don Daglow and Eddie Dombrower and published by Electronic Arts. ... Electronic Arts (EA) (NASDAQ: ERTS) is an American developer, marketer, publisher, and distributor of computer and video games. ... For other uses, see Hitman (disambiguation). ...


The number 47 does indeed hold a bizarre, sublime status in the minds of Pomona students. Exactly why is unknown to most everyone, including Pomona students. However, this is a tradition endorsed by the college, as seen in Pomona College's official website's explanation of the "mystique of 47." [7]


Ski-Beach Day

Uniquely situated in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains, Pomona College takes advantage of its location to host an annual "Ski-Beach Day" each spring. While the origin of this tradition is unclear, professors and various campus staff have noted that it has been around for at least twenty years. Some hypothesize that the day is a salute to other liberal arts colleges, as most of them are on the relatively frigid East Coast or in the Midwest.


Students board a bus in the morning and are driven to a local ski resort where they ski or snowboard in the morning. After lunch, they are bussed down to an Orange County or Los Angeles County beach for the rest of the day. [8]


'Mufti'

Rooted somewhere in the mists of the 1940s, originally the outgrowth of an unhappy group of women students protesting on-campus policies, Mufti is a secret society of punsters-as-social-commentators. Periodically their 3.5x8.5 sheets of paper are glued to walls all over campus, with double-entendre comments on local goings-on: when beloved century-old Holmes Hall was dynamited to make way for a new building in 1987, the tiny signs all over campus announced "BLAST OF A CENTURY LEAVES THOUSANDS HOLMESLESS." Although nominally vandals under constant threat of punishment by the school if caught, Mufti are actually celebrated as part of the school's tradition on the Pomona website. As the school states: "The adhesive used to plaster the sheets over campus is not easily removed, and College administrators have tried many tactics to persuade the group to make their statements less permanent. At one point, former Dean Shelton Beatty offered to post the Mufti fliers himself, just to ensure that the glue would not damage the buildings. A few days after his offer, a stack of Mufti fliers appeared in his locked office. The message simply read, 'Mufti comes unglued.' True to his word, Dean Beatty made his rounds of campus, posting the fliers with a more water-soluble adhesive. However, this compromise did not last. The following week, sheets again appeared with the message, 'Mufti stuck up again.'" [9] For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ...


Fountaining

Also known as "ponding," students celebrating their birthday can expect to be taken by their friends, usually when they least expect it, and thrown into one of the five fountains on campus.


Sagehens

It is a documented fact that one of the monikers used by Pomona College sports teams until 1946 was the Huns[10]. Officially, Pomona joined at this point with nearby Claremont Men's College to form the Sagehens. Today's Sagehen teams are made up of Pomona student athletes and those of nearby Pitzer College. Claremont Men's College (Now Claremont McKenna) students compete with students from Scripps and Harvey Mudd Colleges--leading to a fierce cross-campus rivalry. Popular legend, however, holds that "Huns" was deemed by the administration to be politically incorrect, and that the name was then officially changed to the Sagehens.


According to school legend, the Associated Students of Pomona College once ran a poll in which they asked the student body: "If you could change our mascot, what would you choose?" Several generic options were given (Wildcats, Bears, Tigers, etc.), but in the end, a write-in candidate won: "The Flaming Owls of Death." Unfortunately, "The Flaming Owls of Death" only garnerned a plurality, and not a majority, so the Sagehen mascot stuck. [11]


Senior Week

Senior week is a tradition where, between the end of classes (seniors being excused from taking finals) and graduation, seniors from Pomona College rent houses at Mission Beach in San Diego. During the week they have a good time bonding and hanging out one last time, before the they disperse across the country. A typical day might include lying under the sun, reading, watching tv, perhaps sipping an alcoholic beverage, buying some Skoal Citrus Blend, going upper, volleyball, paddle ball, wiffle ball, napping, cooking, and going on tour. Students from other years are encouraged to come down as long as they are willing to sleep on the floors.


Athletics

The school's athletic program participates, in conjunction with Pitzer College (another consortium member), in the Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and the NCAA's Division III. The school's sports teams are called the Sagehens. On October 6, 1923, Pomona College and USC played in the inaugural game at the Los Angeles Coliseum, with the Trojans prevailing 23-7. Pitzer College is a small, highly selective, private residential liberal arts college located in Claremont, California, a college town approximately 30 miles east of downtown Los Angeles. ... The Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) is a College Athletic Conference that operates in the NCAAs Division III. It consists of eleven small private schools which are located in Southern California and organized into eight athletic programs. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Binomial name Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte, 1827) Centrocercus minimus Young,JR, Braun,CE, Oyler-McCance,SJ, Hupp,JR & Quinn,TW, 2000 The Greater Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, is a large grouse. ... The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is a large outdoor sports stadium located in Exposition Park in Los Angeles, California, near the campus of the University of Southern California. ...


Fight Song

When Cecil Sagehen Chirps
Words by then student, now professor Graydon Beeks '69 and Brian Holmes '68
Music by Brian Holmes


"When Cecil Sagehen chirps, we're gonna fracture the foes of Pomona's might!
When Cecil Sagehen chirps, we're gonna wail on their bods for the Blue and White!
Our foes are filled with dread, whenever Cecil Sagehen flies over head!
We're gonna C, we're gonna H, we're gonna I-R-P, When Cecil chirps his way to victory! Chirp!" Binomial name Centrocercus urophasianus (Bonaparte, 1827) Centrocercus minimus Young,JR, Braun,CE, Oyler-McCance,SJ, Hupp,JR & Quinn,TW, 2000 The Greater Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, is a large grouse. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


"'Push On, Pomona'"


Words and Music by Terry Koenig '13


"Push on, Pomona, to a victory, cheer Pomona's men,
Push on, Pomona, to a victory, for we've got the stuff to win and win again!
Just watch them smash, and crash, their way through ev'ry line,
Show the old Pomona fight!
For all we have to do is stand behind the White and Blue
And we're-------All Right!"


Push On, Pomona was replaced by When Cecil Sagehen Chirps as the School fight song in the early 1970s.


The School Alma Mater

"Hail, Pomona, Hail"


"Hail, Pomona, Hail,
We thy sons and daughters sing
Praises to thy name,
Praises of thy fame,
'Til the Heavens above shall ring
To the name of Pomona
Alma Mater, Hail to thee
To the spirit true of the White and Blue
All Hail, Pomona, Hail!" This article is about the color. ... This article is about the colour. ...


The Alma Mater recently attracted some controversy when it was discovered that the song was originally written to be sung during a minstrel show performed on campus. [26] Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ...


Notable alumni

Pomona College in winter
See also: :Category:Pomona College alumni

Image File history File links Pomona1. ... Image File history File links Pomona1. ... Michael Starbird is a Professor of Mathematics and a University of Texas Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin. ... Chris Burden during the performance of his 1974 piece Trans-fixed where he was nailed to the hood of a Volkswagen Chris Burden (born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1946) is an American artist. ... Chris Cain is a famous alum of Pomona College and is a member of successful indie-rock band We Are Scientists, along with Keith Murray and Michael Tapper. ... “Richard Chamberlain” redirects here. ... Vikram Chandra is an Indian writer who has won awards and critical acclaim for his novels and short stories. ... Rosalind Chao (born September 23, 1959) is an American actress of Asian descent; she is married to voice actor Simon Templeman. ... Art Clokey (born 1921) is a pioneer in the popularization of claymation, beginning in 1955 with a film experiment called Gumbasia, influenced by his professor Slavko Vorkapich at the University of Southern California (known colloquially as USC Film School). ... Alan MacGregor Cranston (June 19, 1914 – December 31, 2000) was a U.S. journalist and politician. ... Roy Edward Disney, KCSG, (born January 10, 1930) was a longtime senior executive for The Walt Disney Company, which his father Roy Oliver Disney and his uncle Walt founded. ... Don Daglow (born ~1953) is an American computer game and video game designer, programmer and producer. ... Eddie Dombrower (born ~1960) is an American computer game and video game designer, programmer and producer. ... Myrlie Evers-Williams (born March 17, 1933, nee Myrlie Beasley in Vicksburg, Mississippi) is an African American activist. ... Dr. Charles Edward Fuller (April 25, 1887 - March 18, 1968) was an American Christian clergyman and a radio evangelist. ... Paul Fussell (born 1924, Pasadena, California) is a cultural historian and a professor emeritus of English literature of the University of Pennsylvania. ... Mary GrandPré is an American illustrator, best known for her work on the American version of the Harry Potter books. ... Chen Han-seng (Chen Hansheng) (February 5, 1897–March 13, 2004) was a Chinese sociologist. ... Garrett Hongo is a Japanese American poet born in Volcano, Hawaii in 1951. ... David West Keirsey, PhD (b. ... Bill Keller (born January 18, 1949) is executive editor of The New York Times. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Douglas (Harry) Leedy, born March 3rd, 1938 in Portland, Oregon is an American composer. ... Doug McConnell is a television journalist who has focused on environment issues, with programs on the air continuously since 1982. ... Joel Albert McCrea, (November 5, 1905 - October 20, 1990) was an American film actor. ... Ved (Parkash) Mehta (Born March 21, 1934) is a writer who was born in Lahore, British India (now a Pakistani city) to a Hindu family. ... Louis Menand (first name pronounced lü-E) is a prominent American writer and academic, best known for his book The Metaphysical Club (2001), an intellectual and cultural history of late 19th and early 20th century America. ... Joe Menosky is the Star Trek writer credited with starting the trend of trying to work the number 47 into every script. ... David Murray (born February 19, 1955 in Oakland, California, United States) is a notable jazz musician. ... Keith Murray (born 1978) is the lead vocalist for the indie rock trio, We Are Scientists. ... Julian Nava (born June 19, 1927) is an American educator and diplomat. ... Lynda Obst is a feature film producer. ... Viveca Paulin (born April 24, 1969) is a Swedish actress. ... Kelly Perine (born March 23, 1969 in State College, Pennsylvania, USA), is an African-American television actor. ... Douglas Preston (born 1956 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is an author of several techno-thriller and horror novels with Lincoln Child. ... Richard Preston (b. ... Stephen Roy Reinhardt (born March 27, 1931 in New York, New York) is a circuit judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, with chambers in Los Angeles, California. ... The atmospheres CO2-concentration Roger Randall Dougan Revelle (March 7, 1909 — July 15, 1991) was a scientist and scholar who was instrumental in the formative years of the University of California, San Diego and was one of the first scientists to study global warming and the movement of Earth... Cruz Reynoso (born May 2, 1931) was the first Hispanic person to serve on the California Supreme Court. ... Seraphim Rose, born Eugene Dennis Rose (August 13, 1934-September 2, 1982), was a hieromonk or priest-monk of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia in the United States, whose writings have helped spread Orthodox Christianity throughout modern America and the West. ... Mary Schmich is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune. ... This page may meet Wikipedia’s criteria for speedy deletion. ... Robert Shaw (April 30, 1916 – January 25, 1999) was an American conductor most famous for his work with his namesake Chorale, with the Cleveland Orchestra and Chorus, and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus. ... James S. Strombotne (born 1934) is an American painter. ... This article is about the screenwriter; Jim Taylor is also an NFL football player. ... Robert Taylor (August 5, 1911 – June 8, 1969), was an American actor. ... William Irwin Thompson (1938- ) is a writer, social critic, and visionary, especially interested in keeping alive the esoteric, most profound, human and spiritual traditions of mankind, as he sees it. ... Towne in the 1960 movie Last Woman on Earth Robert Towne (born November 23, 1934) is an American actor, screenwriter and director. ... Satellite view of Roden Crater, the site of an earthwork in progress by James Turrell outside Flagstaff, Arizona. ... Vladimir Ussachevsky (Hailar, Manchuria, November 3, 1911 – New York, New York, January 2, 1990) was a composer particularly known for his work in electronic music. ... David S. Ward (born 25 October 1945) is an American film director and award winning screen writer. ... George C. Wolfe (September 23, 1954 - ) is an African-American playwright and director of theater and film. ...

Famous dropouts

  • John Cage
  • David Ossman of the Firesign Theatre
  • Twyla Tharp
  • Marianne Williamson, Author and spiritual teacher
  • Frank Zappa Zappa, then a resident near Pomona College in San Bernadino County, would occasionally bring samples of his scores to Prof. Karl Kohn. This was not part of a normal undergraduate program, nor was it some form of school-sanctioned visiting student arrangement, but simply informal private lessons. By 1970, Pomona publications referred to Zappa having studied there, and Kohn's name appears on the cover of Freak Out! (1966) under the heading "These People Have Contributed Materially In Many Ways To Make Our Music What It Is. Please Do Not Hold It Against Them". Zappa contributed to the renovation of Pomona's Bridges Hall of Music, and one of the seats in the hall bears a plaque with his name.
  • Anthony Zerbe

For the Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... David Ossman (born December 6, 1936 in Santa Monica, California) is the oldest member of The Firesign Theatre. ... The Firesign Theatre are a comedy troupe consisting of Phil Austin, Peter Bergman, David Ossman, and Philip Proctor. ... // Tharp in a poster for a performance at the Winter Garden Theatre in New York City. ... Marianne Williamson Marianne Williamson (born July 8, 1952)[1] is a spiritual activist, author, lecturer and founder of The Peace Alliance, a grass roots campaign supporting legislation currently before Congress to establish a United States Department of Peace. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Anthony Zerbe (born May 20, 1936 in Long Beach, California) is an American stage, film and television actor. ...

Hollywood & Pomona College

Over the years, many films and television shows have been shot in and around Pomona College, including:

Pomona College also has many connections to the Star Trek universe. In addition to the incorporation of the college's mystical number 47 [12], a writer for the series who attended Pomona College (Joe Menosky) may have used the Oldenborg Center as inspiration for The Borg, a drone-like race of assimilated half-machine creatures [13]. The foreign language dormitory was popularly referred to as "the Borg" long before Star Trek The Next Generation, and for many years the students who chose to live there had the reputation of never leaving the building except to attend classes (the air-conditioned building has its own dining hall, theatre, library, and computer rooms). Even the cube-shaped spacecraft of the television series is reminiscent of the design of the dorm (which from the air resembles the letter E). Menosky has neither confirmed nor denied the well-reported account. Clara Gordon Bow (July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965) was an American actress and sex symbol who rose to fame in the silent film era of the 1920s. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Marion Davies (January 3, 1897 – September 22, 1961) was an American actress. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... Varsity Show is a 1937 feature film from Warner Brothers about a group of students at Winfield College who butt heads with their faculty advisor while producing an annual stage show. ... Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895–March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Richard Ewing Dick Powell (November 14, 1904 – January 2, 1963) was an American singer, actor, producer, and director. ... Main title caption from Dallas. ... John Derek in the 1980s John Derek (born August 12, 1926; died May 22, 1998) was an American actor, director and photographer most famous for the women to whom he was married. ... The Absent Minded Professor is a 1961 Disney film starring Fred MacMurray as title character Ned Brainard and Nancy Olson as Betsy Carlisle. ... Fred MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an actor who appeared in over one hundred movies and a highly successful television series during a career that lasted from the 1930s to the 1970s. ... For the Marvel Comics character, see Flubber (comics). ... The Fugitive is the name of at least two major fictional fictional works which have been reproduced in a variety of media. ... The Facts of Life may refer to: A US sitcom that ran from 1979 to 1988. ... Mass Appeal is a bi-monthly urban lifestyle magazine based in Brooklyn, New York. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Unfaithfully Yours is a 1948 film written and directed by Preston Sturges and starring Rex Harrison, Linda Darnell and Rudy Vallee. ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... Nastassja Kinski (born Nastassja Aglaia Nakszynski, January 24, 1961) is a prolific German actress, having appeared in more than 60 movies. ... Real Genius is a 1985 comedy film starring Val Kilmer and Gabriel Jarret. ... Teen Wolf Too (1987) is a American comedy film first released on November 20, 1987. ... This article is about the film. ... Jason Kent Bateman (born January 14, 1969) is a Golden Globe-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American actor. ... For other persons named Michael Fox, see Michael Fox (disambiguation). ... For articles with similar titles, see Over the top (disambiguation). ... How I Got Into College came out in 1989 and was directed by Savage Steve Holland. ... This article is about a TV show. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... Gilmore Girls is a long-running, Emmy Award winning, and Golden Globe nominated American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Joe Menosky is the Star Trek writer credited with starting the trend of trying to work the number 47 into every script. ... This article is about the fictional race of aliens. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ...


Majors

A Sign on Walker Wall Welcomes one to Pomona College

Humanities and Fine Arts Image File history File links Pomona2. ... Image File history File links Pomona2. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ...

Natural Sciences This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...

Social Sciences For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... {redirect|Psychological science|the journal|Psychological Science (journal)}} Not to be confused with Phycology. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ...

Interdisciplinary Programs This article is about the social science. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... Foreign affairs redirects here. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous...

American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... // Introduction Asian American Studies is an academic discipline which studies the experience of people of Asian ancestory in America. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... Chicano studies is an academic discipline. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... German studies is the field of humanities that researches, documents, and disseminates German language and literature in both its historic and present forms. ... Foreign affairs redirects here. ... Latin American Studies (sometimes abbreviated LAS) is an academic discipline which studies the history and experience of peoples and cultures in the Americas. ... Media Studies is the study of the constitution and effects of media. ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) is a popular interdisciplinary degree which combines study from the three eponymous disciplines. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Pomona College Profile 2006-1007 (PDF). Pomona College. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  2. ^ a b Rudolph, Frederick (1962). The American College & University: A History. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press. ISBN 0820312843. 
  3. ^ a b History of Pomona College. Pomona College. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  4. ^ History of the Claremont Colleges. Claremont University Consortium. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  5. ^ Pomona College : News@Pomona
  6. ^ New Fulbright Grant Brings Scientists to U.S. - Chronicle.com
  7. ^ America's 25 New Elite 'Ivies' | Newsweek Best High Schools | Newsweek.com
  8. ^ a b c d Pomona Profile 2007. Pomona College. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  9. ^ Anderson, Seth (2007-12-14). James Blaisdell and the Claremont Colleges. Claremont Graduate University. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  10. ^ a b Peterson, William (2002). CB Fisk #117 Pomona College, Claremont, CA. C.B. Fisk, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  11. ^ Residence Halls -- South Campus. Pomona College. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  12. ^ Oldenborg Center - Information. Pomona College. Retrieved on 2007-01-13.
  13. ^ About Bridges Auditorium. Claremont University Consortium. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  14. ^ Richard C. Seaver Biology Building. Pomona College Biology Department. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  15. ^ Winning Gold. Pomona College Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-03-12.
  16. ^ Lincoln Edmunds Receives Gold. The Student Life. Retrieved on 2008-03-12.
  17. ^ Night Rite. Pomona College Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-03-12.
  18. ^ Dedication Held For Turrell Skyspace Exhibition. The Student Life. Retrieved on 2008-03-12.
  19. ^ Residence Halls -- North Campus. Pomona College. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  20. ^ Kaya, Travis. "Once Again, a Record Breaking Class Admitted to Pomona", The Student Life, 2007-04-06. Retrieved on 2007-04-10. 
  21. ^ CMC Class of 2011 Profile. Claremont McKenna College. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  22. ^ Pomona College : News@Pomona
  23. ^ 2005 NACUBO Endowment Study (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  24. ^ Largest Endowments per Student, 2005 (fee required). The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  25. ^ Liberal Arts Colleges: Top Schools (fee required for full access). U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  26. ^ [ http://www.tsl.pomona.edu/index.php?article=2956], accessed 2008-04-01

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... The University of Georgia Press or UGA Press is a publishing house and is a member of the Association of American University Presses. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Student Life is a student newspaper covering Pomona College and the other college of the Claremont Colleges, a consortium of liberal arts schools in Claremont, California. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A member of the Claremont Colleges, Claremont McKenna College is a small, highly selective, private coeducational, liberal arts college enrolling about 1100 students with a curricular emphasis on government, economics, and public policy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Coordinates: 34°05′53″N 117°42′50″W / 34.098, -117.714 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Pomona College (247 words)
Pomona College is one of a handful of institutions in the nation committed to both need-blind admissions and to awarding scholarships and financial aid that meet 100 percent of the demonstrated need of every admitted enrolling student.
These policies enable Pomona to choose its students solely on the basis of educational considerations such as talent, promise and ability to contribute to the campus community while removing cost as a barrier to a first class educational opportunity.
All Pomona College aid candidates must also apply for any state or federal awards for which they may be eligible so that College funds can be made available to as many students as possible.
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