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Encyclopedia > Pomerania
The Duchy of Pomerania, ruled by the dynasty of the Griffins, was a semi-independent principality in the 17th century. Note also the variant coats of arms on this map by Eilhardus Lubinus.
Administrative division of Pomerania
Coat of arms of the Duchy of Pomerania

Pomerania is a collective term used to refer to the three regions of Hither Pomerania, Farther Pomerania, and Pomerelia.[1] It is located on the south coast of the Baltic Sea, divided today between Germany in the west and Poland in the east by the Polish-German border. Pommern can refer to several things: Pommern is a German name for historical region today divided between northern Poland and Germany (The English exonym is Pomerania). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3009x2363, 3161 KB) Summary Map of Western Pomerania (Duchy of Pomerania) from the 17th century. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3009x2363, 3161 KB) Summary Map of Western Pomerania (Duchy of Pomerania) from the 17th century. ... West Pomeranian voivodship since 1999 West Pomerania (Polish: Pomorze Zachodnie, German: West Pommern; Latin Pomerania Occidentalis) or West Pomeranian Voivodship (Polish: województwo zachodniopomorskie) is an administrative region or voivodship in the northwestern part of Poland. ... Pomerania (Pommern Ger) (Pomorze Pol) is a geographical and historical region in northern Poland and Germany, on the south coasts of Baltic Sea on both sides of the Oder River and reaches to the Vistula river in the east and Reknitz River in the west. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 410 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 768 pixel, file size: 339 KB, MIME type: image/png) administrative division of pomerania File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 410 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 768 pixel, file size: 339 KB, MIME type: image/png) administrative division of pomerania File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Pommern_1563. ... Image File history File links Pommern_1563. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Western Pomerania. ... Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern) in yellow. ... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...


While its boundaries have varied, and are somewhat differently interpreted,[2] Pomerania can be said to stretch roughly from Stralsund in the west to Gdańsk in the east, centred on the Oder River delta around Szczecin. Stralsund is a city in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ... Motto: Nec temere, nec timide (No rashness, no timidness) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina GdaÅ„sk Established 10th century City Rights 1263 Government  - Mayor PaweÅ‚ Adamowicz Area  - City 262 km²  (101. ... The Oder (known in Czech, Slovak and Polish as Odra) is a river in Central Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Polish part of Pomerania is divided into three voivodeships: West Pomeranian, Pomeranian, and Kuyavian-Pomerian. The German part of Pomerania is included within the Federal State Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. A Voivodship (also voivodeship, Romanian: Voievodat, Polish: Województwo, Serbian: Vojvodstvo or Vojvodina) was a feudal state in medieval Romania, Hungary, Poland, Russia and Serbia (see Vojvodina), ruled by a Voivod (voivode). ... Capital city Szczecin Area 22,896 km² Population (2004)  - Density 1,694,865 74/km² Powiats  - Urban counties  - Land counties 3 18 Communes 114 Administrative divisions: West Pomeranian Voivodeship (also West Pomerania Province — Polish: województwo zachodniopomorskie) is a voivodeship, or province, in northwestern Poland. ... Capital city GdaÅ„sk Area 18,293 km² Population (2004)  - Density 2,192,000 120/km² Powiats  - Urban counties  - Land counties 4 16 Communes 123 Logo of Pomeranian Voivodeship Sea port in GdaÅ„sk The Sea Towers in Gdynia will be the tallest building (138 m) in Poland outside Warsaw... Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship (in Polish Województwo Kujawsko-Pomorskie) is an administrative region, or voivodeship, in central-northern Poland. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (German: Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) is a Bundesland (federal state) in northern Germany. ...

Contents

Geography

Pomerania is the area along the Baltic Sea between the Vistula, Noteć, Warta and Recknitz rivers. The islands of Rügen, Usedom and Wolin lie along the Pomeranian coast, while the Hel peninsula and the Vistula peninsula jut out into the Baltic. The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ... For other uses, see Vistula (disambiguation). ... Warta (Latin: Varta, German: Warthe) is a river in western-central Poland, a tributary of the Oder river. ... The Recknitz is a river in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in northeastern Germany. ... Map of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania highlighting the district Rügen Rügen (Polish: Rugia) is an island located off the coast of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania in the Baltic Sea. ... Landsat satellite photo of Szczecin Lagoon - Usedom is the western of the two large islands separating the waters of the Lagoon from the Baltic Sea, the eastern island is Wolin. ... Wolin is the name shared by an island located in the Baltic Sea located just off the Polish coast, and a town located on the island. ... Hel Peninsula as seen from Landsat satellite in 2000 Kitesurfing, Hel Peninsula Hel Peninsula (Polish Mierzeja Helska, Kashubian Hélskô Sztremlëzna, German Halbinsel Hela) is a 35-km-long sand bar peninsula in northern Poland separating the Bay of Puck from the open Baltic Sea. ... Categories: Stub | Geography of Poland | Baltic Sea ...


The Baltic forms the Bay of Pomerania, Lagoon of Szczecin, Gdańsk Bay with Bay of Puck, and Vistula Bay along the coast. Lakes Lebsko, Jamno and Gardno were formerly bays but have been cut off from the sea. Bay of Pomerania or Pomeranian Bay (Polish: Zatoka Pomorska; German: Pommersche Bucht) is a basin in the south-western Baltic Sea, off the shores of Poland and Germany. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Bay of GdaÅ„sk (also known as the GdaÅ„sk Bay or Gulf of GdaÅ„sk; in Polish Zatoka GdaÅ„ska; in Kashubian/Pomeranian GduÅ„skô Hôwinga; in German Danziger Bucht) is a southeastern bay of the Baltic sea enclosed by a large curve of the shores of... Puck Bay and Hel Peninsula as seen from Landsat satellite in 2000 Bay of Puck or Puck Bay (Polish: Zatoka Pucka) is a shallow western part of the Bay of GdaÅ„sk in the southern Baltic Sea, off the shores of Polish land of GdaÅ„sk Pomerania. ... Landsat photo Vistula Lagoon Vistula Lagoon (or Bay, Gulf) is the sweet water lagoon on the Baltic Sea that is cut off from Gdansk Bay by the Vistula Spit. ... Lebsko lake is part of Slowinski National Park in Pomerania, Poland. ... Gardno (German: ) is a lake in the SÅ‚owiÅ„skie Lakeland in Pomeranian Voivodship, Poland. ...


Etymology

Pomerania (Polish: Pomorze, German and Swedish: Pommern, Kashubian: Pòmòrze or Pòmòrskô, Latin: Pomerania or Pomorania) means "country by/next to/along the sea." The Polish name, "Pomorze," is literally "seacoast", referring to its proximity to the Baltic Sea. Kashubian or Cassubian (Kashubian: kaszëbsczi jãzëk, pòmòrsczi jãzëk, kaszëbskò-sÅ‚owiÅ„skô mòwa) is one of the Lechitic languages, which are a group of Slavic languages. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...


There is a probable first mention of Pomerania as the Latin "longum mare" ("along the sea") in a monastery document or note from around 1080, the Dagome iudex, shortened copy of an earlier document supposedly referring to the year 992. The document speaks of Oda von Haldensleben and her husband "Dagome", presumably the Polish ruler Mieszko I, and refers to territory gifted by "Dagome" to the Pope. An imperial document of 1046 makes an actual first mention of "Pomerania" in reference to "Zemuzil dux Bomeranorum" (Siemomysl, Duke of the Pomeranians). From then on, "Pomerania" appears repeatedly in the chronicles of Adam of Bremen (ca. 1070) and Gallus Anonymous (ca. 1113). Dagome iudex is the name applied to one of the earliest documents supposedly relating to Poland, which refers to Dago/Dagr of the Norwegian Daglingers, (who was later called Mieszko I), and his wife Oda in 991, placing the land of the Polans with its capital, Gniezno, under the protection... Oda von Haldensleben (sometimes Ote; before 978 - 1023) was the daughter of the Margrave of the North March, Theoderich (or Dietrich). ... Reign ca. ... Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... Gallus Anonymus (Polish: Gall Anonim) living in 11th and 12th century was the first Polish historian, author of Cronicae et gesta ducum sive principum Polonorum (c. ...


Subdivisions of Pomerania

In the German tradition Pomerania is often divided into:

  1. Vorpommern (Hither Pomerania or Western Pomerania, on the left bank of the Oder river)
  2. Hinterpommern (Further Pomerania or Easten Pommerania, on its right bank).
  3. Pommerellen (Pomerelia), bordering and overlapping with West Prussia. The German term Pommern, and therefore pre-1945 references to Pomerania as well as present German understanding of that term, does in contrast to Polish Pomorze not include Pommerellen/Pomerelia in the vast majorities of its meanings. Some confusion can come about as today there are provinces both using the term Western Pomerania in both Germany and Poland due to their respective historical interpetations of the history of the region.

Polish terminology divides Pomerania into: The Oder (or Odra) River (German: Oder, Polish/Czech: Odra, Ancient Latin: Viadua, Viadrus, Medieval Latin: Odera, Oddera) is a river in Central Europe (mostly in Poland). ... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ... One of four districts of East Prussia in 1920 - 1938. ...

  1. Pomorze Zachodnie, Pomorze Szczecińskie, or Pomorze Nadodrzańskie (Western Pomerania, the entire area of the former Duchy and Province of Pomerania)
  2. Pomorze Wschodnie or Pomorze Gdańskie (Pomerelia).

The former covers roughly the territories referred to in German as Vorpommern and Hinterpommern, the latter corresponds to Pommerellen (Pomerelia). Under Polish administration a number of several different voivodeships all using the name Pomerania have been established. West Pomeranian voivodship since 1999 West Pomerania (Polish: Pomorze Zachodnie, German: West Pommern; Latin Pomerania Occidentalis) or West Pomeranian Voivodship (Polish: województwo zachodniopomorskie) is an administrative region or voivodship in the northwestern part of Poland. ... Pomerania and the other Provinces of Prussia in the German Empire. ... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ... A Voivodship (also voivodeship, Romanian: Voievodat, Polish: Województwo, Serbian: Vojvodstvo or Vojvodina) was a feudal state in medieval Romania, Hungary, Poland, Russia and Serbia (see Vojvodina), ruled by a Voivod (voivode). ...


Kashubian geographic terminology with regard to Pomerania is similar to Polish, and distinguishes between Zôpadnô Pòmòrskô (Western Pomerania) and Pòrénkòwô Pòmòrskô (Eastern Pomerania). Kashubian or Cassubian (Kashubian: kaszëbsczi jãzëk, pòmòrsczi jãzëk, kaszëbskò-sÅ‚owiÅ„skô mòwa) is one of the Lechitic languages, which are a group of Slavic languages. ...


Demographics

Polish Voivodeship/
German Kreis
Capitals Registration
plates
Area
w km²
Population
Polish 31 December 1999
German 2001
Territorial code
Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship Bydgoszcz¹
Toruń²
C 17,969.72 2,100,771 04
Pomeranian Voivodeship Gdańsk G 18,292.88 2,192,268 22
West Pomeranian Voivodeship Szczecin Z 22,901.48 1,732,838 32
(¹) - the site of the Voivod office. (²) - the site of the Voivod council
Polish Pomerania total     59,164.08 6,025,877  
Nordvorpommern Grimmen NPV 2,168 117,722  
Ostvorpommern Anklam OVP 1,910 113,623  
Rügen Bergen auf Rügen RÜG 974 74,400  
Uecker-Randow Pasewalk UER 1,624 83,459  
Demmin (district) Demmin DM 1,921 93,700  
Greifswald   HGW 52.2 52,984  
Stralsund   HST est. 52.2 60,000  
German Pomerania total     8,701 595,888  

The biggest cities are (with population figures for 1999): is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship (in Polish Województwo Kujawsko-Pomorskie) is an administrative region, or voivodeship, in central-northern Poland. ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina Bydgoszcz Established before 1238 City Rights 1346/1349 Government  - Mayor Konstanty Dombrowicz Area  - City 174. ... Motto: Durabo (lat. ... Capital city GdaÅ„sk Area 18,293 km² Population (2004)  - Density 2,192,000 120/km² Powiats  - Urban counties  - Land counties 4 16 Communes 123 Logo of Pomeranian Voivodeship Sea port in GdaÅ„sk The Sea Towers in Gdynia will be the tallest building (138 m) in Poland outside Warsaw... Motto: Nec temere, nec timide (No rashness, no timidness) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina GdaÅ„sk Established 10th century City Rights 1263 Government  - Mayor PaweÅ‚ Adamowicz Area  - City 262 km²  (101. ... Capital city Szczecin Area 22,896 km² Population (2004)  - Density 1,694,865 74/km² Powiats  - Urban counties  - Land counties 3 18 Communes 114 Administrative divisions: West Pomeranian Voivodeship (also West Pomerania Province — Polish: województwo zachodniopomorskie) is a voivodeship, or province, in northwestern Poland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nordvorpommern (North Western Pomerania) is a Kreis (district) in the northern part of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ... Grimmen is a town in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, capital of the Nordvorpommern district. ... Ostvorpommern is a Kreis (district) in the eastern part of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ... Map of Germany showing Anklam Anklam or Anclam is a town in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany, situated on the banks of the Peene river, 8 km from its mouth in the Kleines Haff, and 85 km northwest of Stettin, on the railway to Stralsund. ... Map of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania highlighting the district Rügen Rügen (Polish: Rugia) is an island located off the coast of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania in the Baltic Sea. ... Bergen auf Rügen (dark red) in Bergen auf Rügen Amt (light red) in Rügen district (grey) Bergen auf Rügen is the district seat (Kreisstadt) of Rügen in the middle of the island of Rügen in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany. ... Uecker-Randow is a Kreis (district) in the eastern part of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ... Pasewalk (IPA: ) is a town in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in Germany. ... Demmin is a district in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ... Demmin (Polish: Dymin)is a town in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, capital of the district Demmin. ... Greifswald (from German Greif, griffin, and Wald, forest) is a town in northeastern Germany. ... Stralsund is a city in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ...

in Polish Pomerania

and Świnoujście, Kołobrzeg, Sopot, Malbork, Kwidzyn, Szczecinek, Lębork, Chojnice, Iława, Ostróda, Police, Wałcz Map of the Tricity area Tricity (also called Treble City, in Polish Trójmiasto) is the city area consisting of the three Polish district GdaÅ„sk, Gdynia and Sopot. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: Nec temere, nec timide (No rashness, no timidness) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina GdaÅ„sk Established 10th century City Rights 1263 Government  - Mayor PaweÅ‚ Adamowicz Area  - City 262 km²  (101. ... Gdynia (IPA: , German: (until 1939 and after 1945) / Gotenhafen (1939-1945); Kashubian: ) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship of Poland and an important seaport at GdaÅ„sk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea. ... Sopot (pronounce: [sÉ”pÉ”t]; German: ; Kashubian: Sopòt) is a seaside town in Eastern Pomerania on the southern coast of the Baltic Sea in northern Poland, with a population of approximately 40,000. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina Bydgoszcz Established before 1238 City Rights 1346/1349 Government  - Mayor Konstanty Dombrowicz Area  - City 174. ... Motto: Durabo (lat. ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship West Pomeranian Powiat City County Gmina Koszalin Estabilished 11th century City Rights 1266 Government  - Mayor MirosÅ‚aw MikietyÅ„ski Area  - City 83 km²  (32 sq mi) Population (2006)  - City 106,125  - Density 1,265/km² (3,276. ... SÅ‚upsk ( ; former German: , occasionally Stolpe; Kashubian and Pomeranian: Stolpsk; Latin: Stolpe) is a city with approximately 100,000 inhabitants in northwestern Poland. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Stargard SzczeciÅ„ski (-Polish, Kashubian/Pomeranian: Stôrgard, German: ) is a town in Pomerania, northwestern Poland, with 73,000 inhabitants (1995). ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship West Pomeranian Powiat City County Gmina ÅšwinoujÅ›cie Estabilished 12th century City Rights 1765 Government  - Mayor Janusz Å»murkiewicz Area  - City 197 km²  (76. ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship West Pomeranian Powiat KoÅ‚obrzeg County Gmina KoÅ‚obrzeg Estabilished 10th century City Rights 1255 Government  - Mayor Janusz Gromek Area  - Town 25. ... Sopot (pronounce: [sÉ”pÉ”t]; German: ; Kashubian: Sopòt) is a seaside town in Eastern Pomerania on the southern coast of the Baltic Sea in northern Poland, with a population of approximately 40,000. ... Malbork Castle 2003. ... For other places called Marienwerder, see Marienwerder (disambiguation) Kwidzyn (German: ) is a town in northern Poland on the Liwa River, with 40,008 inhabitants (2004). ... Szczecinek (German: ; Kashubian: ) is a town in Middle Pomerania, northwestern Poland with some 40,000 inhabitants. ... LÄ™bork (Kashubian/Pomeranian: Lãbórg; German Lauenburg) is a town (town 1341) on the rivers Leba and Okalica in Middle Pomerania region, north-western Poland with some 37,000 inhabitants. ... Chojnice is a town in northern Poland with 40,600 inhabitants (2000), near famous Tuchola Forests, Lake Charzykowskie and many other water reservoirs. ... Motto: none Voivodship Warmia i Mazury Municipal government Rada Miejska IÅ‚awy Mayor JarosÅ‚aw MaÅ›kiewicz Area 22 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 34 000 - 1545/km² Founded City rights - - Latitude Longitude 53°36 N 19°34 E Area code +48 89 Car plates NIL Twin towns - Municipal Website... Ostróda Ostróda (former German: ) is a town in Ostróda County in the Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship in Poland, with 33,603 inhabitants as of January 1, 2005. ... WaÅ‚cz is a county town in northwestern Poland with approx. ...

in German Pomerania

Greifswald (from German Greif, griffin, and Wald, forest) is a town in northeastern Germany. ... Stralsund is a city in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. ... Wolgast is a German town in the district of Ostvorpommern, in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, on the bank of the river Peene (12. ... Barth can mean: Barth (Pomerania), a town in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany Barth (name), a Germanic family name Barth (character), a character from the television show You Cant Do That On Television. Edgar Barth (1917-1965), a German race car driver Fredrik Barth (1928- ), a Norwegian anthropologist Heinrich Barth...

History of Pomerania

Main article: History of Pomerania
Historic Pomerania (outlined in yellow) on the background of modern country borders. The map outlines the pre-1946 German Province of Pomerania; Kashubia, known as Eastern Pomerania or Pomerelia, is not included.

// Historical administrative divisions Eastern Pomerania Removed Free City of Danzig, left bank of Vistula river and Grenzmark Posen-Westpreussen Pomeranian Voivodship 1920-1938 Added Bydgoszcz county 1938 Pomeranian Voivodship 1938-1939 added Free City of Gdansk Danzig-Westpreussen 1939-1945 . ... Image File history File links Pomeraniamap. ... Image File history File links Pomeraniamap. ... Pomerania and the other Provinces of Prussia in the German Empire. ... Kashubians, Kassubians, or Cassubians (Kashubian: Kaszëbi) are a Slavic ethnic group living in modern-day northwestern Poland. ... Eastern Pomerania (also Pomerelia, East Pomerania, Gdańsk Pomerania, Vistula Pomerania, Polish: , German: ), is a geographical and historical region in the east of Pomerania in northern Poland. ... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ...

Timeline

The history of the region is rich and varied, probably due to its having been fragmented into several independent duchies through the centuries.

(Redirected from 2000 BC) (21st century BC - 20th century BC - 19th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 2064 - 1986 BC -- Twin Dynasty wars in Egypt 2000 BC -- Farmers and herders travel south from Ethiopia and settle in Kenya. ... The Baltic Sea The Balts or Baltic peoples have lived around the eastern coast of Mare Suebicum, or Baltic Sea (Tacitus, AD 98) since ancient times. ... (Redirected from 1200 BC) Centuries: 14th century BC - 13th century BC - 12th century BC Decades: 1250s BC 1240s BC 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC - 1200s BC - 1190s BC 1180s BC 1170s BC 1160s BC 1150s BC Events and Trends 1204 BC - Theseus, legendary King of Athens is deposed after... Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... The Rugians (Latin rugii) were an East Germanic tribe whose ultimate origins have been traced to Rogaland in Norway, whose population probably was the Rugii that Jordanes mentioned as a tribe that still remained in Scandza. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Gothiscandza was according to the 6th century Goth scholar Jordanes, the first settlement of the Goths after their migration from Scandinavia (Scandza). ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Wolin is the name shared by an island located in the Baltic Sea located just off the Polish coast, and a town located on the island. ... The Veleti (German: ; Polish: ), also known as the Liutizians (also Liutizi, Lyutitzi, or Liutitians; German: Liutizen or Lutizen) or Wilzi(ans) (also Wiltzes; German: Wilzen), were a group of medieval West Slavic tribes within the territory of modern northeastern Germany (see Polabian Slavs). ... The Duchy of Saxony was a medieval Duchy covering the greater part of Northern Germany. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... A warlord is a person with power who has de facto military control of a subnational area due to armed forces loyal to the warlord and not to a central authority. ... Harald being baptized by Poppo the monk, probably c. ... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ... Reign From c. ... The Oder (or Odra) River (German: Oder, Polish/Czech: Odra, Ancient Latin: Viadua, Viadrus, Medieval Latin: Odera, Oddera) is a river in Central Europe (mostly in Poland). ... For other uses, see Vistula (disambiguation). ... The Kingdom of Poland of the first Piasts was the Polish state in the years between the coronation of BolesÅ‚aw I the Brave in 1025 and the death of BolesÅ‚aw III the Wrymouth in 1138. ... Casimir I on Jan Matejkos painting Casimir I, the Restorer (Polish: Kazimierz I Odnowiciel) (1015-1058), duke of Poland, was the son of Mieszko II of Poland and Rixa von Lothringen. ... Siemomysl of Pomerania (fl. ... Meißen, internationally most known for porcelain, is a town of approximately 35,000 near Dresden on the river Elbe in the State of Saxony in the southern part of eastern Germany. ... A tribute (from Latin tribulum, contribution) is wealth one party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often case in historical contexts, of submission or allegiance. ... BolesÅ‚aw III Wrymouth. ... Statue of Absalon in Copenhagen Absalon (c. ... Map of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania highlighting the district Rügen Rügen (Polish: Rugia) is an island located off the coast of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania in the Baltic Sea. ... Wolin is the name shared by an island located in the Baltic Sea located just off the Polish coast, and a town located on the island. ... Bornhöved is a municipality in the district of Segeberg, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... Coat of arms of the House of Pomerania depicting a griffin. ... The House of SobiesÅ‚aw (Polish: , German: ) was a dynasty which ruled from 1155 to 1294 in Pomerelia, a country which is also known as Eastern Pomerania or West Prussia. ... Pomerania (Pommern Ger) (Pomorze Pol) is a geographical and historical region in northern Poland and Germany, on the south coasts of Baltic Sea on both sides of the Oder River and reaches to the Vistula river in the east and Reknitz River in the west. ... Seal of the Duchy of Masovia. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Albert I (c. ... Henry the Lion (statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral). ... Coat of arms of the House of Pomerania depicting a griffin. ... Frederick Barbarossa in a 13th century chronicle. ... Coat of arms Capital Königsberg (Kaliningrad) Religion Roman Catholicism Government Principality Hochmeister (Grand Master)  - 1209–39 Hermann von Salza  - 1510–25 Albert of Brandenburg-Ansbach Historical era Middle Ages  - Northern Crusades 1224  - Absorbed Livonia 1237  - Purchased Neumark 1404  - Hanseatic cities¹ leave, found Prussian Confed. ... Coat of arms Capital Brandenburg Berlin (from 1417) Religion Roman Catholic Lutheran Calvinist Government Monarchy Margrave  - 1157–70 Albert I  - 1797–1806 Frederick William III History  - Margraviate established 3 October, 1157  - Electorate established 25 December 1356  - Brandenburg-Prussia 27 August 1618  - Kingdom of Prussia 1 January 1701  - Dissolution of the... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ... The Second Treaty of ToruÅ„ or the Second Treaty of Thorn, (also Peace of ToruÅ„ 1466; German: , Polish: ) was a peace treaty signed in the Hanseatic city of ToruÅ„ (Thorn) on October 19, 1466 between the Polish king, the Prussian cities, and the duke of Pomerania on one side, and... Teutonic Knights, charging into battle. ... Map of Royal Prussia (light pink) History  - Established October 19, 1466  - Loss of autonomy 1 July 1569  - Annexed August 5, 1772 Royal Prussia (German: ; Polish: ) was a province of the Kingdom of Poland and then the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1772. ... Ratification of the Treaty of Münster. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Western Pomerania. ... Swedish Pomerania (Swedish: Svenska Pommern) was a Dominion under the Swedish Crown from the 17th to the 19th century, situated on the German Baltic Sea coast. ... The Brandenburg-Prussian state was formed in 1618 when the Duchy of Prussia came under the control of the Elector of Brandenburg (part of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was the association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a peace treaty which officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... Anthem: Mazurek DÄ…browskiego Capital Warsaw Language(s) Polish Government Republic President List Prime minister List Legislature Sejm Historical era Interwar period  - World War I November 11, 1918  - Invasion November 2, 1939 Area  - 1939 388,600 km2 150,039 sq mi Population  - 1939 est. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... “CCCP” redirects here. ... The Oder-Neisse line (Polish: , German: ) marked the border between German Democratic Republic and Poland between 1950 and 1990. ... The name Mecklenburg derives from a castle named Mikilenburg (Old German: big castle), located between the cities of Schwerin and Wismar. ...

Prehistoric times, Germanic and Slavic tribes

20,000 years ago the territory of present-day Pomerania was covered with ice, which did not start to recede until the late period of the Old Stone Age or Paleolithic some 10,000 years BC, when the Scandinavian glacier receded to the north. Various archaeological cultures developed in the Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Iron Age. The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic (Greek παλαιός paleos=old and λίθος lithos=stone or the Old Stone Age) was the first period in the development of human technology of the Stone Age. ... // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geological formation. ... The Mesolithic (Greek mesos=middle and lithos=stone or the Middle Stone Age[1]) was a period in the development of human technology between the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods of the Stone Age. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ...


Initially at least part of Pomerania was dominated by Baltic tribes. Since around 500BC and before 500 AD Pomerania was dominated by East Germanic tribes including several tribes of Goths, who according to archeological evidence and their own tradition have come from Scandinavia. Goths and Rugians are recorded by Roman historians in the areas of Pomerania in 98 AD. The Veneti, non-Germanic tribe, which later assimilated with Slavs, are recorded by Ptolemy and Pliny the Elder around Vistula in first century AD. By the 7th century Slavic tribes (Wends) such as the Pomeranians settled the area. The Baltic Sea The Balts or Baltic peoples are a group of Indo-European tribes who settled the area between lower Vistula and upper Dvina and Dneper. ... The tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. In historical times these tribes were differentiated as Goths, Burgundians and Vandals among others. ... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... Areas in the first half of the 3rd century: Wielbark culture (red) , Przeworsk culture (green), a Baltic culture (Aesti?, yellow), Dębczyn culture (pink) and the Roman Empire (purple) Wielbark culture (German: , Polish: , Ukrainian Ukrainian: ) was an archaeological culture identified with the Goths which appeared during the first half of... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... The Rugians (Latin rugii) were an East Germanic tribe whose ultimate origins have been traced to Rogaland in Norway, whose population probably was the Rugii that Jordanes mentioned as a tribe that still remained in Scandza. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... This article is about the Veneti of the Vistula River basin. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Vend redirects here. ... Pomeranians (Pomorzanie) are a group of Slavic tribes living in historical region of Pomerania along the shore of Baltic Sea between Oder and Vistula rivers. ...

See also: Balts, East Germanic tribes, Lusatian culture, Pomeranian culture, Wielbark Culture, Goths, Rugians, and Kashubians

http://www. ... The Germanic tribes referred to as East Germanic constitute a wave of migrants who may have moved from Scandinavia into the area between the Oder and Vistula rivers between 600 - 300 BC. Later they went to the south. ... A simplified map of the central European cultures, ca 1200 BC. The purple area is the Lusatian culture, the central blue area is the Knoviz culture, the red area is the central urnfield culture, and the orange area is the northern urnfield culture. ... The Pommeranian culture is an Iron Age culture in Poland. ... Areas in the first half of the 3rd century: Wielbark culture (red) , Przeworsk culture (green), a Baltic culture (Aesti?, yellow), Dębczyn culture (pink) and the Roman Empire (purple) Wielbark culture (German: , Polish: , Ukrainian Ukrainian: ) was an archaeological culture identified with the Goths which appeared during the first half of... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... The Rugians (Latin rugii) were an East Germanic tribe whose ultimate origins have been traced to Rogaland in Norway, whose population probably was the Rugii that Jordanes mentioned as a tribe that still remained in Scandza. ... Kashubians, Kassubians, or Cassubians (Kashubian: Kaszëbi) are a Slavic ethnic group living in modern-day northwestern Poland. ...

Pomerania as a part of Poland, Denmark and Germany; German settlement

Pomerania was first conquered by the Polish duke Mieszko I in the second half of the 10th century. Pagan uprisings in 1005 and 1038 resulted in independancy for Western Pomerania and Pomerelia, respectively. Regained by Poland in 1116/1121, the Polish could not hold the Pomeranian duchy longer than 1135, whereas Pomerelia after the 1138 partition of Poland among the sons of Boleslaus Wrymouth became a part of the Polish seniorat (see Map of Poland before the fragmentation period) which was declared fief of the Holy Roman Empire in 1156. Reign ca. ... Bolesław III Wrymouth. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Events Prince Yuriy Dolgorukiy fortifies Moscow, regarded as the date of the founding of the city Establishment of the Carmelite Order Hogen Rebellion in Japan January 20 - According to legend, freeholder Lalli slays English crusader Bishop Henry with an axe on the ice of the lake Köyliönjärvi...


The Western part, the Duchy of Pomerania, was declared part of the Holy Roman Empire (1181). After a brief period of Danish rule (1168/1186-1227), it remained part of Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation until 1806. This article is about the medieval empire. ... The Holy Roman Empire should not be mistaken for the Roman Empire (31 B.C.–A.D. 476). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The Eastern part, Pomerelia, which was directly part of Kingdom of Poland, was disputed by Brandenburg and conquered by the Teutonic Knights in 1309, becoming part of the Teutonic Order state. After the rebellion of the Prussian Confederation, it was then annexed by the Kingdom of Poland in 1466 as a province with considerable autonomy. This part of Pomerelia and Prussia was centuries later referred to as "Royal Prussia". In 1569 the province agreed to sacrifice part of its autonomy to join the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth as the new entity to unify lands of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. In the first centuries of its existence, the Polish nation was led by a series of strong rulers who converted the Poles to Christendom, created a strong Central European state, and integrated Poland into European culture. ... For the state, see Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. ... Teutonic Knights, charging into battle. ... On February 21, 1440, a group made up of individuals from the Prussian cities, gentry and clergy, formed the Prussian Confederation (German Preussischer Bund, Polish: ZwiÄ…zek Pruski), under the leadership of the big cities Gdansk, Elblag, and Torun. ... The Jagiellon Era 1385-1569, was dominated by the union of Poland with Lithuania under the Jagiellon Dynasty, founded by the Lithuanian grand duke Jagiello. ... Map of Royal Prussia (light pink) History  - Established October 19, 1466  - Loss of autonomy 1 July 1569  - Annexed August 5, 1772 Royal Prussia (German: ; Polish: ) was a province of the Kingdom of Poland and then the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1772. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: , Ruthenian: Wialikaje Kniastwa Litowskaje, Ruskaje, Å»amojckaje, Belarusian: , Ukrainian: , Polish: , Latin: ) was an Eastern and Central European state of the 12th[1] /13th century until the 18th century. ...


Since ~1200, a steady influx of German settlers had been arriving in Pomerania. One of the first recorded German settler came to Stettin (Szczecin) in 1187. Some rural parts of Pomerania were however still predominantly Slavic in character before the advent of Protestantism. Later though the duchy of Pomerania became German by ethnicity, language and culture, whereas Pomerelia still preserved a Slavic character. Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


In 15th century, conflict with Brandenburg about the rule of the Uckermark and Pomerania resulted in 1425 war of Brandenburg against Pomerania, Mecklenburg, the Teutonic Order and even Poland. Brandenburg was able to keep the Uckermark, but Hohenzollern pretensions to rule Pomerania were thwarted. Uckermark is a Kreis (district) in the northeastern part of Brandenburg, Germany. ...

See also: Kashubians and Ostsiedlung, also Kashubian settlement areas from 800-today

Kashubians, Kassubians, or Cassubians (Kashubian: Kaszëbi) are a Slavic ethnic group living in modern-day northwestern Poland. ... Evolution of German linguistic area from 700 to 1950 Settlement in the East (German: ), also known as German eastward expansion, refers to the eastward migration and settlement of Germans into regions inhabited since the Great Migrations by the Balts, Romanians, Hungarians and, since about the 8th century, the Slavs. ...

The 16th–17th centuries

For more details on this topic, see Swedish Pomerania.

Disputes with Brandenburg continued. These were partially agreed at the Conference of Juterbog (1527) between Joachim I Nestor, Elector of Brandenburg, and the Duke of Pomerania. As the Protestant Reformation gathered pace, Pomerania also converted to Lutheranism, but the process was slower than in Brandenburg. Swedish Pomerania (Swedish: Svenska Pommern) was a Dominion under the Swedish Crown from the 17th to the 19th century, situated on the German Baltic Sea coast. ... Joachim I Nestor (21 February 1484 – 11 July 1535) was a Prince-elector of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1499-1535). ... “Reformation” redirects here. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ...


In 1637 the last of the Dukes of Pomerania, Boguslaw XIV, died without direct male successor. During the Thirty Years' War, King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden occupied Pomerania. In the negotiations between France, Brandenburg, and Sweden following the Northern War the Brandenburg diplomats Joachim Friedrich von Blumenthal and his son Christoph Caspar obtained the rights of succession for Brandenburg, though the argument with Sweden, especially over Hither Pomerania, continued to the end of the 17th century and beyond, until the Treaty of Stockholm in 1720. Coin with BogusÅ‚aw XIV. BogusÅ‚aw XIV of Pomerania (31 March 1580 - 10 March 1637) was the prince of Stettin and Pomerania, bishop of Kamieniec and last of the Gryfit dynasty (Greifen dynasty) on the Pomeranian throne. ... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway (Until 1643) Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire ( Catholic League) Spain Austria Bavaria Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I of... Gustav II Adolf (9 December 1594 – 6 November 1632 O.S.), widely known by the Latinized name Gustavus (II) Adolphus and sometimes as Gustav Adolf the Great (Swedish: ), was King of Sweden from 1611 until his death. ... King Charles X of Sweden The Northern Wars (1655-1661) is a name sometimes used for the series of conflicts between Sweden and its adversaries Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (The Deluge, 1655-1660), Russia (1656-1661), Brandenburg-Prussia (1657-1660), the Holy Roman Empire (1657-60) and Denmark (1657-1658, 1658... The Treaty of Stockholm can mean: Treaty of Stockholm (1371) Treaty of Stockholm (1435) Treaty of Stockholm (1465) Treaty of Stockholm (1497) Treaty of Stockholm (1502) Treaty of Stockholm (1523) Treaty of Stockholm (1672) Treaty of Stockholm (1719) - Hannover Treaty of Stockholm (1720) - Prussia Treaty of Stockholm (1720) - Denmark Treaty...


The 18th–19th centuries

Prussian noblemen began to acquire estates in Pomerania, while Pomeranian noblemen were integrated into Prussian society. Thus originally Wendish noble families such as the von Lettows, von Strelows, von Peglows, von Zitzewitzes and von Krockows intermarried with German families from Brandenburg such as the von Blumenthals, who possessed great estates at Quackenburg, Varzin, Dubberzin, Schlönwitz and elsewhere. By the nineteenth century Pomerania was mostly Germanised, and was a popular place of retirement for the well-to-do such as Bismarck, who bought Varzin. Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Warcino is a village in Poland Latitude 54. ... Bismarck redirects here. ...


The 20th century

After the first World War, Pomerelia (as West Prussia and Danzig (Gdansk)) came to Poland. After the defeat of Germany in World War II in 1945, the Potsdam Conference placed most of Pomerania under Polish administration. The German population of the transferred territories fled, was expelled, or lost their lives. Some Germans were retained by Soviet authorities to do forced labour in the Soviet exclaves for a number of years after 1945.[7] The now Polish parts of Pomerania were resettled with Poles. WWI may be an acronym for: World War I World Wrestling Industry This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The German Instrument of Surrender, 1945 refers to the legal instrument of World War II in which the High Command of Nazi Germany surrendered simultaneously to the Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force and to the Soviet High command. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Harry S. Truman and Joseph Stalin meeting at the Potsdam Conference on July 18, 1945. ... Germans expelled from the Sudetenland // The expulsion of Germans after World War II refers to the forced migration of people considered Germans (Reichsdeutsche and some Volksdeutsche) from various European states and territories during 1945 and in the first three years after World War II 1946-48. ... “CCCP” redirects here. ... Unfree labour is a generic or collective term for forms of work, especially in modern or early modern history, in which adults and/or children are employed without wages, or for a minimal wage. ...


See also

  • Kashubian-Pomeranian Association
  • Pomeranian (dog)
  • Flight and expulsion of Germans from Poland during and after World War II

The Kashubian-Pomeranian Association (Kashubian-Pomeranian: Kaszebsko-Pomorscze Zrzeszenie, Polish: Zrzeszenie Kaszubsko-Pomorskie) is the regional non-governmental organization of the Kashubians, Pomeranians and people interested in the regional affairs of Kashubia and Pomerania in northern Poland. ... For other uses, see Pomeranian. ... The expulsion of Germans from Poland after World War II was part of a series of expulsions of Germans from Central and Eastern Europe during and after World War II. This article covers the expulsion of Germans from all regions which are currently within the territorial boundaries of Poland although...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Pomerelia overlaps with and is also sometimes called West Prussia.
  2. ^ For instance whether Pomerelia is to be included.
  3. ^ http://www.genemaas.net/Pommern.htm
  4. ^ The dispute between the Teutonic Knights and the Polish kings was settled in negotiations in the Treaty of Kalisz (1343). This easternmost part of Pomerania remained under the rule of the Teutonic Knights as a fief of the Polish Crown. Polish kings held the title of Duke of Pomerania within the Holy Roman Empire's fief of entire Pomerania.
  5. ^ In 1654 Farther Pomerania was conquered by Brandenburg-Prussia from the Swedes. In 1720 Hither Pomerania became also a part of the then Kingdom of Prussia. With the Partitions of Poland 1772–1795 Pomerelia was incorporated into Prussia as the Province of West Prussia.
  6. ^ In the Prussian provinces of Pomerania and West Prussia. The Kingdom of Prussia was a member state of the German Confederation (1815–1866), the North German Confederation (1867–1871), and the German Empire (since 1871).
  7. ^ Vegelahn Familiengeschichte

One of four districts of East Prussia in 1920 - 1938. ... For the state, see Monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. ... The Treaty of Kalisz (German: ; Polish: ) was signed by King Casimir III the Great of Poland and the Teutonic Knights in 1343. ... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a vassal knights service (usually fealty, military service, and security). ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern) in yellow. ... The Brandenburg-Prussian state was formed in 1618 when the Duchy of Prussia came under the control of the Elector of Brandenburg (part of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Western Pomerania. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... The Partitions of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (Polish: Rozbiór Polski or Rozbiory Polski; Lithuanian: Lietuvos-Lenkijos padalijimai, Belarusian: Падзелы Рэчы Паспалітай) took place in the 18th century and ended the existence of the sovereign Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Pomerania and the other Provinces of Prussia in the German Empire. ... The German Confederation (German: Deutscher Bund) was the association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ... Map of the North German Confederation Capital Berlin Political structure Federation Presidency Prussia (William I) Chancellor Otto von Bismarck History  - Constitution tabelled April 16, 1867  - Confederation formed July 1, 1867  - Elevation to empire January 18, 1871 The North German Federation (in German, Norddeutscher Bund) came into existence in 1867, following... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ...

Further reading

Publications in English

  • Byrnes, James F., Speaking Frankly, New York, 1947.
  • Keesing's Research Report, Germany and Eastern Europe since 1945, New York, 1973, Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 72-7729. ISBN 0-684-13190-0
  • de Zayas, Alfred M, Nemesis at Potsdam, Routledge, (1st edition 1977), Revised edition 1979, ISBN 0-7100-0458-3
  • Boehlke, LeRoy, Pomerania - Its People and Its History, Pommerscher Verein Freistadt, Germantown, WI, U.S.A., 1983.
  • von Krockow, Christian, Hour of the Women, UK edition 1992, Faber & Faber, ISBN 0-571-14320-2
  • Herrick, Linda, & Wendy Uncapher, Pomerania - Atlantic Bridge to Germany, Origins, Janesville, WI, U.S.A., 2005.

For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Faber and Faber is a celebrated publishing house in the UK, notable in particular for publishing the poetry of T. S. Eliot. ...

Publications in Polish

  • Gerard Labuda (ed.), Historia Pomorza, vol. I (to 1466), parts 1-2, Poznań 1969
  • Gerard Labuda (ed.), Historia Pomorza, vol. II (1466–1815), parts 1-2, Poznań 1976
  • Gerard Labuda (ed.), Historia Pomorza, vol. III (1815–1850), parts 1-3, Poznań
  • Gerard Labuda (ed.), Historia Pomorza, vol. IV (1850–1918), part 1, Toruń 2003
  • Marian Biskup (ed.), Śląsk i Pomorze w historii stosunków polsko-niemieckich w średniowieczu. XII Konferencja Wspólnej Komisji Podręcznikowej PRL-RFN Historyków 5–10 VI 1979 Olsztyn, Instytut Zachdni, Poznań 1987
  • Antoni Czubiński, Zbigniew Kulak (ed.), Śląsk i Pomorze w stosunkach polsko-niemieckich od XVI do XVII w. XIV Konferencja Wspólnej Komisji Podręcznikowej PRL-RFN Historyków, 9–14 VI 1981 r. Zamość, Instytut Zachodni, Poznań 1987
  • Szkice do dziejów Pomorza, vol. 1-3, Warszawa 1958-61
  • B. Wachowiak, Rozwój gospodarczo-społeczny Pomorza Zachodniego od połowy XV do początku XVII wieku, Studia i Materiały do dziejów Wielkopolski i Pomorza, 1958, z. 1
  • J. Wiśniewski, Początki układu kapitalistycznego na Pomorzu Zachodnim w XVIII wieku, Studia i Materiały do dziejów Wielkopolski i Pomorza, 1958, z. 1
  • A. Wielopolski, Gospodarka Pomorza Zachodniego w latach 1800–1918, Szczecin 1959
  • W. Odyniec, Dzieje Prus Królewskich (1454–1772). Zarys monograficzny, Warszawa 1972
  • Dzieje Pomorza Nadwiślańskiego od VII wieku do 1945 roku, Gdańsk 1978
  • Zygmunt Boras, "Książęta Pomorza Zachodniego", Poznań 1969, 1978, 1996
  • Zygmunt Boras, "Stosunki polsko-pomorskie w XVI w", Poznań 1965
  • Zygmunt Boras, "Związki Śląska i Pomorza Zachdoniego z Polską w XVI wieku", Poznań 1981
  • Kazimierz Kozłowski, Jerzy Podralski, "Poczet Książąt Pomorza Zachodniego", KAW, Szczecin 1985
  • Lech Bądkowski, W. Samp. "Poczet książąt Pomorza Gdańskiego", Gdańsk 1974
  • B. Śliwiński, "Poczet książąt gdańskich", Gdańsk 1997
  • Wojciech Myślenicki, "Pomorscy sprzymierzenscy Jagiellończyków", Wydawnictwo Poznańskie, Poznań 1979
  • Józef Spors, "Podziały administracyjne Pomorza Gdańskiego i Sławieńsko-Słupskiego od XII do początków XIV w", Słupsk 1983
  • Kazimierz Ślaski, "Podziały terytorialne Pomorza w XII-XII w.", Poznań 1960
  • Benon Miśkiewicz, "Z dziejów wojennych Pomorza Zachodniego. Cedynia 972-Siekierki 1945", Wydawnictwo Poznańskie, Poznań 1972

Publications in German

  • M. Wehrmann, Geschichte von Pommern, vol. 1-2, Gotha 1919-21
  • M. Spahn, Verfassungs- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte des Herzogtums Pommern von 1476 bis 1625, Leipzig 1896
  • B. Schumacher, Geschichte Ost- und Westpreussens, Würzburg 1959

External links

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Internet directories

The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

Culture and history

Maps of Pomerania


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pomerania (1472 words)
Pomerania founded the first monasteries: in 1153 a Benedictine abbey at Stolp, and later a Premonstratensian abbey at Grobe on the island of Usedom.
Pomerania was assured in the fourteenth century, and the
Pomerania as far as the Peene was given to Brandenburg-Prussia; the rest of the province and the island of Rügen were obtained by Prussia in the treaty of 4 June, 1815.
Swedish Pomerania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1704 words)
Pomerania became involved in the Thirty Years' War during the 1620s, and with the town of Stralsund under siege by imperial troops its ruler Bogislaus XIV, the Duke of Stettin, concluded a treaty with the Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus in June 1628.
As a consequence Pomerania would lapse into a state of anarchy, thereby forcing the Swedes to act and from 1641 the administration was led by a council ("Concilium status") from Stettin, until the peace treaty in 1648 settled rights to the province in Swedish favour.
The nobility of Pomerania was firmly established and held extensive privileges, as opposed to the other end of the spectrum which was populated by a class of numerous serfs.
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