FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Polytheists

Polytheism is belief in, or worship of, multiple gods or divinities. The word comes from the Greek words poly+theoi, literally "many gods." Most ancient religions were polytheistic, holding to pantheons of traditional deities, often accumulated over centuries of cultural interchange and experience. The belief in many gods does not preclude the belief in an all- powerful all-knowing supreme being. Present-day polytheistic religions include Hellenismos, Shinto, some forms of Wicca, Vodun, and Ásatrú. Buddhism and Hinduism are regarded by some non-practitioners as polytheistic although this view of the religion is rejected by many believers. For example, see Ishta-Deva, a concept held in Smartism, the only denomination in Hinduism that holds this view strictly and has confused outsiders to perceive Hinduism as polytheistic.) Vaishnavism and Shaivism, the other major denominations of Hinduism, however, conform to a Western perception of what a monotheistic faith is. Some Jewish and Islamic scholars regard the Christian doctrine of the trinity as bordering on polytheism, a view that Christians in general strongly reject. This article is about deities or gods from a non-monotheistic perspective. ... Pantheon (Greek: παν, pan, all + θεόν, theon, of the gods), in one sense, is the set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Greek mythology, Norse mythology. ... Hellenismos (Hellênismos), corresponding to the English word Hellenism, meant (in ancient Greek) the imitation of the Greeks. ... A torii at Itsukushima Shrine Shintō (Japanese: 神道) is the native religion of Japan. ... For the book series Wicca see Sweep (book series) and Circle Of Three. ... The term Voodoo (Vodun in Benin; also Vodou or other phonetically equivalent spellings in Haiti; Vudu in the Dominican Republic) is applied to the branches of a West African ancestor-based religious tradition with primary roots among the Fon-Ewe peoples of West Africa, in the country now known as... Ásatrú describes a variety of revivals of the indigenous, pre-Christian religions of the Teutonic tribes of Northern Europe. ... Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... This article is about the Hindu religion OM, the most sacred syllable and quintessential symbol of Hinduism, represents the first manifestation of the unmanifest Brahman. ... Ishta-Deva, or Ishta Devata is a term from Hinduism that means chosen Deity or revered aspect of God by a devotee and is a widely held concept in Smartism. ... Smartism is a denomination of the religion of Hinduism and is closely affiliated with the Advaita tradition. ... Vaishnavism is the branch of Hinduism in which Vishnu or one of his avatars (i. ... Shaivism, also Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ... This article concerns the Holy Trinity of Christianity and related religious denominations. ...

Contents

Ancient polytheism

Well-known polytheistic pantheons in history include the Sumerian gods, the Egyptian gods, the Norse Aesir and Vanir, the Yoruba Orisha, the Aztec gods, and many others. Today, most historical polytheistic religions are referred to as "mythology", though the stories cultures tell about their gods should be distinguished from their cultus or religious practice. Chaldean mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Assyrian and Babylonian mythologies, although Chaldea did not comprehend the whole territory inhabited by those peoples. ... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people. ... The mythology of the Yorùbá is sometimes claimed by its supporters to be one of the worlds oldest widely practised religions. ... The Aztec civilization recognized many gods and supernatural creatures Gods Acolmiztli - a god of the underworld, Mictlan Acolnahuacatl (see Acolmiztli) - a god of the underworld, Mictlan Acuecucyoticihuati (see Chalchiuhtlicue) Amimitl - god of lakes and fishermen Atl - god of water Atlacamani - goddess of oceanic storms such as hurricanes Atlacoya - goddess of...


Few ancient religions, indeed, were not polytheistic. Those that weren't include early Vedic Hinduism (which has been termed at the most henotheistic with groundings of monotheistic, monotheistic and naturalist polytheistic philosophy), henotheistic Greek and the Roman Classical Pantheon of gods, the Abrahamic religions, dualistic Zoroastrianism and Mithraism, and possibly the short-lived Atenism promulgated by Akhenaton in Egypt in the 1350s BC. This article is about the Hindu religion OM, the most sacred syllable and quintessential symbol of Hinduism, represents the first manifestation of the unmanifest Brahman. ... In religion and philosophy, henotheism is a term coined by Max Müller, meaning belief in, and possible worship of, multiple gods, one of which is supreme. ... Roman mythology can be considered as two parts. ... An Abrahamic religion (also referred to as desert monotheism) is any religion derived from an ancient Semitic tradition attributed to Abraham, a great patriarch described in the Torah, the Bible, and the Quran. ... Faravahar, The depiction of the human soul before birth and after death. ... Mithraism was an ancient Hellenistic religion, based on worship of a god called Mithras who apparently derives from the Persian god Mithra and other Zoroastrian deities. ... Aten is a sun god in ancient Egyptian mythology, and represented by the suns disk. ... Bust of Pharaoh Akhenaten. ... Centuries: 15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC Decades: 1400s BC 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC 1330s BC 1320s BC 1310s BC 1300s BC Events and Trends Significant People 1350 BC - Pharaoh Amenhotep IV Akhenaton rises to the throne of Egypt. ...


In many civilizations, pantheons tended to grow over time. Deities first worshipped as the patrons of cities or places came to be collected together as empires extended over larger territories. Conquests could lead to the subordination of the elder culture's pantheon to a newer one, as in the Greek Titanomachia, and possibly also the case of the Aesir and Vanir in the Norse mythos. Cultural exchange could lead to "the same" deity being renowned in two places under different names, as with the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans, and also to the introduction of elements of a "foreign" religion into a local cult, as with Egyptian Osiris worship brought to ancient Greece. In Greek mythology, Titanomachy was the war between the Titans (fighting from Mt. ... The Aesir (Old Norse Æsir, singular Áss, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur) are the principal pantheon of gods in Norse mythology. ... Vanir is the name of what is usually considered one of the two pantheons of gods in Norse mythology. ... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people. ... This article is about the god. ...


Gods and divinity

Hard polytheists believe that the Gods are distinct and separate beings and are happy to believe in the existence of the Gods of other peoples.


Soft polytheists come to regard their multiplicity of gods as simply representing different aspects or facets of a greater divine unity: not a personal God as in the monotheistic religions, but an ultimate reality of the divine. This concept, however, really should not be termed soft polytheism as monists believe in only one God, which can be expressed in a variety of forms or aspects. Indeed, this monism extends even beyond monotheism in rendering the ultimate one formless and without attributes, the best known example being Brahman in Advaita Vedanta, Smartism and Yoga streams of Hinduism. Modern Neopagan polytheists also often follow this model. However, other divisions of Hinduism such as Vaishnavism and Shaivism are monotheistic faiths that more closely adhere to the Western view of what a monotheistic faith is as those followers only believe in one aspect of God, similarly as Jews and Muslims only believe in Yahweh and Allah. Monism is the metaphysical position that all is of one essential essence, substance or energy. ... In the Vedantic (and subsequently Yogic) schools of Hinduism, Brahman is the signifying name given to the concept of the unchanging, infinite, immanent and transcendent reality that is the Divine Ground of all being. ... Advaita Vedanta is probably the best known of all Vedanta schools of Hinduism, the others being Dvaita and Vishishtadvaita. ... Smartism is a denomination of the religion of Hinduism and is closely affiliated with the Advaita tradition. ... Hatha Yoga posture Yoga is a form of mysticism that developed on the Indian subcontinent in the Hindu cultural context. ... Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism, meaning New Paganism) is a heterogeneous group of religions which attempt to revive ancient, mainly European pre-Christian religions. ... Vaishnavism is the branch of Hinduism in which Vishnu or one of his avatars (i. ... Shaivism, also Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ...


Although many forms of Buddhism include veneration of bodhisattvas, these are not regarded as divine entities. Rather bodhisattvas are considered to be human beings who have reached a high stage of enlightenment, and one of the tenets of Buddhism is that over the course of many lifetimes any human being can also reach a similar state of enlightenment. Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... Prince Siddhartha Gautama as a bodhisattva, before becoming a Buddha. ...


That a person believes in multiple gods does not imply that he or she necessarily worships them all. Many polytheists believe in the existence of many gods, but worship only one. Max Mueller, however, spoke of a tendency to worship one being or principle, recognized as such, manifesting as many, and this particular theism was termed henotheism. Some people view henotheism as a form of monotheism, others as monism; some historians have argued that the monotheistic religions originated in henotheism. Practically all Jews, Christians and Muslims today, however, view henotheism as polytheism. Max Müller Friedrich Max Müller (December 6, 1823 – October 28, 1900), more commonly known as Max Müller, was a German Orientalist, one of the founders of Indian studies, who virtually created the discipline of comparative religion. ... In religion and philosophy, henotheism is a term coined by Max Müller, meaning belief in, and possible worship of, multiple gods, one of which is supreme. ...


See also

Agnosticism is the philosophical and theological view that spiritual truth, such as the existence of God, gods or deities, is either unknown or inherently unknowable. ... Atheism is the state either of being without theistic beliefs, or of actively disbelieving in the existence of deities. ... Deism is belief in a God or first cause based on reason and experience rather than on faith or revelation, and thus a form of theism in opposition to fideism. ... In religion and philosophy, henotheism is a term coined by Max Müller, meaning belief in, and possible worship of, multiple gods, one of which is supreme. ... Kathenotheism is a term coined by the philologist Max Müller to mean the worship of one god at a time. ... Monotheism (in Greek monon = single and Theos = God) is the belief in a single, universal, all-encompassing deity. ... Pantheism (Greek: pan = all and Theos = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ... Integrational Polytheism Integrational Polytheism is a form of polytheism where you believe in the existence of not several, but of all the gods ever described. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hellenion (630 words)
We are a diverse group of Hellenic polytheists, sharing the common goal of living a life, both common and individual, of piety and proper respect for the gods of Olympos and ancient Hellenic tradition.
We work to support present and future Hellenic polytheists by sharing research, providing for religious needs of family and community alike, and establish a stable presence on which to found a lasting future for the practice of our faith.
Hellenion is a Hellenic polytheist organization that began online with the intent of drawing together the classical Pagan community to promote fellowship, free exchange of ideas, scholarship, and spirituality.
HizmetBooks (3718 words)
Polytheists of the time of Rasulullah also used to pray and beg Allah when they were in trouble.
It is true that, since idolaters are polytheists, their protext does not rescue them from the punishment of polytheism, but is not polytheism to put His beloved human creatures as intermediaries.
Whereas, the polytheists, mentioned in the ayats believed that the idols were worth worshiping, and they were polytheists because of this misbelief.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m