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Encyclopedia > Polo Grounds
Polo Grounds

Location West 155th Street and Eighth Avenue
New York, New York (now demolished)
Broke ground 1890
Opened April 22, 1891
Renovated June 28, 1911
Expanded 1923
Closed September 18, 1963
Demolished April 10, 1964
Owner New York Giants
Surface Grass
Architect Henry B. Herts
Former names Brush Stadium (1911-1919)
Tenants
New York Giants (NL) (18911957)
New York Yankees (AL) (19131922)
New York Mets (NL) (19621963)
New York Giants (NFL) (19251955)
New York Titans/Jets (AFL) (19601963)
New York Bulldogs (NFL) (1949)
New York Giants (NFL) (1921)
Gotham Bowl (NCAA) (1961)
Capacity
34,000 (1911); 55,000 (1923)
Dimensions
Left Field – 279 ft (85 m)
Left-Center – 450 ft (137.1 m)
Center Field – 483 ft (147.2 m)
Right-Center – 449 ft (136.8 m)
Right Field – 258 ft (78.6 m)

The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseball's New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their first two seasons of 1962 and 1963. It also hosted the 1934 and 1942 Major League Baseball All-Star Games. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1891 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1957 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1913 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... The following are the events of the year 1962 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the events of the year 1963 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... NFL redirects here. ... See also: 1924 in sports, other events of 1925, 1926 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball (Major League) Pittsburgh Pirates def. ... See also: 1954 in sports, other events of 1955, 1956 in sports and the list of years in sports. // [edit] Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Tim Flock AAA Racing: Bob Sweikert won the Indianapolis 500 Bob Sweikert won the season championship Formula One Championship - Juan Manuel Fangio of Argentina 24 hours... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... // December 4 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Barry Magee (NZL) 2:19:04 Stock car racing: Junior Johnson won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Rex White Indianapolis 500 - Jim Rathmann USAC Racing - A.J. Foyt won the season championship Formula One Championship - Jack Brabham of Australia 24 hours of... // May 4 — Pan American Games Marathon, Sao Paulo, Brazil Mens Winner: Fidel Negrete (MEX) 2:27:56 July 13 — Enschede Marathon, Netherlands Mens Winner: Václav Chudomel (CZE) 2:25:11 October 15 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Jeff Julian (NZL) 2:18:01 Stock car racing... The New York Yanks started life as the Boston Yanks in the National Football League in 1944. ... NFL redirects here. ... See also: 1948 in sports, other events of 1949, 1950 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto racing The first 24 hours of Le Mans is held since the beginning of World War II. Luigi Chinetti and Lord Seldson win the race in a Ferrari 166M. Baseball... Brickleys Giants (formally named the New York Giants) were a professional football team with the APFA (now NFL) whose only season played was in 1921. ... NFL redirects here. ... See also: 1920 in sports, other events of 1921, 1922 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (American) Chicago Staleys later the Chicago Bears win the 1921 American Professional Football Association title. ... The Gotham Bowl was a post-season college football bowl game that was played in New York City in 1961 and 1962. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the sport. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... See also: 1882 in sports, other events of 1883, 1884 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball September 6 - The Chicago White Stockings set a still standing record for Major League Baseball by scoring 18 runs in a single inning (the 7th) in a game against the... See also: 1956 in sports, other events of 1957, 1958 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Buck Baker Indianapolis 500 - Sam Hanks USAC Racing - Jimmy Bryan won the season championship Formula One Championship - Juan Manuel Fangio of Argentina 24 hours of Le Mans... The Metropolitan Club (the New York Metropolitans or the Mets) was a 19th century professional baseball team that played from 1880 to 1887. ... See also: 1882 in sports, other events of 1883, 1884 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball September 6 - The Chicago White Stockings set a still standing record for Major League Baseball by scoring 18 runs in a single inning (the 7th) in a game against the... See also: 1884 in sports, other events of 1885, 1886 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball World Series - Chicago NL ties St Louis AA, 3 games to 3 with one tie. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... See also: 1911 in sports, 1913 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball April 20: The Boston Red Sox open in the new Fenway Park with a 7-6, 11-inning win over the New York Highlanders before 27,000. ... See also: 1921 in sports, other events of 1922, 1923 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 26th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 11. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... // World Artistic Gymnastics Championships Mens all-around champion: Yuri Titov, USSR Womens all-around champion: Larissa Latynina, USSR Team competition champions: mens - Japan; womens - USSR Seventh European Championships, held from September 12 to September 16 in Belgrade, Yugoslavia August 29 — Asian Games Marathon, Jakarta, Indonesia Men... // May 4 — Pan American Games Marathon, Sao Paulo, Brazil Mens Winner: Fidel Negrete (MEX) 2:27:56 July 13 — Enschede Marathon, Netherlands Mens Winner: Václav Chudomel (CZE) 2:25:11 October 15 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Jeff Julian (NZL) 2:18:01 Stock car racing... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World...


The original Polo Grounds was built in the 1870s for the sport of polo, thus accounting for its name. It was the only one of the four structures that was actually used for polo. The field was originally referred to in newspapers simply as "the polo grounds", and over time this generic designation became a proper name. It was converted to a baseball stadium when leased by the New York Metropolitans in 1880. The stadium was used jointly by the Giants and Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, and the name stuck for each subsequent stadium of the Giants. // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... The Metropolitan Club (the New York Metropolitans or the Mets) was a 19th century professional baseball team that played from 1880 to 1887. ... See also: 1879 in sports, other events of 1880, 1881 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Boat race Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race - Oxford Cricket 6 September-8 September, London - Only Test, England v Australia. ... See also: 1882 in sports, other events of 1883, 1884 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball September 6 - The Chicago White Stockings set a still standing record for Major League Baseball by scoring 18 runs in a single inning (the 7th) in a game against the... See also: 1884 in sports, other events of 1885, 1886 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball World Series - Chicago NL ties St Louis AA, 3 games to 3 with one tie. ...


The fourth and final Polo Grounds, which the Giants used until they moved to San Francisco after the 1957 season, and which the Mets used until Shea Stadium was completed in 1964, was the most famous, and is the one most people mean when they refer to the Polo Grounds. The name "Polo Grounds" did not actually appear prominently on any of the stadiums, until the Mets posted it with a large sign in 1962. “San Francisco” redirects here. ... See also: 1956 in sports, other events of 1957, 1958 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Buck Baker Indianapolis 500 - Sam Hanks USAC Racing - Jimmy Bryan won the season championship Formula One Championship - Juan Manuel Fangio of Argentina 24 hours of Le Mans... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... See also: 1963 in sports, other events of 1964, 1965 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Athletics March 6 – Tom OHara sets a new world record for the indoor mile run by completing it in 3 hours, 56. ...


The park was noted for its distinctive bathtub shape, with very short distances to the left and right field walls, but an unusually deep center field.


Left field also had an upper deck ("the short porch") which extended out over the field (after its 1923 extension), reducing the distance from 279 feet (85 meters) to about 250 feet (76 meters). That meant it was technically rather difficult to hit a home run into the lower deck of the left field stands, unless it was a line drive such as Bobby Thomson's famous home run in 1951. Robert Brown Bobby Thomson (born October 25, 1923 in Glasgow, Scotland), nicknamed The Staten Island Scot, is a Scottish-American former Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the New York Giants (1946-53, 1957), Milwaukee Braves (1954-57), Chicago Cubs (1958-59), Boston Red Sox... The Shot Heard Round the World In baseball, the Shot Heard Round the World is the term given to the walk-off home run hit by New York Giants outfielder Bobby Thomson off Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Ralph Branca at the Polo Grounds to win the National League pennant at 3... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


No player ever hit a fly ball that reached the 483-foot (147-meter) distant center-field wall, which fronted a part of the clubhouse which overhung the field. Given that overhang, it was not inherently clear what the actual "home run line" would have been in straightaway center. Some sources listed the center field distance as 505, which suggests that was where the true home run line would have been, at the back of the clubhouse overhang. But if there were any ground rules governing such a situation, they never had to be applied.

Contents

Chronology

The first Polo Grounds

Image File history File links Polo_Grounds_original. ... Image File history File links Polo_Grounds_original. ...

Polo Grounds I

The original Polo Grounds was located at 110th Street and Sixth Avenue (now Lenox Avenue), just outside the north edge of Central Park. It had two grandstands, and the field was divided into east and west for use by Metropolitans (of the American Association), the original tenants, and the New York Gothams (who later became the Giants) of the National League. The two teams had the same ownership. Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... The Metropolitan Club (the New York Metropolitans or the Mets) was a 19th century professional baseball team that played from 1880 to 1887. ... The American Association (AA) was a baseball major league from 1882 to 1891. ... San Francisco Giants AAA Fresno Grizzlies AA Norwich Navigators A San Jose Giants Augusta GreenJackets Salem-Keizer Volcanoes R Arizona Giants Edit this box The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball team based in San Francisco, California. ... The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ...

Manhattan Field ca. 1901 with Polo Grounds outfield in background

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 324 pixelsFull resolution (1480 × 600 pixel, file size: 86 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)This is a photo of Manhattan Field taken around 1901. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 324 pixelsFull resolution (1480 × 600 pixel, file size: 86 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)This is a photo of Manhattan Field taken around 1901. ...

Polo Grounds II

All the later Polo Grounds were located at 155th Street and Eighth Avenue (now Frederick Douglass Boulevard) at the northwest corner. The site, on which a public housing project now stands, is overlooked to the north and west by a steep promontory known as Coogan's Bluff. The ballpark itself was thus in the bottomland, or Coogan's Hollow. The land remained in the Coogan estate, and the Giants were renters for their entire duration at the ballpark. Coogans Bluff is the name of a promontory located in upper Manhattan in New York City. ...


The grandstand of the second Polo Grounds had a conventional curve around the infield, but the shape of the property left the center field area actually closer than left center or right center. This was not much of an issue in the "dead ball era" of baseball. After one season alone at that site, the new Players' League team built their "Brotherhood Park" directly to the north, bordering the second Polo Grounds and otherwise bounded by rail yards and the bluff. As with the first Polo Grounds, if the teams played on the same day, fans in the upper decks could watch each others' games, and home run balls hit in one park might land on the other team's playing field. This amusing situation lasted for just one season, the Players' League being a one-year wonder, and the Giants moved into the more spacious neighboring field, taking the "Polo Grounds" name with them. The original ballpark was then referred to as "Manhattan Field", and was converted for other sports such as football and track-and-field. It still existed as a structure for nearly 20 more years. Babe Ruth's first home run as a Yankee, on May 1, 1920, was characterized by the New York Times reporter as a "sockdolager" (i.e. a decisive blow), and was described as traveling "over the right field grand stand into Manhattan Field".[1] Bill Jenkinson's modern research indicates the ball traveled about 500 feet in total, after clearing the Polo Grounds double decked right field stand. Manhattan Field was a playground or vacant lot by then. Some years later, the vacant lot was paved over, to serve as a parking lot for the Polo Grounds. Ebbets Field in 1913 The dead-ball era is a baseball term used to describe the period between 1900 (though some date it to the beginning of baseball) and the emergence of Babe Ruth as a power hitter in 1920. ... The Players League, also known as The Brotherhood, was an attempt to establish a third major baseball league in 1890. ... This article is about the pitcher and outfielder. ...

Polo Grounds (3) (left) and Manhattan Field (aka Polo Grounds 2) (right) ca. 1900

Image File history File links Polo_Grounds_Manhattan_Field. ... Image File history File links Polo_Grounds_Manhattan_Field. ...

Polo Grounds III & IV

The "third" and "fourth" Polo Grounds were actually the same ballfield. The 1890 structure initially had a totally open outfield bounded by just the outer fence, but bleachers were gradually added. By the early 1900s, some bleacher sections encroached on the field from the foul lines about halfway along left and right field. Additionally, there was a pair of "cigar box" bleachers on either side of the "batter's eye" in centerfield. The expansive outfield was cut down somewhat by a rope fence behind which carriages (and early automobiles) were allowed to park. By 1910, bleachers enclosed the outfield, and the carriage ropes were gone. The hodge-podge approach to the bleacher construction formed a multi-faceted outfield area. There were a couple of gaps between some of the sections, and that would prove significant in 1911. The Batters Eye is a solid-colored, usually dark area beyond the centerfield wall that is the visual backdrop directly in the line of sight of a baseball batter, while facing the pitcher and awaiting a pitch. ...


On Friday, April 14, 1911, a fire of unknown origin swept through the horseshoe of the grandstand portion, consuming the wood and leaving only the steel uprights in place. The gaps between some sections of the stands saved a good portion of the outfield seating, as well as the clubhouse, from destruction. The Giants temporarily rented Hilltop Park from the Yankees while they began to rebuild the Polo Grounds double-decked grandstand in concrete and steel. Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ...


The stadium's reconstruction was sufficiently far along to allow the Polo Grounds to re-open on June 28, 1911, the date from which later baseball guides dated the structure, now sometimes retronamed as "Polo Grounds IV". The new seating areas were rebuilt during the season while the games went on. The new structure stretched in roughly the same semi-circle as before from the left field corner around home plate to the right field corner, and was also extended into deep right-center field. The surviving bleachers were retained pretty much as they were, with gaps remaining between the bleachers and the new fireproof construction.


The Giants rose from the ashes along with their ballpark, winning the National League pennant in 1911 (as they also would in 1912 and 1913). As evidenced from the World Series programs, the team tried to rename the new structure Brush Stadium in honor of their then-owner John T. Brush, but the name did not stick, and it died with him. The remaining old bleachers were demolished during the 1923 season when the permanent double-deck was extended around most of the rest of the field and new bleachers and clubhouse were constructed across center field. For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... John T. Brush was the owner of the New York Giants in the first decades of the 20th Century. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Polo Grounds ca.1922
Polo Grounds ca.1923

This version of the ballpark had its share of quirks. The "unofficial" distances (never marked on the wall) down the left and right field lines were 279 and 258 feet respectively, but there was a 21 foot overhang in left field, which often intercepted fly balls which would otherwise have been catchable and turned them into home runs. Contrasting with the short distances down the lines were the 450-some foot distances in the gaps, with straightaway center field 483 feet distant from home plate; the catch that Willie Mays made in the 1954 World Series against the Cleveland Indians would likely have been a home run in almost any other ballpark of the time. The bullpens were actually in play, in the left and right center field gaps. The outfield sloped downward from the infield, and people in the dugouts often could only see the top half of the outfielders. Image File history File links Scaled-down photo of the Polo Grounds the way it looked after 1911 resurrection and before 1923 remodeling. ... Image File history File links Scaled-down photo of the Polo Grounds the way it looked after 1911 resurrection and before 1923 remodeling. ... Image File history File links Scaled-down photo of the Polo Grounds the way it looked after 1923 remodeling and before lights were installed. ... Image File history File links Scaled-down photo of the Polo Grounds the way it looked after 1923 remodeling and before lights were installed. ... The Catch: Willie Mays hauls in Vic Wertzs drive at the warning track in the 1954 World Series The Catch refers to a memorable defensive baseball play by Willie Mays on September 29, 1954, during Game 1 of the 1954 World Series between the New York Giants and the... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Steamers (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Steamers, The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field... While the game goes on, a relief pitcher warms up in the bullpen, beyond the outfield fence In baseball, the bullpen is the area where pitchers warm-up before entering a game. ...

Polo Grounds ca. 1905

The New York Yankees sublet the Polo Grounds from the Giants during 1913-1922 after their lease on Hilltop Park expired. After the 1922 season, the Yankees built Yankee Stadium directly across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds, a situation which spurred the Giants to expand their park to reach a seating capacity comparable to the Stadium, to stay competitive. However, since nearly all the new seating was in the outfield, the Stadium still had a lot more "good" seats than did the Polo Grounds, at least for baseball. At that point, the Polo Grounds most notably became better suited for football than it had been previously. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 209 pixelsFull resolution (1611 × 420 pixel, file size: 218 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Item Title:Deciding game bet. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 209 pixelsFull resolution (1611 × 420 pixel, file size: 218 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Item Title:Deciding game bet. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... See also: 1912 in sports, other events of 1913, 1914 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball The Brooklyn Dodgers the John McGraws New York Giants to win the World Series Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 17th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 7. ... See also: 1921 in sports, other events of 1922, 1923 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 26th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 11. ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ... Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ...


The Giants' first night game at the stadium was played on May 24, 1940. MLB game that starts at 5pm or later local time is considered a night game even if especially in the summer are played before the local sunset. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


American football

While somewhat awkwardly laid out for baseball, the various incarnations of the Polo Grounds were well-suited for football, and hundreds of football games were played there over the years.


Yale played football in the original 110th Street Polo Grounds in the 19th century, for some games which were expected to draw large crowds, including a couple of Thanksgiving contests in the 1880s (see List of Harvard-Yale football games). “Yale” redirects here. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Turkey Day Game is a colloquial American term for an annual football game played on Thanksgiving Day. ... The football teams of Harvard and Yale have been meeting nearly annually since their first game on November 13, 1875. ...


In the 20th century, both the New York Giants of the National Football League and the New York Titans/Jets of the American Football League used the Polo Grounds as their home field before moving on to other sites. This article is about the current National Football League team. ... NFL redirects here. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ...


The grounds were also used for many games by New York-area college football teams such as Fordham and Army. An upset victory by the visiting University of Notre Dame over Army in 1924 led to Grantland Rice's famous article about the Irish backfield, which he called "The Four Horsemen". The field was also the site of several Army-Navy Games in the 1910s and 1920s. A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[2] in the United States, with three residential campuses located in and around New York City. ... “USMA” redirects here. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... Grantland Rice (November 1, 1880–July 13, 1954) was an early 20th century American sportswriter. ... The Four Horsemen of Notre Dame comprised a winning group of football players at the University of Notre Dame under coach Knute Rockne. ... M*A*S*H, see The Army-Navy Game (M*A*S*H episode). ...


The football Giants hosted the 1934, 1938, 1944, and 1946 NFL championship games at the Polo Grounds. In addition the Boston Redskins moved the 1936 game from Boston to the Polo Grounds, as part of their transition in relocating to Washington. The 1934 NFL Championship Game, also known as The Sneakers Game, was played at the Polo Grounds in New York City on December 9, 1934. ... The 1938 NFL Championship Game was the 6th championship game played in the history of the National Football League. ... The 1944 National Football League Championship Game was 12th NFL title game. ... The 1946 National Football League Championship Game, was played at the Polo Grounds in New York City on December 15, 1946. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... The 1936 NFL Championship Game was the 4th championship game played in the history of the National Football League. ...


The Polo Grounds was the site of many famous boxing matches as well, most notably the legendary 1923 heavyweight championship bout between Jack Dempsey and Luis Firpo. For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a chronological list of world heavyweight boxing champions, as recognized by the following organizations: The World Boxing Association (WBA), founded in 1921 as the National Boxing Association (NBA), The World Boxing Council (WBC), founded in 1963, The International Boxing Federation (IBF), founded in 1983, and The World Boxing... William Harrison Jack Dempsey (June 24, 1895 – May 31, 1983) was an American boxer who held the world heavyweight title between 1919 and 1926. ... Luis Firpo and his handlers Luis Ángel Firpo, (October 11, 1894? - August 7, 1960), was an Argentine boxer of enormous transcendence. ...


Soccer

The Polo Grounds has held its fair share of international soccer matches as well over the years. In 1926, Hakoah, an all-Jewish side from Vienna, Austria, "drew the largest crowds ever to watch soccer in America up to that time: three successive games drew 25,000, 30,000, and 36,000 spectators. The highlight of the tour was a May 1, 1926 exhibition game between Hakoah and an American Soccer League all-New York team which drew 46,000 fans to the Polo Grounds in New York." The ASL team won 3 - 0. Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hakoah Vienna football team, 1925 Sport Club Hakoah Wien or Hakoah Vienna is a Viennese athletic club which was the largest of its time in the early 20th century. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... The American Soccer League, operating between 1921 and 1933, was the first significant viable professional soccer league in the United States. ...


Here is pictoral proof that soccer was played at the Polo Grounds


On May 19, 1935, The Scotland national football team toured the United States, and in their first game played against an ASL All-Star squad which was unofficially representing the United States. Scotland won 5 - 1 in front of 25, 000 people at the Polo Grounds. In 1939, the Scots returned to America for another tour, and played at the Polo Grounds twice. In their first game at the Polo Grounds on May 21, 1939, Scotland tied the Eastern USA All-Stars 1 - 1 in front of 25,072 fans. In their second game at the Polo Grounds on June 18, 1939, Scotland beat the American League Stars 4 - 2. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... First international Scotland 0–0 England  (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11–0 Ireland  (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat  Uruguay 7–0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... This article is about the country. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Following World War II, on September 26, 1948, The US national team beat the Israel national football team 3 - 1 in Israel's first ever friendly since independence before 25,000 fans at the Polo Grounds. On June 9, 1950, a crowd of 21, 000 fans came to the Polo Grounds to watch a 'International Dream Double Header'. Beşiktaş J.K. of Turkey defeated the American Soccer League All-Stars 3-1, and then Manchester United defeated Jönköping (the top amateur team in Sweden) 4-0. On May 17, 1960, Birmingham City of England played Third Lanark of Scotland and lost 4 - 1 at the Polo Grounds in New York City. On August 6 of the same year, 25, 440 patrons showed up at the Polo Grounds to watch the inaugural International Soccer League Final which saw Bangu of Brazil edge out Kilmarnock FC of Scotland 2 - 0. The following year 1961 may have been the last year documented that soccer was played at the Polo Grounds. The second edition of the International Soccer League held most of its game at the Polo Grounds, with a few games held in Montreal. On July 16, 1961 Shamrock Rovers beat Red Star Belgrade 5-1, on August 9, Dukla Prague beat Everton fc 7 - 0, and 4 days later on August 13, Dukla Prague beat Everton again 2 - 0, thus winning the Dwight D. Eisenhower Trophy. The combined attendance for both games at the Polo Grounds was 31, 627. In domestic league soccer, the Polo Grounds was the home to the New York Nationals of the American Soccer League in 1928. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... First international Unofficial: USA 0 - 1 Canada  (Newark, NJ, USA; November 28, 1885) Official:  Sweden 2 - 3 USA (Stockholm, Sweden; August 20, 1916) Biggest win USA 8 - 1 Cayman Islands  (Mission Viejo, CA, USA; November 14, 1993) USA 7 - 0 El Salvador  (Los Angeles, CA, USA; December 5, 1993) USA... First international  Egypt 7 - 1 Palestine/Eretz Israel (Cairo, Egypt; March 16, 1934)  USA 3 - 1 Israel (New York City, USA; September 26, 1948) Biggest win Israel 9 - 0 Chinese Taipei  (Wellington, New Zealand; March 23, 1988) Biggest defeat Egypt 7 - 1 Palestine/Eretz Israel (Cairo, Egypt; March 16, 1934... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BeÅŸiktaÅŸ J.K. (Full Turkish name: BeÅŸiktaÅŸ Jimnastik Kulübü, BeÅŸiktaÅŸ Gymnastics Club) is a Turkish sports club from Ä°stanbul, which professionally participates in many branches including football, basketball, volleyball, handball and chess. ... Manchester Uniteds emblem Manchester United F.C. (often abbreviated to Man United or just Man U, pronounced man-yoo) is an English football club based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... Location in Sweden Jönköping is a city in SmÃ¥land in southern Sweden with 84,423 inhabitants (2005). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Birmingham City Football Club are an English football club based in Birmingham, in the heart of the West Midlands. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Third Lanark Athletic Club was a Scottish football team that existed from 1872 to 1967 and were based in Glasgow. ... This article is about the country. ... Kilmarnock Football Club, founded in 1869 and nicknamed Killie is the oldest professional football club in Scotland. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Shamrock Rovers FC is a Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... The name Crvena zvezda can also be applied to KK Crvena zvezda, VK Crvena zvezda, RK Crvena zvezda. ... Dukla Prague (Czech: Dukla Praha) was a successful football team in the former Czechoslovakia. ... Everton F.C. is an English football club from the city of Liverpool and was founded in 1878. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The New York Nationals are a basketball team that has been the regular opponent of the Harlem Globetrotters since 1995. ... The American Soccer League, operating between 1921 and 1933, was the first significant viable professional soccer league in the United States. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Gaelic football

On September 14, 1947, the Polo Grounds hosted the final of the All-Ireland Senior Gaelic Football championship between Cavan and Kerry. This novel location for the game was chosen for the benefit of New York's large Irish immigrant population. It was the first, and only, time that the final has been played outside of Ireland. is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... Gaelic football (Irish: Peil or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, Gaelic or GAA (gah), is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... // History Gaelic football Hurling External links Cavan on Hoganstand. ... The Kerry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (or Kerry GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kerry. ... // The Irish diaspora consists of Irish emigrants and their descendants in countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Argentina, Mexico, New Zealand, South Africa and states of the Caribbean and continental Europe. ...


Center field

Willie Mays, The Catch and the 483 sign in 1954.

In Game 1 of the 1954 World Series, Giants outfielder Willie Mays made a sensational catch of a fly ball hit by the Cleveland Indians' Vic Wertz into deep center field, a catch which in the words of radio announcer Jack Brickhouse, "Must have looked like an optical illusion to a lot of people", and which turned the tide of that Series in the Giants' favor. Image File history File links Mays_19540929. ... Image File history File links Mays_19540929. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... The Catch: Willie Mays hauls in Vic Wertzs drive at the warning track in the 1954 World Series The Catch refers to a memorable defensive baseball play by Willie Mays on September 29, 1954, during Game 1 of the 1954 World Series between the New York Giants and the... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Steamers (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Steamers, The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field... Victor Woodrow Wertz (born February 9, 1925 York, PA - died July 7, 1983 Detroit, MI) was a utility player who had a seventeen year career from 1947 to 1963. ... Jack Brickhouse (January 24, 1916 - August 6, 1998) was an American sports broadcast announcer. ...


Babe Ruth hit many of his early signature blasts at the Polo Grounds, reaching the center field seats on several occasions. His longest blast at the grounds, over the right-center upper deck in 1921, was estimated at over 550 feet. Had Ruth played regularly in the remodeled Polo Grounds, he would have been capable of hitting the clubhouse if conditions were right. Neither he nor anyone else ever did, but a few came close.


After the 1923 remodeling, only four players ever hit a home run into the center field stands:

Brock is the surprising name on that list, as he was noted mostly for hits and stolen bases (especially after being traded to the Cardinals in 1964), but he displayed power-hitting capability from time to time. Luscious Luke Easter (Born August 4, 1915 in Jonestown, MS - Died March 29, 1979 in Euclid, OH) was a professional baseball player in Major League Baseball and the Negro leagues. ... Part of the History of baseball series. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Wilbur Adcock (October 30, 1927 - May 3, 1999) was a Major League Baseball first baseman/outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the Cincinnati Reds (1950-52), Boston & Milwaukee Braves (1953-62), Cleveland Indians (1963), and Los Angeles & California Angels (1964-66). ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Louis Clark Lou Brock (born June 18, 1939, El Dorado, Arkansas) is an American former player in Major League Baseball. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The final years

Although the Polo Grounds had once been as celebrated as Yankee Stadium now is, the end of the Polo Grounds' existence was anticlimactic. Part of the problem was that the stadium was not well maintained from the late 1940s onward; while the Giants owned the stadium, they didn't own the parcel where it stood. Also, the neighborhood around it had already gone to seed. All of this combined to severely hold down ticket sales, even when the Giants played well. In 1954, for instance, the baseball Giants only drew 1.1 million fans (compared to over 2 million for the Milwaukee Braves) even as they won the World Series. This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston...


The football Giants left for Yankee Stadium following the 1955 NFL season, and the baseball Giants' disastrous 1956 season (which they spent most of in last place before a late-season surge moved them up to 6th) caused a further drag on ticket sales. The Giants' 1956 attendance was less than half of the figure for the Giants' World Series-winning 1954 season. That meant little to no money for stadium upkeep.


Frustrated with the subsequent obsolescence and dilapidated condition of the Polo Grounds and the inability to secure a more modern stadium in the New York area, the Giants announced on August 19, 1957 that they would move following that season, after nearly three-quarters of a century, to the West Coast. The ballpark then sat largely vacant for the next three years, until the newly-formed Titans and then the newly-formed Mets moved in, using the Polo Grounds as an interim home while Shea Stadium was being built. (As a 1962 baseball magazine noted, "The Mets will have to play in the Polo Grounds, hardly the last word in 20th Century stadia.") The West Coast States. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ...


In the 1992 book The Gospel According to Casey, by Ira Berkow and Jim Kaplan, it is reported that in 1963, the Mets manager Casey Stengel, who had bittersweet memories of his playing days at the grounds, had this to say during a rough outing to pitcher Tracy Stallard, whose greatest claim to fame had been giving up Roger Maris' 61st homer in 1961: "At the end of this season, they're gonna tear this joint down. The way you're pitching, the right field section will be gone already!" Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... Tracy Stallard (born August 31, 1937) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1960-1966. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths 34-year-old single-season home run record in 1961 on the last day of the season. ... See also: 1960 in sports, other events of 1961, 1962 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Marvin Panch won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Ned Jarrett Indianapolis 500 - A.J. Foyt USAC Racing - A.J. Foyt won the driving championship Formula One...


The final incarnation of the stadium was indeed demolished in 1964, and a public housing project was erected on the site. Demolition of the Polo Grounds began in April of that year with the same wrecking ball that had been used four years earlier on Ebbets Field. The wrecking crew wore Giants jerseys and tipped their hard hats to the historic stadium as they began the dismantling. It took a crew of 60 workers more than four months to level the structure. Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. ...


Timeline and teams

  • Polo Grounds I
  • Polo Grounds II (otherwise known as Manhattan Field)
    • Giants (NL), 1889-1890
  • Polo Grounds III (originally called Brotherhood Park)
  • Polo Grounds IV (also known as Brush Stadium from 1911 to 1919)
    • Giants (NL), 1911-1957
    • Yankees (American League), 1913-1922
    • Giants (NFL), 1925-1955
    • Bulldogs (NFL) 1949
    • Titans/Jets (AFL), 1960-1963
    • Mets (NL), 1962-1963

The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... The American Association (AA) was a baseball major league from 1882 to 1891. ... The Players League, also known as The Brotherhood, was an attempt to establish a third major baseball league in 1890. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... NFL redirects here. ... The New York Yanks started life as the Boston Yanks in the National Football League in 1944. ... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ...

Dimensions

Diagram of the Polo Grounds drawn in 1951

Compiled from various photos, baseball annuals, The Official Encyclopedia of Baseball (Turkin & Thompson, 1951) and Green Cathedrals by Phil Lowry. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


1890

  • Left Field Line - 335 ft. (not posted)
  • Center Field - 500 ft. (not posted)
  • Right Field Line - 335 ft. (not posted)

1911-1922

  • Left Field Line - 277 ft. (not posted)
  • Center Field - 433 ft. (not posted)
  • Right Field Line - 258 ft. (not posted)

1923-1957

  • Left Field Line - 279 ft. (not posted - sometimes listed as 280)
  • Left Field Upper Deck Overhang - about 250 ft.
  • Shallow Left Center - 315 ft.
  • Left Center 1 - 360 ft.
  • Left Center 2 - 414 ft.
  • Deep Left Center - 447 ft. left of bullpen curve
  • Deep Left Center - 455 ft. right of bullpen curve
  • Center Field - approx. 425 ft. (unposted) corners of runways
  • Center Field - 483 ft. posted on front of clubhouse balcony, sometimes 475 ft.
  • Center Field - 505 ft. (unposted) sometimes given as total C.F. distance
  • Deep Right Center - 455 ft. left of bullpen curve
  • Deep Right Center - 449 ft. right of bullpen curve
  • Right Center 2 - 395 ft.
  • Right Center 1 - 338 ft.
  • Shallow Right Center - 294 ft.
  • Right Field Line - 257 ft. 3 3/8 in. (not posted - sometimes listed as 258)
  • Backstop - 65 ft. sometimes also given as 74 ft.

Seating capacity

1911-1922

  • 34,000

1923-1957

  • 56,000

See also

The IRT Ninth Avenue Line, often called the Ninth Avenue Elevated, was the first elevated railway in New York City, first opened in 1868 as the West Side and Yonkers Patent Railway, a cable-hauled line. ... Subway redirects here; for the restaurant named Subway, see Subway (restaurant). ...

Sources

  • Green Cathedrals, by Philip J. Lowry
  • Ballparks of North America, by Michael Benson
  • Land of the Giants: New York's Polo Grounds, by Stew Thornley
  • Summer in the City, text by Vic Ziegel, N.Y. Daily News photos edited by Claus Guglberger (pp.8,71,126,184 provide good documentation of the distance-markers on the walls)

Stew Thornley (born July 23, 1955 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States) is an author of books on sports history, particulary in his home state. ...

External links

New York Jets/Titans v  d  e 

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Super Bowl AppearancesIII
Lore – Heidi Game • The GuaranteeThe Monday Night MiracleWest Side Stadium City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... // This article details the history of the New York Jets American Football Club. ... This is a list of seasons completed by the New York Jets American Football Franchise. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... The AFC East refers to the Eastern Division of the American Football Conference of the National Football League. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... Giants Stadium, frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, is the home stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets football teams of the NFL, and the Red Bull New York soccer team of MLS. It is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey in the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which... New Meadowlands Stadium is a planned football stadium. ... Leon Hess (March 13, 1914 – May 7, 1999) [1] was the founder of the Hess Corporation and the owner of the New York Jets. ... Robert Wood Johnson IV (born in April 12, 1947 in New Brunswick, New Jersey is an American businessman, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the owner of the NFLs New York Jets, and a major fundraiser for the 2004 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. ... Harry Wismer (June 30, 1913 – December 3, 1967) was a sports broadcaster and charter owner of what became the New York Jets franchise in the American Football League. ... The Miami Dolphins-New York Jets rivalry is a rivalry between two franchises in the National Football League. ... Fireman Ed (real name Ed Anzalone) is a superfan of the New York Jets,[1] and one of the most well known NFL fans. ... Date January 12, 1969 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Joe Namath, Quarterback Favorite Colts by 18 National anthem Anita Bryant Coin toss Tom Bell Referee Tom Bell Halftime show America Thanks with Florida A&M University Attendance 75,389 TV in the United States Network NBC Announcers... In American football, the Heidi Game (also sometimes called the Heidi Bowl) refers to a famous 1968 American Football League (AFL) game between the New York Jets and the Oakland Raiders, played on November 17 in Oakland, California. ... Date January 12, 1969 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Joe Namath, Quarterback Favorite Colts by 18 National anthem Anita Bryant Coin toss Tom Bell Referee Tom Bell Halftime show America Thanks with Florida A&M University Attendance 75,389 TV in the United States Network NBC Announcers... The term Monday Night Miracle has been adopted in reference to at least two sporting contests. ... An artists rendition of how the West Side Stadium would have looked. ...

Head Coaches

BaughTurnerEwbankWinner • Shipp • HoltzMichaelsWaltonCosletCarrollKotiteParcellsGroh • Edwards • Mangini Samuel Adrian Baugh (born March 17, 1914) is a retired American football player born in Temple, Texas, the second son of James and Lucy Baugh. ... Clyde Douglas (Bulldog) Turner (March 10, 1919 in Plains, Texas, USA - October 30, 1998) was a professional football player for the Chicago Bears. ... Wilbur Weeb Ewbank (May 6, 1907 - November 17, 1998) was an American professional football coach. ... Charley Winner was a football coach whose professional and personal life was closely intertwined with that of Weeb Ewbank, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ... This article is about the American football coach; for other people named Lou Holtz, see Lou Holtz (disambiguation). ... Walt Michaels In 1978. ... Joe Walton(born 1936) A noted coach in college and professional football. ... Bruce Coslet is an American football coach who has been the head coach for the New York Jets and the Cincinnati Bengals. ... Peter C. Carroll (born September 15, 1951, in San Francisco, California) is the current head coach of the University of Southern California Trojans football team, having held that position since 2001. ... Rich Kotite is a former National Football League player and coach. ... Duane Charles Bill Parcells (born August 22, 1941 in Englewood, New Jersey), nicknamed The Big Tuna, is a retired American football head coach, last coaching the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. ... Al Groh (born July 13, 1944 in New York City, New York) is the current head coach of the University of Virginia college football team and the former head coach of the New York Jets of the NFL. Groh has over 38 years of professional and collegiate coaching experience; This... Herman Lee Herm Edwards, Jr. ... Eric Mangini (born January 19, 1971 in Hartford, Connecticut) is the current head coach of the New York Jets of the NFL. At the age of 35, he was the youngest head coach in the NFL, as well as the youngest coach in the four major North American sports, including...

League Championships (1)
1968
Preceded by
first ballpark
Home of the New York Giants
18831888
Succeeded by
Oakland Park
1889
Preceded by
St. George Cricket Grounds
1889
Home of the New York Giants
18891911
Succeeded by
Hilltop Park
1911
Preceded by
Hilltop Park
1911
Home of the New York Giants
19111957
Succeeded by
Seals Stadium
19581959
Preceded by
Hilltop Park
19031912
Home of the New York Yankees
19131922
Succeeded by
Yankee Stadium
19231973
Preceded by
first ballpark
Home of the New York Mets
19621963
Succeeded by
Shea Stadium
1964–present
Preceded by
first ballpark
Home of the New York Giants (NFL)
19251955
Succeeded by
Yankee Stadium
19561973
Preceded by
first ballpark
Home of the New York Titans
19601963
Succeeded by
Shea Stadium
19641983
Preceded by
Comiskey Park
Host of the All-Star Game
1934
Succeeded by
Cleveland Stadium
Preceded by
Briggs Stadium
Host of the All-Star Game
1942
Succeeded by
Shibe Park
Preceded by
Gilmore Stadium
1939 and 1940
Home of the
NFL All-Star Game

1941
Succeeded by
Shibe Park
1942
Preceded by
Croke Park
Dublin
All-Ireland Senior Football Championship
Final Venue

1947
Succeeded by
Croke Park
Dublin

Coordinates: 40°49′51.01″N, 73°56′15.33″W Date January 12, 1969 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Joe Namath, Quarterback Favorite Colts by 18 National anthem Anita Bryant Coin toss Tom Bell Referee Tom Bell Halftime show America Thanks with Florida A&M University Attendance 75,389 TV in the United States Network NBC Announcers... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Oakland Park was the name used for a ball park used by the New York Giants for two games in 1889. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... St. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Seals Stadium was a minor league baseball stadium that stood in San Francisco from 1931 until 1959. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... Cleveland Stadium (also known as Municipal Stadium, Cleveland Municipal Stadium and The Mistake on (or by) the Lake) was a baseball and American football stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Tiger Stadium is a stadium located in the Corktown neighborhood of downtown Detroit, Michigan. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... Shibe Park, known for the last one-third of its existence as Connie Mack Stadium, was a Major League Baseball park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Gilmore Stadium was a multi-use stadium in Los Angeles, California. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... Shibe Park, known for the last one-third of its existence as Connie Mack Stadium, was a Major League Baseball park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ballparks of Baseball-Polo Grounds-New York Giants (797 words)
Polo Grounds inherited a new tenant in 1913 when the New York Yankees moved into the ballpark with the Giants.
Polo Grounds was a hitter paradise with the exception of centerfield.
In 1922, Polo Grounds was enclosed except in centerfield increasing the capacity to 54,555.
Polo Grounds (1609 words)
In 1889, when the Giants were evicted from the original Polo Grounds, they moved uptown to a stadium on the southern parcel of Coogan's Hollow.
The third incarnation of the Polo Grounds burned down on April 14, 1911 and a fourth version was built on the same site with temporary stands for 1911.
Aerial view of the Polo Grounds courtesy of the New York Yankees.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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