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Encyclopedia > Politics of the Republic of China
Politics - Politics portal

Republic of China (Taiwan)
Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a state that currently administers the island groups of Taiwan, the Pescadores, Quemoy, and the Matsu. ...



This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the Republic of China
Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ...

Fundamentals:

Constitution - National Assembly
Three Principles of the People The National Assembly (Chinese: 國民大會, pinyin: Gúomín Dàhùi) was the constitutional convention (and formerly an electoral college) of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Three Principles of the People (Traditional Chinese: 三民主義 ; Pinyin: Sān Mín ZhÇ”yì ; Wade-Giles: San-min Chu-i), also translated as Three Peoples Principles, or collectively Sanmin Doctrine, is a political philosophy developed by Sun Yat-sen as part of a program to make China a...


Executives:
President: Chen Shui-bian
Premier: Su Tseng-chang The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌, pinyin: Sū Zhēngchāng) (born July 28, 1947) is the Secretary-General to the President of the Republic of China and one of the founding members of the Democratic Progressive Party. ...


Branches:
Executive - Legislative - Judicial
Control - Examination
The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ... The Control Yuan building The Control Yuan main entrance The Control Yuan (監察院; pinyin: Jiānchá Yùan), one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei, is a watchdog agency that monitors (controls) the government. ... The Examination Yuan (考試院) is one of five government branches of the Republic of China and is in charge of validating the qualification of civil servants. ...


Parties:
Political parties - Elections Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... Elections in Taiwan gives information on election and election results in the Republic of China (Taiwan). ...


Status:
Political status - Legal status
Independence - Reunification
Taiwan Strait Area The political status of Taiwan is a controversy over whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of Taiwan. ... The legal question of which legal entity holds de jure sovereignty over Taiwan is a controversial issue. ... Chinese (re)unification (Template:Zh-addtsp) is a goal of ass Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of China under a single political entity. ...


Relations:
PRC relations - ROC relations
Cross-Strait - 1 China - 2 systems The foreign relations of the Peoples Republic of China draws upon traditions extending back to China in the Qing dynasty and the Opium Wars, despite China having undergone some radicial upheavals over the past two centuries. ... The Republic of China, now on Taiwan is currently recognised only by 25 countries. ... Taiwan Strait Cross-Strait Relations, or Relations across the Taiwan Strait, deals with the complex relationship and interactions between the Mainland China (which sits on the west of Taiwan_Strait) and Taiwan (which is located in the east of the Strait). ... One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yì; guó liǎng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai), is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ...

The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. Taiwan's two major cities, Taipei and Kaohsiung, are centrally administered municipalities. The rest of Taiwan and the Penghu Islands are administered together as the Province of Taiwan. Kinmen, Matsu, and smaller nearby islands are administered as counties of Fukien (Fujian) Province. Politics of the Republic of China takes place in a framework of a semi-presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President is head of state and the premier (President of the Executive Yuan) is head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and parliament. The party system is dominated by the liberal and pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party and the conservative and pan-Chinese Kuomintang. The Judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature. National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... Quemoy, Kinmen, or Chinmen (金門, pinyin: Jīnmén, POJ: Kim-mn̂g) (pop. ... The Matsu Islands (馬祖列島 or less frequently, 馬祖群島 Pinyin: Mǎzǔ) are a minor archipelago of 19 islands and islets in the Taiwan Strait administered as Lienchiang County (連江 Pinyin: Liánjiāng), Fujian Province of the Republic of China (ROC, based on Taiwan). ... The Pescadores Islands (Chinese: 澎湖群島; Wade-Giles: Peng-hu; Pinyin: Pénghú; Taiwanese POJ: Phêⁿ-ô·-kōan, from Portuguese, fishermen) are an archipelago in the Taiwan Strait. ... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... Abbreviation: Kaohsiung (高雄) City nickname: The Harbor City Capital District Linya Dist. ... Taiwan Province can refer to an existing administrative division under the government of the Republic of China or the claimed 23rd province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Fujian (Chinese: 福建; pinyin: Fújiàn; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal System Pinyin: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of China. ... The semi-presidential system is a system of government that features both a prime minister and a president who are active participants in the day to day functioning of government. ... Representative democracy is a form of democracy and theory of civics in which voters choose (in free, secret, multi-party elections) representatives to act in their interests, but not as their proxies—i. ... It has been suggested that The republican form of government be merged into this article or section. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State in many Commonwealth countries including the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand, the Bahamas and many more, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, tone, style, and voice). ... Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The judiciary, also referred to as the judicature, consists of the system of courts of law for the administration of justice and to its principals, the justices, judges and magistrates among other types of adjudicators. ...

Contents


Overview

The ROC is governed under the Constitution of the Republic of China which was drafted in 1947 before the fall of Mainland China and outlined a government for all of China. Significant amendments were made to the Constitution in 1991, and there have been a number of judicial interpretations made to take into account the fact that the Constitution covers a much smaller area than originally envisioned. Previously the ROC-KMT government in Taiwan governed as a one party authoritarian state, disseminating propaganda and censoring opponents. The Constitution of the Republic of China (traditional Chinese: 中華民國憲法; Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó Xiànfǎ; Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó SiànFǎ) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China, namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A single-party state or one-party system or single-party system is a type of party system and form of government where only a single political party dominates the government and no opposition parties are allowed. ... Propaganda has been an important tool of the Republic of China government since its inception in 1912. ... During its time as a one-party authoritarian state, the Kuomintang-Republic of China exercised strict control of the media. ...


Until 1991, the government in Taipei claimed to be the sole legitimate government of all of China, including the mainland, Tibet, and outer Mongolia. In keeping with that claim, when the Nationalists (Kuomintang) fled to Taipei in 1949, they re-established the full array of central political bodies, which had existed on the mainland in Nanking. While much of this structure remains in place, the President Lee Teng-hui in 1991 unofficially abandoned the government's claim of sovereignty over mainland China, stating that they do not "dispute the fact that the Communists control mainland China." However, the National Assembly has not officially changed the national borders, as doing so would be seen as a prelude to Taiwan independence. It should be noted that neither the National Assembly nor the Supreme Court has actually defined what "existing national boundaries", as stated in the constitution, actually is. The latter refused to do so claiming that it is a "major political issue". City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Outer Mongolia makes up Mongolia (presently a sovereign state) and Tannu Uriankhai (the majority of which is the modern-day Tuva Republic, a federal subject of the Russian Federation), while Inner Mongolia (内蒙古; Nèi MÄ›nggÇ”) is an autonomous region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Nanjing (Chinese: 南京; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Nan-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Nanking), is the capital of Chinas Jiangsu Province and a city with a prominent place in Chinese history and culture. ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional: 李登輝; Simplified: 李登辉; Hanyu Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Communist Party of China flag The Communist Party of China (CPC) or Chinese Communist Party (CCP) (Simplified: 中国共产党; Traditional: 中國共産黨; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The National Assembly (Chinese: 國民大會, pinyin: Gúomín Dàhùi) was the constitutional convention (and formerly an electoral college) of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands...


See also: political status of Taiwan Taiwan Strait Area The political status of Taiwan is a controversy over whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of Taiwan. ...


National Assembly and Constitutional Amendments

The National Assembly of the Republic of China was elected on the mainland in 1947 officially to carry out the duties of choosing the president and to amend the constitution, and to exercise the sovereignty of the citizens, but in actuality, the assembly was meant to reconfirm the authoritarian power of Chiang Kai-shek. The National Assembly was re-established on Taiwan when the government moved. Because it was impossible to hold subsequent elections to represent constituencies on the mainland, representatives elected in 1947-48 held these seats "indefinitely." In June 1990, however, the Council of Grand Justices mandated the retirement, effective December 1991, of all remaining "indefinitely" elected members of the National Assembly, Legislative Yuan, and other bodies. The National Assembly (Chinese: 國民大會, pinyin: Gúomín Dàhùi) was the constitutional convention (and formerly an electoral college) of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... This article is about the year. ...


The second National Assembly, elected in 1991, was composed of 325 members. The majority was elected directly; 100 were chosen from party slates in proportion to the popular vote. This National Assembly amended the constitution in 1994, paving the way for the direct election of the president and vice president that was held in March 1996. The National Assembly retained the authority to amend the constitution, recall or impeach the president and the vice president, and ratify certain senior-level presidential appointments. In April 2000, the members of the National Assembly voted to permit their terms of office to expire without holding new elections. They also determined that such an election would be called in the event the National Assembly is needed to decide a presidential recall or a constitutional amendment. In recent years, the National Assembly has handed most of its powers to the Legislative Yuan, including the power of impeachment. In 2005, the National Assembly permanently abolished itself by ratifying a constitution amendment passed by the Legislative Yuan. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


Passing an amendment to the ROC constitution now requires approval from three-fourths of the quorum of members of the Legislative Yuan. This quorum requires at least three-fourths of all members of the Legislature. After passing the legislature, the amendments needs ratification from at least fifty percent of all eligible voters of the ROC regardless of voter turnout.


Executive branch

Office Name Party Since
President Chen Shui-bian DPP 20 May 2000
Vice President Annette Lu DPP 20 May 2000
Premier Su Tseng-chang DPP 25 January 2006
Vice President Executive Yuan Tsai Ing-wen

The president is both head of state and commander-in-chief of its armed forces. The president has authority over the five administrative branches (Yuan): Executive, Legislative, Control, Judicial, and Examination. The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Hsiu-lien Annette Lu (呂秀蓮, pinyin: LÇš Xiùlián) (born June 7, 1944) is the vice president of Republic of China on Taiwan and a politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ... Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌, pinyin: Sū Zhēngchāng) (born July 28, 1947) is the Secretary-General to the President of the Republic of China and one of the founding members of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State in many Commonwealth countries including the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand, the Bahamas and many more, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... The Republic of China (ROC) maintains a large military establishment, which will account for 16. ...


The Executive Yuan comprises the premier, vice-premier, and the cabinet members who are responsible for policy and administration. The president appoints the Premier, who is officially the President of the Executive Yuan. The Executive Yuan (行政院; literally executive court) is the executive branch of the government of the Republic of China. ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ...


Legislative branch

The main lawmaking body, the Legislative Yuan (LY), was originally elected in 1947. The first LY had 773 seats and was viewed as a "rubber stamp" institution. Like the National Assembly, representatives elected in 1947-48 held these seats "indefinitely" until the 1991 ruling. The second LY was elected in 1992. The third LY, elected in 1995, had 157 members serving 3-year terms. The fourth LY, elected in 1998, was expanded to 225 members. The LY has greatly enhanced its standing in relation to the Executive Yuan and has established itself as an important player on the central level. Along with increasing strength and size this body is beginning to reflect the recently liberalized political system. In the 1992 and 1995 elections, the main opposition party — the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) — challenged the Kuomintang (KMT) dominance of the Legislature. In both elections the DPP won a significant share of the LY seats, and the KMT held only half the seats in the LY. In 1998, however, the KMT increased its LY majority from 50% to 55% and continued to play a dominant role in the legislature as the leading opposition party. In the 2001 election, the DPP became the largest party after large losses suffered by the KMT. The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ...


Judicial branch

The Judicial Yuan (JY) administers the ROC's court system. It includes a 16-member Council of Grand Justices (COGJ) that interprets the constitution. Grand Justices are appointed by the President, with the consent of the Legislative Yuan, to 9-year terms. President of the Judicial Yuan is Weng Yueh-sheng. The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ...


Other Yuans

The Control Yuan (CY) monitors the efficiency of public service and investigates instances of corruption. The 29 Control Yuan members are appointed by the president and approved by the Legislative Yuan; they serve 6-year terms. In recent years, the Control Yuan has become more activist, and it has conducted several major investigations and impeachments. The Control Yuan building The Control Yuan main entrance The Control Yuan (監察院; pinyin: Jiānchá Yùan), one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei, is a watchdog agency that monitors (controls) the government. ...


The Examination Yuan (ExY) functions as a civil service commission and includes two ministries: the Ministry of Examination, which recruits officials through competitive examination, and the Ministry of Personnel, which manages the civil service. The President appoints the Examination Yuan's President. President of the Examination Yuan is Yao Chia-wen. The Examination Yuan (考試院) is one of five government branches of the Republic of China and is in charge of validating the qualification of civil servants. ...


Political parties and elections

Election results include names of political parties. See for additional information about parties the List of political parties in the Republic of China. An overview on elections and election results is included in Elections in the Republic of China.
Summary of the 20 March 2004 Republic of China presidential election results
Candidates and nominating parties Votes % Votes
before recount
Chen Shui-bian and Lu Hsiu-lien A.
6,446,900 50.11 6,471,970
Lien Chan and James C.Y. Soong
6,423,906 49.89 6,442,452
Total (turnout 80.28 %) 12,914,422 100,0
Invalid votes 337,297
Votes cast 13,251,719
Main article: ROC presidential election, 2004
Summary of the 11 December 2004 Republic of China Legislative Yuan election results
Coalitions and parties Votes % Seats Change
Pan-Blue Coalition 114
Kuomintang/Nationalist Party of China 中國國民黨 (Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang) 3,190,081 34.90 79 +11
People First Party 親民黨 (Ch'in Min Tang) 1,350,613 14.78 34 –12
New Party 新黨 (Hsin-Tang) 12,137 0.13 1
Pan-Green Coalition 101
Democratic Progressive Party 民主進步黨 (Minchu Chinpu Tang) 3,471,429 37.98 89 +2
Taiwan Solidarity Union 台灣團結聯盟 (Taiwan Tuanjie Lianmeng) 756,712 8.28 12 –1
Others 10
無盟 Non-Partisan Solidarity Union 無黨團結聯盟 (Wudang Tuanjie Lianmeng) 353,164 3.86 6 –5
Non-party 4
Total (turnout ) 9,140,067 225
5% vote threshold needed for proportional seat assignment
Main article: ROC legislative election, 2004

In 2005 the ROC elected a National Assembly to amend the constitution. After the adoption of the amendments, the National Assembly was abolished. An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... See Election (movie) for the film directed by Alexander Payne. ... Elections in Taiwan gives information on election and election results in the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Hsiu-lien Annette Lu (呂秀蓮, pinyin: LÇš Xiùlián) (born June 7, 1944) is the vice president of Republic of China on Taiwan and a politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng ChÇ”yú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jÅ«n), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jÅ«n), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Download high resolution version (891x587, 55 KB)From zh:Image:Pfp. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Image File history File links New_Party_(Taiwan). ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... This work is copyrighted. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... This work is copyrighted. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... The Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU, Chinese: 無黨團結聯盟, pinyin: w dǎng t is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ...

Summary of the 14 May 2005 Republic of China National Assembly election results Votes % Seats
Parties in favor of the amendments 249
Democratic Progressive Party 民主進步黨 1,647,791 42.52 127
Kuomintang 中國國民黨 1,508,384 38.92 117
___ Chinese People's Party 41,940 1.08 3
___ Peasant Party 15,516 0.40 1
___ Civil Party 8,609 0.22 1
Parties not in favor of the amendments 51
Taiwan Solidarity Union 台灣團結聯盟 273,147 7.05 21
People First Party 親民黨 236,716 6.11 18
___ 150 persons union led by Jhang Ya Jhong 65,081 1.68 5
Chinese New Party 新黨 34,253 0.88 3
Non-Partisan Solidarity Union 無黨團結聯盟 25,162 0.65 2
Taiwan Independence Party 11,500 0.30 1
___ 20 persons union led by Wang Ting Sing 7,499 0.19 1
Total (turnout ) 300
Main article: ROC National Assembly election, 2005
campaign flags in Taipei during a city council election 2002
campaign flags in Taipei during a city council election 2002

As of November 2004, there are 108 officially registered parties in the Republic of China. Other parties than the parties listed above include: This work is copyrighted. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The Chinese Peoples Party is a small political party in Taiwan (Republic of China), that won three seats in the National Assembly election of 2005. ... The Peasant Party (農民黨; pinyin: NóngmíndÇŽng) is a minor party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Civil Party is a small political party in the Republic of China (Taiwan) that won one seat in the National Assembly election of 2005. ... This work is copyrighted. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... Download high resolution version (891x587, 55 KB)From zh:Image:Pfp. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Image File history File links New_Party_(Taiwan). ... The New Party (新黨, xÄ«ndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xÄ«ndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... This work is copyrighted. ... The Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU, Chinese: 無黨團結聯盟, pinyin: w dǎng t is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... This work is copyrighted. ... TAIP Flag and Logo The Taiwan Independence Party (建國黨, in pinyin: jiàn guó da3ng, literal meaning: Nation-establishing Party) (TAIP) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... An election for the National Assembly will be held in the Republic of China on Taiwan on Saturday 2005-05-14, from 07:30 to 16:00 local time. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

The aftermath of the 2000 Presidential election and the 2001 legislative election left the ROC fragmented among several political parties. These parties can be divided into "blue" factions (Pan-Blue Coalition) and "green" factions (Pan-Green Coalition), with the "blue" faction tending toward unification and a national identity that is linked with China and the "green" faction leaning toward a national identity based on Taiwan independence which is separate from the Chinese national identity. The complex structure of the party system in the ROC is also influenced by the voting system which uses single non-transferable vote for legislative elections and first past the post for executive elections. Taiwan Number One Party (台灣吾黨; pinyin: Táiwān wúdÇŽng) is a small political party in Taiwan. ... The Natural Law Party is a trans-national political party with national branches in over 80 countries. ... TAIP Flag and Logo The Taiwan Independence Party (建國黨, in pinyin: jiàn guó da3ng, literal meaning: Nation-establishing Party) (TAIP) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Green Party Taiwan (綠黨) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan, active in the late 20th century, established on 25 January 1996. ... The Election for the 10th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (第十任中華民國總統、副總統選舉), the second ever direct elections for President and Vice President of the Republic of China on Taiwan and the 10th under the 1947 Constitution, were held on March 18, 2000. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jÅ«n), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands... The Single Non-Transferable Vote or SNTV is an electoral system used in multi-member constituency elections. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ...


The "blue" faction comes from the color of the Kuomintang and includes the Kuomintang, the People First Party, and the New Party. The "green" faction comes from the color of the Democratic Progressive Party and includes the Democratic Progressive Party and the Taiwan Solidarity Union. The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ...


The Kuomintang (Nationalist Party) - Until 1986, Taiwan's political system was effectively controlled by one party, the KMT, the leader of which also was the ROC president. Many top political officials were members of the party. The party claimed over 2 million members, and its net assets were reputed to total more than NT $61.2 billion, making it the richest political party in the world.


The Democratic Progressive Party - After 1986, the KMT's hold on power was challenged by the emergence of competing political parties. Before 1986, candidates opposing the KMT ran in elections as independents or "nonpartisans." Before the 1986 island-wide elections many "nonpartisans" grouped together to create Taiwan's first new political party, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). Despite the official ban on forming new political parties, Taiwan authorities did not prohibit the DPP from operating, and in the 1986 Island-wide elections DPP and independent candidates captured more than 20% of the vote.


The Civic Organizations Law passed in 1989 allowed for the formation of new political parties, thereby legalizing the DPP, and its support and influence increased. In the 1992 Legislative Yuan elections, the DPP won 51 seats in the 161-seat body. While this was only half the number of KMT seats, it made the DPP's voice an important factor in legislative decisions. Winning the Taipei mayor's position in December 1994, significantly enhanced the DPP's image. The DPP continued its strong showing in the 1995 LY race, winning 45 of the 157 seats to the KMT's 81. The DPP for the first time succeeded in outpolling the KMT in the November 1997 local elections, gaining 12 of the 23 magistrate and mayoral seats as opposed to the KMT's 8 and winning 43% of the vote versus the KMT's 41%.


The DPP membership is made up largely of native Taiwanese. The DPP maintains that Taiwan is an entity separate from mainland China and supports an independent "Republic of Taiwan" as part of its platform. The recent downplaying of Taiwan independence by the DPP as a party, however, led to the formation by hard-line advocates of a new political party called the Taiwan Independence Party in December 1996.


The New Party (NP) - was formed in August 1993, by a group made up largely of second-generation mainlander KMT members who were unhappy both with corruption in the KMT and with what they saw as the "Taiwanization" of KMT ideology and leadership. The NP emphasizes "clean government" and the original KMT focus on reunification with the mainland. NP influence remains modest and seems on the wane; it won 21 of the 164 LY seats in the 1995 elections but only 11 of 225 seats in 1998. The New Party was almost annihilated in the 2001 election as its members defected to the Peoples First Party. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Mainlanders are Chinese people who live, or were born, in mainland China as opposed to Hong Kong, Macao, or Taiwan. ...


The People's First Party (PFP) - A new opposition party was formed in the wake of the March 2000 presidential election by the runner up, a KMT maverick candidate. The People's First Party is composed primarily of former KMT and NP members who supported former KMT Taiwan Provincial Governor James Soong's presidential bid. The PFP currently had 17 members in the LY before the 2001 election, but increased its representation to over 40 in that election. Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng Chǔyú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


The Taiwan Solidarity Union - In 2001, supporters of former President Lee founded the Taiwanese Solidarity Union (TSU). Even though Lee did not join this party, he is named its spiritual leader and most believe he endorsed it. The TSU was formed primarily because, as it took power, the DPP had to moderate its standing as regards to Taiwan independence, leaving a hole in the Taiwanese political spectrum. In a bid to help the "green" side achieve control in the Legislative Yuan, the TSU was formed to attract the radical votes left over from DPP and the localist support for KMT. The TSU had often expressed that it wanted to be the "decisive minority".


Although some friction between mainlanders and native Taiwanese still exists, it has abated with time, and there has been a gradual melding of the two communities. In 1972, then-Premier Chiang Ching-kuo began a concentrated effort to bring Taiwanese into more senior position in the central administration and the KMT. Upon his accession to the presidency in January 1988, Lee Teng-hui, who is a native Taiwanese, continued this process. Steps by the government to redress past wrongs such as setting up a memorial to the victims of the February 28 Incident have contributed to this process. Mainlanders are Chinese people who live, or were born, in mainland China as opposed to Hong Kong, Macao, or Taiwan. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Tuesday. ... During the 228 Incident, a crowd of angry people gathered in downtown Taipei. ...


Political conditions

This change in the political process is the result of the liberalizing trend that began in the 1980s under President Chiang Ching-kuo. In 1987, he lifted the emergency decree, which had been in place since 1948 and which had granted virtually unlimited powers to the president for use in the anti-communist campaign. This decree provided the basis for nearly four decades of martial law under which individuals and groups expressing dissenting views were dealt with harshly. Expressing views contrary to the authorities' claim to represent all of China or supporting independent Taiwan independence was treated as sedition. Vice-President Lee Teng-hui succeeded Chiang Ching-kuo as president when Chiang died on January 13, 1988. Lee was elected by the National Assembly to a 6-year term in 1990, marking the final time a president was elected by the National Assembly. The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... Chiang Ching-kuo (蔣經國) Chiang Ching-kuo (Chinese: 蔣經國; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chiang Ching-kuo) (April 271, 1910 - January 13, 1988), Kuomintang politician and leader, was the son of Chiang Kai-shek and held numerous posts in the government of the Republic of China (from 1949 on Taiwan). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


Since ending martial law, the Republic of China has taken dramatic steps to improve respect for human rights and create a democratic political system. Most restrictions on the press have ended, restrictions on personal freedoms have been relaxed, and the prohibition against organizing new political parties has been lifted.


As the National Assembly took action in 1994 to allow for the popular election of the president, the LY in 1994 passed legislation to allow for the direct election of the governor of Taiwan Province and the mayors of Taipei and Kaohsiung Municipalities. These elections were held in December 1994, with the KMT winning the governor and Kaohsiung mayor posts, and the DPP winning the Taipei mayor's position. In March 1996, Lee Teng-hui was elected president and Lien Chan vice president in the first direct election by Taiwan's voters. In 1998, the KMT's Ma Ying-jeou wrestled back control of the mayorship of Taipei from the opposition DPP's most prominent figure Chen Shui-bian. In the same elections, however, the DPP's Frank Hsieh managed to defeat Kaoshiung's KMT incumbent. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Taiwan Province can refer to an existing administrative division under the government of the Republic of China or the claimed 23rd province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... Abbreviation: Kaohsiung (高雄) City nickname: The Harbor City Capital District Linya Dist. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional: 李登輝; Simplified: 李登辉; Hanyu Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Election for the 9th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (第九任中華民國總統 、副總統選舉), the first ever direct elections for President and Vice President of the Republic of China on Taiwan, occurred on March 23, 1996. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九; Hanyu Pinyin: MÇŽ YÄ«ngjiÇ”; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu; Tongyong Pinyin: Ma Yingjiou) (born July 13, 1950) was elected mayor of Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China in 1998 and reelected in 2002. ... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Frank Chang-ting Hsieh (Chinese: 謝長廷; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsieh Chang Ting; Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Siā Tiông-têng or Chiā Tiông-têng) (born May 18, 1946), a politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, was the mayor of Kaohsiung City until his appointment as...


The position of elected governor and many other elements of the Taiwan Provincial Government were eliminated at the end of 1998. The stated purpose of this was to streamline administrative efficiency, but some commentators have argued that this was also intended to weaken the power base of Governor James Soong. In November 1997 local elections, the DPP won 12 of the 23 county magistrate and city mayor contests to the KMT's 8, outpolling the KMT for the first time in a major election. Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng Chǔyú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In March 2000, Democratic Progressive Party candidate Chen Shui-bian became the first opposition party candidate to win the presidency. His victory resulted in the first-ever transition of the presidential office from one political party to another in the ROC. The election also had the effect of splitting the KMT's support base. James Soong launched an independent bid for the presidency after failing to be nominated by the party. In response the KMT expelled Soong and his supporters. Soong and his supporters blamed then-KMT Chairman Lee Teng-hui of harboring pro-independence sentiments and purposely trying to aid Chen Shui-bian by splitting the KMT's vote by running the less charasmatic Lien Chan along with Soong. After losing the vote narrowly to Chen and ahead of Lien, Soong established the People First Party. Lee Teng-hui was soon forced out of the KMT Chairmanship amid popular protests and riots demanding he take responsibility for the KMT's defeat. The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Election for the 10th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (第十任中華民國總統、副總統選舉), the second ever direct elections for President and Vice President of the Republic of China on Taiwan and the 10th under the 1947 Constitution, were held on March 18, 2000. ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional: 李登輝; Simplified: 李登辉; Hanyu Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


In the months following the 2000 presidential election, Lee Teng-hui's supporters established the Taiwan Solidarity Union, which advocated a more radical brand of Taiwan independence than the DPP. For this, Lee was expelled from the KMT and the KMT gradually moved itself to a more conservative and pro-reunificationist position. This permitted the formation of two rival coalitions that have since dominated Taiwanese politics: the Pan-Blue Coalition formed by the Kuomintang, People First Party, and New Party and the Pan-Green Coalition formed by the Democratic Progressive Party and Taiwan Solidarity Union. The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ...


In the 2001 LY elections, the DPP won a plurality of seats for the first time. However, the Pan-Blue Coalition held a small majority over the Pan-Green Coalition, causing much of President Chen's agenda to be derailed. This also gave independents in the legislature more power, some of whom founded the Non-Partisan Solidarity Union in 2004. The Election for the 5th Legislative Yuan (第五屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan was held on December 1, 2001. ... The Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU, Chinese: 無黨團結聯盟, pinyin: w dǎng t is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


In a hotly contested election on March 20, 2004, President Chen Shui-bian was re-elected by 50.1% of the popular vote to a second term. The election was marred by a shooting incident the day before the election during which President Chen and his running mate Vice President Annette Lu were slightly wounded. While the opposition contested the results and suggested the shooting was staged to win sympathy (as President Chen had previously been slated to lose narrowly), it was the first time that the DPP has won an outright majority in an island-wide election. Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chen and Lu, only minutes before the shooting incident On March 19, 2004, the day before the Republic of China presidential election, President Chen Shui-bian and Vice President Annette Lu were both shot while campaigning in Tainan, in what then appeared to be a political assassination attempt. ...


The March election also included a "peace referendum." Historically, the issue of referenda has been closely tied to the question of Taiwan independence, and thus has been a sensitive issue in cross Strait relations. There were two referenda before the voters on March 20, 2004. The first asked in light of the PRC missile threat whether the ROC should purchase anti-missile systems. The second asked whether Taiwan should adopt a "peace framework" for addressing cross Strait differences with the PRC. However both referenda failed to obtain support from over 50% of registered voters, as required to be valid. The Pan-Blue Coalition campaigned against the referendum as unnecessary and urged voters to boycott it. A nation-wide consultative referendum (全國性公民投票) was held in the Republic of China (Taiwan) on March 20, 2004 to coincide with the 2004 presidential election. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


President Chen Shui-bian has called for major constitutional reforms by 2006 aimed at further reducing layers of government, and making other structural changes aimed at improving governance. The People's Republic of China has accused Chen of using the constitution issue to move Taiwan towards independence. He expressed opposition, however, in his May 20, 2004 inaugural address to using constitutional reform to alter the constitution's definition of Taiwan sovereignty. 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Legislative Yuan passed a set of constitutional amendments on August 23, 2004 that halve the number of LY seats and create single-member districts. The revisions also eliminate the role of the National Assembly and permit the public to confirm or reject future revisions passed by the LY. These constitutional amendments were ratified by the National Assembly in 2005. August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Prior to the December 11, 2004 elections to the Legislative Yuan, signs indicated that the DPP would for the first time dominate the Legislative Yuan. Polls projected a huge pan-green victory, and the DPP's election tactics were based on them. This over-reliance on polls resulted in a huge set back. The pan-blue opposition managed to maintain their majority status within the Legislative Yuan, winning 114 seats out of the 225 seats. The Pan-Green only managed to win 101 seats. The remaining 10 seats were won by the independent candidates. Although the Pan-Green coalition increased their seats by one and the DPP remained the largest party, because of raised hopes the election was viewed as a disaster, and President Chen resigned his post as Chairman of DPP as a result. December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On December 3, 2005, the KMT made major gains in municipal elections, taking 14 of 23 mayor or county magistrate seats, while the DPP retained only six seats of their previous 10. The pan-blue People First Party and New Party each took one seat, and an independent won one seat. The pan-green TSU was completely shut out. DPP chairman Su Tseng-chang had promised to resign to take responsibility for the defeat. This dramatic setback for the DPP and pan-greens was seen as a reaction to recent corruption scandals, and public disapproval of Chen Shui-Bian's apparent refusal to improve cross-strait relations. December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Taiwan and the Mainland

See also Cross-Strait relations

Despite the differences between Taiwan and mainland China, contact between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait has grown significantly over the past decade. The ROC has continued to relax restrictions on unofficial contacts with the PRC, and cross-Strait interaction has mushroomed. Since 1987, when the ban on travel to the mainland was lifted, Taiwan residents have made more than 10 million trips to the mainland. The ROC Bureau of Foreign Trade estimates that indirect trade with the mainland reached about US$61.639 billion, or 18% of the total trade of the ROC, in 2004. This indirect trade runs heavily in Taiwan's favor, providing another outlet for the island's booming economy. In an attempt to facilitate trade, in 1995 the Executive Yuan approved the construction of an offshore transshipment center at the port of Kaohsiung through which direct shipping with the mainland would be permitted. In April 1997 the first sanctioned direct cross-Strait shipping began between selected mainland ports and Kaohsiung for cargo being transshipped through Taiwan. Taiwan Strait Cross-Strait Relations, or Relations across the Taiwan Strait, deals with the complex relationship and interactions between the Mainland China (which sits on the west of Taiwan_Strait) and Taiwan (which is located in the east of the Strait). ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Taiwan Strait Area The Taiwan Strait or Formosa Strait is a 180km-wide Strait between mainland China and the island of Taiwan. ...


Beijing has expressed a mixed view of these developments. PRC leaders are pleased at the development of economic ties and exchanges, which they believe helps their cause of reunification. However, the increase in contacts, combined with domestic political liberalization on Taiwan, also has resulted in more open discussion in Taiwan of the future of Taiwan, including the option of independence, to which Beijing is strongly opposed. (help· info), a city in northern China, is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ...


The trend in cross-Strait interaction is one of steady growth with, so far, only temporary setbacks due to political factors such as Lee Teng-hui's private visit to the U.S. in 1995 and his 1999 characterization of relations with the mainland as "state-to-state." Taiwan business representatives have concerns about issues such as safety, corruption, and contract disputes, which have led to increased caution and a search for alternative investment venues but not to pulling out from the mainland altogether. President Chen has yet to revise the previous administration's "no haste, be patient" policy regarding Taiwan-mainland investment to prevent over-dependence on the PRC. As a result of this policy the ROC has placed restrictions on largescale infrastructure investments on the mainland in 1997. Despite this, billions of dollars have been invested in the mainland by smaller firms.


The development of semiofficial cross-Strait relations has been incremental. Prior to April 1993, when talks were held in Singapore between the heads of two private intermediary organizations — Taiwan's Straits Exchange Foundation (SEF) and the mainland's Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits (ARATS) — there had been some lower-level exchanges between the two sides of the Strait. The April 1993 SEF-ARATS talks primarily addressed technical issues relating to cross-Strait interactions. Lower-level talks continued on a fairly regular basis until they were suspended by Beijing in 1995 after President Lee's U.S. visit. Unofficial exchanges resumed in 1997 through informal meetings between personnel of the two sides' unofficial representative organizations. Direct SEF-ARATS contacts resumed in April 1998, and the SEF Chairman visited the mainland in October 1998. A planned visit by ARATS Chairman Wang Daohan to Taiwan in the fall, however, was postponed following statements made by then-President Lee Teng-hui that relations between the mainland and Taiwan should be conducted as "state-to-state" or at least as "special state-to-state relations." Since his May 20, 2000 inauguration, President Chen has called for resuming the cross-Strait dialogue without any preconditions. President Chen has stated that such talks should be conducted on the basis of the "spirit of 1992," a reference to the agreement to hold the 1993 Singapore talks. The PRC, however, has insisted that President Chen must recognize the one China principle before talks can be held. The Straits Exchange Foundation (SEF) (海峽交流基金會) is a semi-official organization set up by the Republic of China government to handle technical or business matters with the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits (ARATS) (海峽兩岸關係協會) is an organization set up by the Peoples Republic of China for handling technical or business matters with the Republic of China. ... Wang Daohan (汪道涵), is the current president of the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits (ARATS). ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The One-China policy (Chinese: 一個中國) is the principle that there is one China and both mainland China and Taiwan are part of that China. ...


As of December, 2005, almost two-thirds of people in the ROC favoured direct flights with the mainland, and increasing the number of tourists allowed to visit the island from the mainland. Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Administrative divisions

Main article: Political divisions of the Republic of China The Republic of China (ROC) currently administers two historical provinces of China (one completely and one for a small part) and centrally administers two municipalities: Taiwan Province; consists of the island of Taiwan, except the two municipalities, plus Penghu county (Pescadores Islands) and a number of outlying islands Sixteen counties...


The Republic of China currently administers Fujian (Fukien) Province (some 20 offshore islands including Quemoy and Matsu), Taiwan Province (the island of Taiwan and the Pescadores Islands), and centrally administers two cities; note - the more commonly referenced administrative divisions are those of Taiwan island - 16 counties (sian, singular and plural), 5 municipalities* (shih, singular and plural), and 2 special municipalities** (Jhihsia Shih, singular and plural): Quemoy, Kinmen, or Chinmen (金門, pinyin: Jīnmén, POJ: Kim-mn̂g) (pop. ... The Matsu Islands (馬祖列島 or less frequently, 馬祖群島 Pinyin: MÇŽzÇ”) are a minor archipelago of 19 islands and islets in the Taiwan Strait administered as Lienchiang County (連江 Pinyin: Liánjiāng), Fukien Province of the Republic of China (ROC, now based on Taiwan). ... Taiwan Province can refer to an existing administrative division under the government of the Republic of China or the claimed 23rd province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Pescadores Islands (Chinese: 澎湖群島; Wade-Giles: Peng-hu; Pinyin: Pénghú; Taiwanese POJ: Phêⁿ-ô·-kōan, from Portuguese, fishermen) are an archipelago in the Taiwan Strait. ...


Changhua, Chiayi, Chiayi*, Keelung*, Hsinchu, Hsinchu*, Hualien, Yilan, Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung**, Miaoli, Nantou, Penghu, Pingtung, Taichung, Taichung*, Tainan, Tainan*, Taipei, Taipei**, Taitung, Taoyuan, and Yunlin, the provincial capital is at Jhongsing Village Changhua County (彰化縣, pinyin: Zhānghuà Xiàn) is a county in western Taiwan administered as part of Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. ... Chiayi County (嘉義縣, pinyin: Jiāyì Xiàn) is a county in southwestern Taiwan encompassing Chiayi City and administered as part of Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. ... Chiayi City (嘉義市, pinyin: Jiāyì Shì, Taiwanese: Ka-gī chhī) is a city in Southwestern Taiwan. ... Keelung (基隆 Pinyin: Jīlóng, Wade-Giles: Chi-lung) is a county-level city of Taiwan Province, Republic of China. ... Hsinchu County (新竹縣, pinyin: Xīnzhú Xiàn) is a county in northwestern Taiwan. ... Hsinchu (新竹 pinyin XÄ«nzhú, Taiwanese: Sin-tek) is a large city in northern Taiwan. ... Hualien City (Chinese: 花蓮市; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hua-lien; POJ: Hoa-liân-chhÄ«) is the capital of Hualien County, Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. ... Yilan City (宜蘭市), commonly and historically spelled Ilan or I-lan (Wade-Giles), is the capital of Yilan County in the Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. ... Kaohsiung County (高雄縣, pinyin: Gāoxióng Xiàn) is a county in southern Taiwan administered as part of Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. ... Abbreviation: Kaohsiung (高雄) City nickname: The Harbor City Capital District Linya Dist. ... Miaoli County (苗栗縣, pinyin: Miáolì Xiàn) is a county in western Taiwan administered as part of Taiwan Province in the Republic of China. ... Nantou is the name of several places: Nantou County (南投縣) of Taiwan Nantou City (南投市) a city in Nantou County Nantou, Guangdong (南头镇) a town in the Guangdong province This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Pescadores Islands (Chinese: 澎湖群島; Wade-Giles: Peng-hu; Pinyin: Pénghú, from Portuguese, fishermen) are an archipelago in the Taiwan Strait. ... Pingtung County (屏東縣, pinyin: Píngdōng Xiàn) is a county in Southern Taiwan. ... Taichung County (台中縣, pinyin: Táizhōng Xiàn) is a county in central Taiwan, encompassing Taichung City and administered as part of Taiwan Province of the Republic of China. ... Taichung (Chinese: 台中; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Tai-chung; POJ: Tâi-tiong) is a city located in west-central Taiwan with a population of just over one million people, making it the third largest city on the island, after Taipei and Kaohsiung. ... Tainan County (台南縣, pinyin: Táinán Xiàn) is a county in Southern Taiwan . ... Tainan redirects here; for the county of the same name see Tainan County Tainan (Chinese: 台南; Hanyu Pinyin: Táinán, Wade-Giles: Tai-nan; POJ: Tâi-lâm) is a city located in southern Taiwan and is the fourth largest after Taipei, Kaohsiung and Taichung. ... Taipei County (Chinese: 台北縣; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Tai-pei Hsien; POJ: Tâi-pak-koān) is located in northern Taiwan and encircles Taipei City. ... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... Taitung County (台東縣, pinyin: Táidōng Xiàn; Taiwanese POJ: Tâi-tang-kōan) is a county in Eastern Taiwan, administered as part of Taiwan Province in the Republic of China. ... Taoyuan is names of places in China which are following: Taoyuan (桃园市、桃園市,pinyin:táo yuán shì) is a city located in Taiwan, see Taoyuan City Taoyuan (桃园县、桃園縣,pinyin:táo yuán xiàn) is a county in Taiwan, see Taoyuan County (Taiwan) Taoyuan (桃源县、桃源縣,pinyin:táo yuán xiàn) is... Yunlin County (雲林縣, pinyin: Yúnlín Xiàn) is a county in Western Taiwan. ... Jhongsing Village (中興新村 WG: Chung-hsing-hsin-tsun, Pinyin: ZhōngxÄ«ngxÄ«ncÅ«n) is located in Nantou County, Taiwan and is the seat of the Taiwan provincial government. ...


See also


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