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Encyclopedia > Politics of Tokyo
Japan

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Japan
Image File history File links Imperial_Seal_of_Japan. ... Japan has a parliamentary government, which consists of three branches: the administration (executive) branch, the legislative branch and the judicial branch. ...









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Japan has a parliamentary government, which consists of three branches: the administration (executive) branch, the legislative branch and the judicial branch. ... His Imperial Majesty, Emperor Akihito. ... The following is a traditional list of Emperors of Japan. ... Emperor Akihito of Japan (Japanese: 明仁) (born December 23, 1933) is the current Emperor (天皇, tennō) of Japan and the 125th according to the traditional order of succession. ... The Imperial Household Agency is a government agency of Japan in charge of the state matters concerning Japans royal family. ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the English political nomenclature of the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... This is a historical list of individuals who have served as Prime Minister of Japan. ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is the current Prime Minister of Japan. ... The Cabinet (内閣, Naikaku) is the executive branch of the government of Japan. ... The most influential part of the executive of the Japanese government are the ministries. ... This article is about the Japanese legislature. ... The House of Councillors (参議院; Sangi-in) is the upper house of the Diet of Japan. ... The House of Representatives (衆議院; Shugi-in) is the lower house of the Diet of Japan. ... In the Judicial System of Japan, the postwar constitution guarantees that all judges shall be independent in the exercise of their conscience and shall be bound only by this constitution and the Laws (Article 76). ... Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Japan ... Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on February 18, 1990. ... Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on July 18, 1993. ... A general election took place in Japan on October 20, 1996. ... Elections to the Shugi-In (House of Representatives) of the Japanese Diet were held on 25 June 2000. ... Incumbent Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi A general election took place in Japan on November 9, 2003. ... Elections to the House of Councillors, the upper house of the legislature of Japan, were held on July 11, 2004. ... For a breakdown of the results by block district with maps, see Results of Japan general election, 2005 Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on 11 September 2005, about two years before the end of the term... Political parties in Japan lists political parties in Japan. ... The Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), also known as JiyÅ« Minshutō (自由民主党, or the abbreviation Jimin-tō 自民党) is a liberal conservative political party and the largest political party in Japan, as of 2005. ... The Democratic Party of Japan ) is a liberal party in Japan. ... The New Clean Government Party (公明党, Kōmeitō) or NKP, often translated as New Komeito Party, is a political party in Japan endorsed by the Buddhist organisation Soka Gakkai. ... The Japanese Communist Party (JCP) (日本共産党), in Japanese known as Nihon Kyōsan-tō is a political party of Japan based on communism. ... The Social Democratic Party (社会民主党 Shakai Minshu-tō, often abbreviated to 社民党 Shamin-tō; also abbreviated as SDP in English) is a political party of Japan. ... } While Japans political mainstream can be described as a one and a half party system, with the LDP being the dominant force, there is room for political extremism to the left and the right. ... The prefectures of Japan are the countrys 47 sub-national jurisdictions: one metropolis (都 to), Tokyo; one circuit (道 dō), Hokkaidō; two urban prefectures (府 fu), Osaka and Kyoto; and 43 other prefectures (県 ken). ... Monetary policy pertains to the regulation, availability, and cost of credit, while fiscal policy deals with government expenditures, taxes, and debt. ... The primary responsibility for the Japanese foreign policy, as determined by the 1947 constitution, is exercised by the cabinet and subject to the overall supervision of the National Diet. ... Hi CeyCey Despite the burst of the Japanese asset price bubble in the early 1990s and the subsequent slow economic growth, Japan remains a major economic and cultural power. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ...

Elections

Tokyo prefecture held elections for the prefectural assembly on 3 July 2005. Next election will be in 2009. July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

[discuss] – [edit]
Summary of the 3 July 2005 Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly election results
Parties Votes % Seats
Liberal Democratic Party of Japan (自由民主党, Jiyū Minshutō) 48
Democratic Party of Japan (民主党, Minshutō) 35
New Komeito party (公明党, Kōmeitō) 23
Japanese Communist Party (日本共産党, Nihon Kyōsan-tō) 15.6 13
Social Democratic Party (社民党 Shamin-tō) -
Others 8
Total (turnout 43.99%) N/A 100.00 127
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