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Encyclopedia > Politics of Hong Kong
Politics and government of Hong Kong

Basic Law
Government
    Chief Executive
       Donald Tsang
    Chief Secretary for Administration
       Henry Tang
    Financial Secretary
       John Tsang
    Secretary for Justice
       Wong Yan Lung
    Executive Council
       Leung Chun Ying
    Depts and related organisations
Legislative Council
    Rita Fan
Elections
Political parties
    DAB
       Tam Yiu Chung
    Liberal Party
       James Tien
    Democratic Party
       Albert Ho
    Civic Party
       Kuan Hsin-chi
       Audrey Eu
    League of Social Democrats
       Raymond Wong Yuk Man
Judiciary
    Court of Final Appeal
Districts
District Councils
Human rights
Foreign relations
Drawn by Jerry Crimson Mann 15:47, 24 Jun 2005 (UTC). ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; see pronunciation; conventional short name Hong Kong Government, 香港政府), led by the Chief Executive is responsible for the administration of Hong... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: Xiānggǎng Tèbié Xíngzhèngqū Xíngzhèng Zhǎngguān; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dak6 bit6 hang4 zing3 keoi1... The Honourable Sir Donald Tsang Yam-Kuen[1], GBM, KBE, JP (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , born October 7, 1944) has been the Chief Executive of Hong Kong since 2005. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Secretary for Administration (Traditional Chinese: ), commonly known as Chief Secretary and abbreviated as CS, is the second highest position of Hong Kong Government. ... Henry Tang The Honourable Henry Tang Ying Yen GBS JP (Chinese 唐英年) (born 1953) is the Financial Secretary of Hong Kong. ... Financial Secretary, often abbreviated as FS, is a position of the Hong Kong Government. ... John Tsang Chun Wah (曾俊華) is the current Secretary for Commerce, Industry and Technology of Hong Kong. ... Secretary for Justice (律政司司長) is a member of the Hong Kong Government responsible for prosecutions and legal matters. ... Wong Yan Lung, SC Wong Yan Lung SC (Chinese: 黃仁龍) (1963 - ) is currently the Secretary for Justice of Hong Kong from October 20, 2005. ... The Executive Council (ExCo) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China is an organ in the Executive branch of the political structure of Hong Kong. ... Leung Chun Ying, GBS, JP, BSC is a current member of the Executive Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. ... Departments and agencies are controlled by the Hong Kong Government. ... The Legislative Council (abbreviated as LegCo; Chinese: 立法會, Pinyin: Lìfǎ Huì; formerly 立法局, Lìfǎ Jú) is the unicameral legislature of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Rita Fan Hsu Lai-tai (范徐麗泰) GBS, JP, MA, BSc (born 1945) is the President of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LEGCO) and represents a geographical constituency of Hong Kong Island. ... Elections are held in Hong Kong when certain offices in the government need to be filled. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues with the aim to participate in power, usually by participating in elections. ... The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong (DAB) (民主建港協進聯盟, formerly 民主建港聯盟, or 民建聯 in short) is the largest pro-Beijing political party in Hong Kong SAR of the PRC. Founded in 10 July 1992, the party has been headed by Ma Lik since December 2003. ... Tam Yiu Chung, GBS, JP, (Traditional Chinese: 譚耀宗, born 15 December 1949 in Hong Kong with family roots in Huiyang, Guangdong) is a current councillor from 1998 in the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. ... Liberal Party (自由黨) is a liberal conservative political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... James Tien The Honourable James Tien Pei Chun GBS JP (田北俊) (born January 8, 1947) is currently the Chairman of the Liberal Party (LP), a pro-business and pro-Beijing political party in Hong Kong, and a Member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo). ... The Democratic Party (民主黨, Hanyu: mín zhǔ dǎng, Jyutping: man zyu dong) is a pro-democracy and liberal political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Albert Ho Chun-yan 何俊仁 (born December 1, 1951) is currently the secretary general of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China and the vice-chairman of Democratic Party (Hong Kong). ... Civic Party (Traditional Chinese: ) is a pro-democracy and social democratic political party in Hong Kong. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Audrey Eu (余若薇; born September 11, 1953 - ) LLB (HKU), LLM (London), SC, JP is a member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. ... The League of Social Democrats (Chinese:社會民主連線) is a relatively radical pro-democratic political organization in Hong Kong. ... Prof. ... The Judiciary of Hong Kong is responsible for the administration of justice in Hong Kong. ... Court of Final Appeal usually refers to the last court in which one can appeal cases brought before the highest level. ... The territory of Hong Kong is divided in 18 administrative districts (Population as of 2000) Hong Kong Island Central and Western (274,400) Eastern (620,800) Southern (282,400) Wan Chai (190,300) Kowloon (New Kowloon included) Kowloon City (406,000) Kwun Tong (564,700) Sham Shui Po (372,200... The District Councils (區議會 and formerly District Boards) are district organizations in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Hong Kongs diplomatic relations and defence are the responsibility of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Other Hong Kong topics
Culture - Economy
Education - Geography - History
Hong Kong Portal

Politics of Hong Kong takes place in a framework of a political system dominated by China, an own legislature, the Chief Executive as the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government. On July 1, 1997, Hong Kong returned to Chinese control, when the sovereignty of Hong Kong was transferred to the People's Republic of China (PRC), ending more than 150 years of British colonial rule. Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the PRC with a high degree of autonomy in all matters except foreign and defense affairs. According to the Sino-British Joint Declaration (1984) and the Basic Law – Hong Kong's mini-constitution – for at least 50 years after transition Hong Kong will retain its political, economic, and judicial systems and unique way of life and continue to participate in international agreements and organisations as a dependent territory. For instance, the International Olympic Committee recognises Hong Kong as a participating dependency under the name, "Hong Kong, China", separate from the Mainland China. The culture of Hong Kong can best be described as a foundation that began with China, and then leaned West for much of the 20th century under constructive British colonialism. ... The History of Hong Kong began as a coastal island geographically located in southern China. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng ZhÇŽngguān; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dak6 bit6 hang4 zing3 keoi1... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Benign colonialism be merged into this article or section. ... Special administrative region may be: Peoples Republic of China Special administrative regions, present-day administrative divisions (as of 2006) set up by the Peoples Republic of China to administer Hong Kong (since 1997) and Macau (since 1999) Republic of China Special administrative regions, also translated as special administrative... The Sino-British Joint Declaration, formally known as the Joint Declaration of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Government of the Peoples Republic of China on the Question of Hong Kong, was signed by the Prime Ministers of the Peoples... This article is about the year. ... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... ...

Contents

Overview

In accordance with Article 31 of the Constitution of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong has Special Administrative Region status, which provides constitutional guarantees for implementing the policy of "one country, two systems". The government is economically very liberal and is rather democratic but with limited suffrage for special elections. The head of government (the Chief Executive of Hong Kong) is not elected directly but through an electoral college which is partially appointed with the rest elected in special elections with limited suffrage. The Basic Law, Hong Kong's constitutional document, was approved in March 1990 by National People's Congress of the PRC. The Constitution of the Peoples Republic of China (中华人民共和国宪法; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó XiànfÇŽ) is the highest law within the Peoples Republic of China. ... Special administrative region may be: Peoples Republic of China Special administrative regions, present-day administrative divisions (as of 2006) set up by the Peoples Republic of China to administer Hong Kong (since 1997) and Macau (since 1999) Republic of China Special administrative regions, also translated as special administrative... One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yì; guó liÇŽng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai), is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ... For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation). ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng ZhÇŽngguān; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dak6 bit6 hang4 zing3 keoi1... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal This page discusses the college of electors in Hong Kong politics. ... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest...


On the other hand, the legal system of Hong Kong is generally based on the English common law system. The current legal system will stay in force until at least 30 June 2047. This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2047 (MMXLVII) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


All citizens 18 years of age and older are eligible for the direct elections, as suffrage is universal for permanent residents living in the territory of Hong Kong for seven years. Meanwhile, eligibility for certain indirect elections limited to about 180 000 voters in twenty-eight functional constituencies (composed of business and professional sectors), and the Chief Executive is elected by an 800-member electoral college drawn mostly from the voters in the functional constituencies but also from religious organisations and municipal and central government bodies. A functional constituency, in Hong Kong politics, refers to professional and special interest groups involved in the electoral process. ... This article is about Electoral Colleges in general. ...


Government

The Chief Executive is the head of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China and the executive branch. The legislative branch is the unicameral Legislative Council. The judicial branch consists of a series of courts, of which the court of final adjudication is the Court of Final Appeal. Hong Kong is represented in the National People's Congress by a delegation which is elected by a special electoral committee. Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; see pronunciation; conventional short name Hong Kong Government, 香港政府), led by the Chief Executive is responsible for the administration of Hong... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng ZhÇŽngguān; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dak6 bit6 hang4 zing3 keoi1... Hong Kong (香港; Cantonese IPA: ; Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2; Yale: heūng góng; pinyin: Xiānggǎng; Wade-Giles: Hsiang-kang) is one of the two Special Administrative Regions of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Legislative Council (abbreviated as LegCo; Chinese: 立法會, Pinyin: LìfÇŽ Huì; formerly 立法局, LìfÇŽ Jú) is the unicameral legislature of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, is the highest court in that jurisdiction and functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be appealed. ... Court of Final Appeal usually refers to the last court in which one can appeal cases brought before the highest level. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest...


Major political issues in recent years

A poster promoting the March for Democracy

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Right of Abode

On 29 January 1999, the Court of Final Appeal, the highest judicial authority in Hong Kong interpreted several Articles of the Basic Law, in such a way that the Government estimated would allow 1.6 million Mainland China immigrants to enter Hong Kong within ten years. This caused widespread concerns among the public on the social and economical consequences. The interior page of a BDTC passport that has been stamped by the former British immigration authorities to indicate that the bearer has the right of abode in Hong Kong. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... ...


While some in the legal sector advocated that the National People's Congress (NPC) should be asked to amend the part of the Basic Law to redress the problem, the HKSAR Government decided to seek an interpretation to, rather than an amendment of, the relevant Basic Law provisions from the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress (NPCSC). The NPCSC issued an interpretation in favour of the Hong Kong Government in June 1999, thereby overturning parts of the court decision. While the full powers of NPCSC to interpret the Basic Law is provided for in the Basic Law itself, some critics argues this undermines judicial independence. The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest... Cover of Index to the Basic Law The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (中華人民共和國香港特別行政區基本法; or in short 香港基本法 or 基本法) serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... The Standing Committee of the National Peoples Congress (NPCSC; Chinese: 全国人民代表大会常务委员会, pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín DàibiÇŽo Dàhuì Chángwù WÄ›iyuánhuì) is a committee of about 150 members of the National Peoples Congress (NPC) of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), which... Judicial independence is the doctrine that decisions of the judiciary should be impartial and not subject to influence from the other branches of government or from private or political interests. ...


Basic Law Article 23

Main article: Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23

In 2003, the HKSAR Government proposed to implement Article 23 of the Basic Law by legislating against acts such as treason, subversion, secession and sedition. However, there are concerns that the legislation might infringe on human rights. Some are also worried that the legislation might introduce the mainland's concept of national security into the HKSAR via the proposed power of proscribing organisations that endanger the security of the state. General dissatisfaction with the Tung administration led to the 1 July protests in 2003. About 500,000 people participated in this protest. Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23 is the basis (parent statute) of a security law proposed by the Government of Hong Kong. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ... Subversion is an overturning or uprooting. ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Sedition is a term of law which refers to covert conduct, such as speech and organization, that is deemed by the legal authority as tending toward insurrection against the established order. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the mass protest, the Liberal Party, whose support is essential for the passage of the legislation schedule for 9 July 2003, called for a delay in passing the legislation. On 6 July, Tung Chee Hwa announced that the second reading of the proposed legislation was to be postponed after James Tien of the Liberal Party resigned from the Executive Council and would have his party members vote for a postponement. Liberal Party (自由黨) is a liberal conservative political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Tien The Honourable James Tien Pei Chun GBS JP (田北俊) (born January 8, 1947) is currently the Chairman of the Liberal Party (LP), a pro-business and pro-Beijing political party in Hong Kong, and a Member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo). ...


Universal suffrage

Towards the end of 2003, the focus of political controversy shifted to the dispute of how subsequent Chief Executives get elected. The Basic Law's Article 45 stipulates that the ultimate goal is universal suffrage; when and how to achieve that goal, however, remains open but controversial. Under the Basic Law, electoral law could be amended to allow for this as soon as 2007 (Ann.1, Sect.7). Arguments over this issue seemed to be responsible for a series of Mainland Chinese newspapers commentaries in February 2004 which stated that power over Hong Kong was only fit for "patriots." Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng ZhÇŽngguān; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dak6 bit6 hang4 zing3 keoi1... Hong Kong Basic Law Article 45 is a controversial article in the Basic Law (constitution) of Hong Kong. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal An election will be held in March 2007 to select the Chief Executive of Hong Kong. ...


The interpretation of the NPCSC to Annex I and II of the Basic Law, promulgated on April 6, 2004, made it clear that the National People's Congress' support is required over proposals to amend the electoral system under Basic Law. On April 26, 2004, the Standing Committee of National People's Congress denied the possibility of universal suffrage in 2007 (for the Chief Executive) and 2008 (for LegCo). is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The NPCSC interpretation and decision were regarded as obstacles to the democratic development of Hong Kong by the democratic camp, and were criticized for lack of consultation with Hong Kong residents. On the other hand, the pro-government camp considered them to be in compliance with the legislative intent of the Basic Law and in line with the One country, two systems principle, and hoped that this would put an end to the controversies on development of political structure in Hong Kong. One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yì; guó liǎng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai), is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China, a position guaranteed by the countrys constitution. ...

The 1 July Protests

The first 1 July protest took place in 2003, just after the World Health Organisation declared an end to the SARS epidemic and very close to the bottom of the economic depression. The headline theme was opposition to the anti-subversion legislation and general dissatisfaction with the Hong Kong Government. Fear of the loss of freedom of speech and other freedoms, as well as a general dissatisfaction against the Government, prompted a mass protest of hundreds of thousands of people on July 1, 2003. The planners originally wanted all four football courts in Victoria Park, but all courts were booked for a pro-Beijing festival and fair. The organizers originally predicted only 20,000 demonstrators would participate. The actual number ranged from 350,000 (as quoted by the police) to 700,000 (as quoted by protesters) and even 1,000,000 (quoted from a pro-Falun Gong agency), but the generally accepted figure is 500,000. Their route stretched from Victoria Park football field through Causeway and Central to the Government's Central offices. Nonetheless, the large numbers meant that people were still starting the march as late as 10PM. Hong Kong July 1 Marches (Chinese: ), is an annual mass protest organized by the Civil Human Rights Front since the transfer of the sovereignty of Hong Kong on the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Establishment Day. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings of the acronym WHO, see WHO (disambiguation) WHO flag Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization (WHO) is an agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health. ... Hong Kong Basic Law Article 23 is the basis (parent statute) of a Hong Kong Government. ... This article is about the general concept. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Falun Gong, (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; literally Practice of the Wheel of Law) also known as Falun Dafa, (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; lit. ...


In dissatisfaction with the NPC's interpretation of Basic Law that universal suffrage was impossible for Chief Executive and Legislative Council elections in 2007 and 2008 respectively, and in fear of the loss of freedom of speech fueled by the heated patriotic debate and abrupt pause of popular radio programmes allegedly suppressed by Beijing authorities, another similar protest march occurred on the same day in 2004. The peaceful march took the same route from the previous year from Victoria Park through Hennessy road and by Admiralty and Central MTR stations, and ended at the Government's Central Offices. The numbers were estimated to be 530,000 by organisers, whilst the police gave numbers around 200,000. The probable lower numbers were attributed to the fact that it was the hottest 1 July ever recorded, at 34 degrees Celsius. Another suggested reason is that a large number of people stayed up late until the early morning to watch the Euro 2004 match between Portugal and the Netherlands. There was a noticeable fall in the general anger of the crowds when compared to the 2003 march, attributed to the fact that the Hong Kong economy was showing signs of recovery, and the dissolution of Article 23. This article is about the general concept. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ...


However, there was much criticism as to the slogan for the 2004 protest by some Beijing bureaucrats and pro-Beijing political parties. The phrase "Return power to the people" was particularly inflammatory because it implied that power was taken away from the people, according to pro-Beijing parties. Some pro-democracy political leaders such as Lau Chin-shek had considered changing the phrase, but many criticized this move as it was seen to be satisfying Beijing. The organizers kept the phrase. The planners instructed the protesters to wear white, as a sign of democracy. Furthermore, unlike the previous year, the protest march started as soon as the football field venues were 80% full, causing the protest to start half hour earlier. Learning from the previous year, planning was much more smooth, allowing more of the road to be open as well as starting earlier. Most of the protesters had finished their march by 7PM, ending earlier than the previous year. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lau Chin-shek Lau Chin-shek (Chinese: 劉千石, born 12 September 1944) is the President of the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions and a Vice Chairman of the Hong Kong Christian Industrial Committee. ...


In 2005 a follow up protest was attempted. Only about 21,000 people participated in the march, significantly less than previous years. This is partially because the economy had come back since 2003, and more importantly, the generally unpopular Tung Chee-Hwa had resigned as Chief Executive earlier that year, with the more popular former Chief Secretary Donald Tsang now taking over. That led some people to claim that some Hong Kong protesters from the first two marches care more about their economic livelihood than political reform, but in fact most were asking for the removal of Tung, which had been achieved. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tung Chee-hwa (Traditional Chinese: 董建華 Simplified Chinese: 董建华 Pinyin: Dǒng Jiànhuá) (born July 7, 1937, or the 29th day of the fifth month in the Chinese calendar) is the first Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People... The Honourable Sir Donald Tsang Yam-Kuen[1], GBM, KBE, JP (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , born October 7, 1944) has been the Chief Executive of Hong Kong since 2005. ...


Resignation of Tung Chee-hwa and interpretation of Basic Law

On March 12, 2005, the Chief Executive, Tung Chee-hwa, resigned. Tung's position is now filled by Donald Tsang, formerly the Chief Secretary for Administration — a popular bow tie-wearing career civil servant who was educated at Harvard and received a knighthood for his service during British colonial rule. Immediately after Tung's resignation, Tsang assumed the role of acting Chief Executive, which he stepped down from prior to putting himself forward as a candidate for the post of Chief Executive. Tsang was subsequently chosen to be the next Chief Executive, and his term will expire in 2007. Tung Chee Hwa, the first Chief Executive of Hong Kong, announced the submission of his resignation to the Central Peoples Government (CPG) of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) on March 10, 2005. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Honourable Sir Donald Tsang Yam-Kuen[1], GBM, KBE, JP (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , born October 7, 1944) has been the Chief Executive of Hong Kong since 2005. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Secretary for Administration (Traditional Chinese: ), commonly known as Chief Secretary and abbreviated as CS, is the second highest position of Hong Kong Government. ... The Hong Kong Chief Executive election of 2005 is an election to fill the vacancy of the territorys top office. ...


After Tung's resignation, there was dispute over the length of the term of the Chief Executive. To most local legal professionals, the length is obviously five years, under whatever circumstances. It should also be noted that the wording of the Basic Law on the term of the Chief Executive is substantially different from the articles in the PRC constitution concerning the length of term of the president, premier, etc. Nonetheless, legal experts from the mainland said it is a convention a successor will only serve the remainder of the term if the position is vacant because the predecessor resigned. The Standing Committee of the National People's Congress exercise its right to interpret the Basic Law, and affirm that the successor will only serve the remainder of the term. Many in Hong Kong saw this as an adverse impact on the rule of law in the territory, as the Central People's Government interpret the Basic Law to serve its need, that is, a two-year probation for Tsang, instead of a five-year term. The Standing Committee of the National Peoples Congress (NPCSC; Chinese: 全国人民代表大会常务委员会, pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín DàibiÇŽo Dàhuì Chángwù WÄ›iyuánhuì) is a committee of about 150 members of the National Peoples Congress (NPC) of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), which... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest...


Political Reform Package

On December 4, 2005, people in Hong Kong demonstrated against Donald Tsang's proposed reform package, before a vote on December 21. Turnout estimates ranged from 63,000 to 250,000. is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Protesters passing Yee Wo Street in Causeway Bay. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The march has sent a strong message to hesitant pro-democracy legislators to follow public opinion. The pro-government camp claims to have collected 700,000 signatures on a petition backing Mr. Tsang's reform package. This number, however, is widely seen as too small to influence pro-democracy lawmakers. The Reform Package debate has seen the return of key political figure and former Chief Secretary Anson Chan, raising speculations of a possible run up for the 2007 Chief Executive election, though she dismissed having a personal interest in standing for the next election. Anson Chan Anson Chan (Fang On Sang) GBM GCMG CBE JP (Chinese: ) (born January 17, 1940) was head of Hong Kongs civil service before and after the territorys handover to the Peoples Republic of China from British colonial rule. ...


In an attempt to win last minute votes from moderate pro-democracy lawmakers, the government amended its reform package on December 19 by proposing a gradual cut in district councils appointed members. Their number would be reduced from 102 to 68 by 2008. It would then be decided in 2011 whether to scrap the remaining seats in 2012 or in 2016. The amendment has been seen as a reluctant response by Donald Tsang to give satisfaction to the democratic demands of the December 4 demonstrations. The move has been qualified "Too little, too late" by pan-democrates in general. is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On December 21, 2005, the reform political reform package was vetoed by the pro-democracy lawmakers. Chief Secretary Rafael Hui openly criticised pro-democracy Martin Lee and Bishop Zen for blocking the proposed changes. is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rafael Hui Si Yan, GBS, JP (Chinese: 許仕仁, born 1948) is Chief Secretary for Administration of Hong Kong and a former career civil servant. ... For other persons named Martin Lee, see Martin Lee (disambiguation). ... Joseph Zen Joseph Zen Ze-kiun (Traditional Chinese: 陳日君) (born January 13, 1932) is the bishop of Hong Kong. ...


Nationality and citizenship

Chinese nationality

Main article: HKSAR passport

Before and after the handover, the PRC recognises the ethnic Chinese people in Hong Kong as its citizens. The PRC issues Home Return Permits for them to enter the mainland China. Flag of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) The Nationality Law of the Peoples Republic of China (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó guójí fÇŽ) regulates citizenship in the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... The Cover of HKSAR ePassport Inside of the HKSAR ePassport Personal Data Page Under Fluorescent Light Visa Pages Back Cover with Contactless Chip The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Passport (Traditional Chinese: ) is the official international travel document issued to Chinese citizen who have the right of abode in the... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Nationality Law of the Peoples Republic of China This law is applicable to the acquisition, loss and restoration of nationality of the Peoples Republic of China. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Most residents of Hong Kong are PRC citizens, by virtue of the PRC Memorandum to the Sino-British Joint Declaration. Hong Kong issues the HKSAR passport through its Immigration Department to all PRC citizens who are permanent residents of Hong Kong (permanent residency implies that they have the right of abode in Hong Kong) . Nationality Law of the Peoples Republic of China This law is applicable to the acquisition, loss and restoration of nationality of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Sino-British Joint Declaration, formally known as the Joint Declaration of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Government of the Peoples Republic of China on the Question of Hong Kong, was signed by the Prime Ministers of the Peoples... The right of abode refers to an individuals freedom from immigration control in a particular country. ...


The HKSAR passport is not the same as the ordinary PRC passport (which is issued to residents of mainland China), and only permanent residents of Hong Kong who are PRC citizens are eligible to apply. To acquire the status of permanent resident one has to have "ordinarily resided" in Hong Kong for a period of seven years and adopted Hong Kong as their permanent home. Therefore, citizenships rights enjoyed by residents of mainland China and residents Hong Kong are differentiated even though both hold the same citizenship. ... ...


Interestingly, new immigrants from mainland China (still posses the Chinese Citizenship) to Hong Kong are denied from getting PRC passport from the mainland authorities, and are not eligible to apply for an HKSAR passport. They usually hold the Document of Identity (DI) as the travel document, until the permanent resident status is obtained after seven years of residence. This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, etc. ...


Naturalisation as a PRC Citizen is common among ethnic Chinese people in Hong Kong who are not PRC Citizens. Some who have surrendered their PRC citizenship, usually those who have emigrated to foreign countries and have retained the permanent resident status, can apply for PRC citizenship at the Immigration Department, though they must renounce their original nationality in order to acquire the PRC citizenship.-1... Nationality Law of the Peoples Republic of China This law is applicable to the acquisition, loss and restoration of nationality of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Naturalisation of persons of non-Chinese ethnicity are rare because China does not allow dual citizenship and becoming a Chinese citizen requires the renouncement of other passports. A notable example is Michael Rowse, a permanent resident of Hong Kong and the current Director-General of Investment Promotion of Hong Kong Government, naturalised and became a PRC citizen, for the offices of secretaries of the policy bureaux are only open to PRC citizens. Mr Michael Rowse was briefly Commissioner for Tourism and is now the Director-General of Investment Promotion in Hong Kong. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: ; see pronunciation; conventional short name Hong Kong Government, 香港政府), led by the Chief Executive is responsible for the administration of Hong...


British nationality

Hong Kong residents who were born in Hong Kong in the colonial era (about 3.5 million) could acquire the British Dependent Territories citizenship (BDTC). HK residents who were not born in Hong Kong could also naturalize as a BDTC before the handover. To allow them to retain the status of British national while preventing a possible flood of immigrants from Hong Kong, the United Kingdom created a new nationality status, British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) that Hong Kong British Dependent Territories citizens could apply for. Holders of the BN(O) passports, however, have no right of abode in the UK. See British nationality law and Hong Kong for details. British nationality law as it pertains to Hong Kong has been a unique situation ever since it was created a British colony in 1842. ... This article concerns matters of British nationality law in relation to Hong Kong. ... British nationality law as it pertains to Hong Kong has been a unique situation ever since it was created a British colony in 1842. ...


British National (Overseas) status was given effect by the Hong Kong (British Nationality) Order 1986. Article 4(1) of the Order provided that on and after 1 July 1987, there would be a new form of British nationality, the holders of which would be known as British Nationals (Overseas). Article 4(2) of the Order provided that adults and minors who had a connection to Hong Kong were entitled to make an application to become British Nationals (Overseas) by registration. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...


Becoming a British National (Overseas) was therefore not an automatic or involuntary process and indeed many eligible people who had the requisite connection with Hong Kong never applied to become British Nationals (Overseas). Acquisition of the new status had to be voluntary and therefore a conscious act. To make it involuntary or automatic would have been contrary to the assurances given to the Chinese government which led to the words "eligible to" being used in paragraph (a) of the United Kingdom Memorandum to the Sino-British Joint Declaration. The deadline for applications passed in 1997. Any person who failed to register as a British Nationals (Overseas) by 1 July 1997 and were eligible to become PRC citizens became solely PRC citizens on 1 July 1997. However, any person who would be rendered stateless by failure to register as a British Nationals (Overseas) automatically became a British Overseas citizen under article 6(1) of the Hong Kong (British Nationality) Order 1986. The Sino-British Joint Declaration, formally known as the Joint Declaration of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Government of the Peoples Republic of China on the Question of Hong Kong, was signed by the Prime Ministers of the Peoples... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


After the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, people urged the British Government to grant full British citizenship to all Hong Kong BDTCs — but this request was never accepted. However, it was considered necessary to devise a British Nationality Selection Scheme to enable some of the population to obtain British citizenship. The United Kingdom made provision to grant citizenship to 50,000 families whose presence was important to the future of Hong Kong under the British Nationality Act (Hong Kong) 1990. The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, commonly referred to as the Tiananmen Square Massacre,[1] were a series of demonstrations led by students, intellectuals, and labor activists in the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) between April 15 and June 4, 1989. ... Section 1(1) of the British Nationality (Hong Kong) Act 1990 gave the Home Secretary the power to register as British citizens up to 50,000 persons (heads of families) recommended to him by the Governor of Hong Kong. ...


After reunification, all PRC citizens with the right of abode in Hong Kong (holding Hong Kong permanent identity cards) are eligible to apply for the HKSAR passport issued by the Hong Kong Immigration Department. As the number of visa-free-visit destinations of the HKSAR passport surprassed the BN(O) passport and the application fee for the former is lower, the HKSAR passport is becoming more popular among residents of Hong Kong. However many Hong Kong people who are eligible for both HKSAR and BN(O) passports have applied for both passports, as they are both PRC citizen and British National (Overseas). Nationality Law of the Peoples Republic of China This law is applicable to the acquisition, loss and restoration of nationality of the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article concerns matters of British nationality law in relation to Hong Kong. ...


Hong Kong residents who were not born in Hong Kong (and had not naturalised as a BDTC) could only apply for the Certificate of identity (CI) from the colonial government as travel document. They are not issued (by neither the British nor Chinese authorities) after handover. Former CI holders holding PRC Citizenship (e.g. born in mainland China or Macau) and are permanent residents of Hong Kong are now eligible for the HKSAR passports, making the HKSAR passports more popular. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Recent changes to India's Citizenship Act, 1955 (see Indian nationality law) will also allow some children of Indian origin, born in Hong Kong after 7 January 2004, who have a solely BN(O) parent to automatically acquire British Overseas citizenship at birth under the provisions for reducing statelessness in article 6(2) or 6(3) of the Hong Kong (British Nationality) Order 1986. If they have acquired no other nationality after birth, they will be entitled to subsequently register for full British citizenship with right of abode in the UK. Indian citizenship/nationality law: The Constitution of India provides for a single citizenship for the entire country. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also: British nationality law and Hong Kong, nationality, citizenship British nationality law as it pertains to Hong Kong has been a unique situation ever since it was created a British colony in 1842. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ...


Political parties and elections

Main article: Hong Kong legislative election, 2004
[discuss] – [edit]
Overall Summary of the 12 September 2004 Legislative Council of Hong Kong election results
Parties Votes % Geographical
constituencies
Functional
constituencies
Total seats
Pro-Democracy Democratic Party 423,631 23.74 7 2 9
Article 45 Concern Group 165,008 9.25 3 1 4
Hong Kong Association for Democracy and People's Livelihood 74,671 4.18 1 1
Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions 89,185 5.00 1 1
Neighbourhood and Workers Service Centre 59,033 3.31 1 1
The Frontier 73,844 4.14 1 1
Pro democracy individuals and others 115,181 6.45 4 4 8
Pro-Government Democratic Alliance for Betterment of Hong Kong 402,420 22.55 8 4 12
Liberal Party 118,997 6.67 2 8 10
The Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions 52,564 2.95 1 1
Pro-government individual and others 84,346 4.76 1 11 12
Non-partisan Individuals and others 125,526 7.03
Total (turnout 55.6) 1,784,406 100.0 30 30 60
Source turnout: Xinhua. 11 candidates have been elected unopposed in 11 functional constituencies to the Legislative Council.

(Total votes added up by this reference) For the joint list of pro-democrats in NT East, as one seat get 50000 votes, compare the remaining votes, Cheng and Lau got 50000 votes each, and Tong got 48833 vote, getting the last seat. A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues with the aim to participate in power, usually by participating in elections. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... Elections are held in Hong Kong when certain offices in the government need to be filled. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The 2004 Hong Kong legislative election for members of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo) was held on September 12, 2004. ... The Legislative Council (abbreviated as LegCo; Chinese: 立法會, Pinyin: LìfÇŽ Huì; formerly 立法局, LìfÇŽ Jú) is the unicameral legislature of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Democratic Party (民主黨, Hanyu: mín zhÇ” dÇŽng, Jyutping: man zyu dong) is a pro-democracy and liberal political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Civic Party (Traditional Chinese: ) is a pro-democracy and social democratic political party in Hong Kong. ... The Hong Kong Association for Democracy and Peoples Livelihood (ADPL) (香港民主民生協進會/民協) is a pro-democracy political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions (HKCTU) (香港職工會聯盟) is a pro-democracy labour and political group in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Frontier (前綫) is a pro-democracy political group in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Logo The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB) (民主建港聯盟, 民建聯) is the largest pro-government political party in Hong Kong SAR of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Liberal Party (自由黨) is a liberal conservative political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions (HKFTU) (香港工會聯合會 / 工聯會) is a pro-Beijing labour and political group in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


The four main political parties are as follows. Each holds a significant portion of LegCo. Twelve members are registered as affiliated with the DAB, ten with the Liberal Party, nine with the Democratic Party and six with the Civic Party. There are also many unofficial party members: politicians who are members of political parties but have not registered such status in their election applications. There are two major blocs: the democratic camp and the pro-government camp.

Others include: Civic Party (Traditional Chinese: ) is a pro-democracy and social democratic political party in Hong Kong. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong (DAB) (民主建港協進聯盟, formerly 民主建港聯盟, or 民建聯 in short) is the largest pro-Beijing political party in Hong Kong SAR of the PRC. Founded in 10 July 1992, the party has been headed by Ma Lik since December 2003. ... Ma Lik (馬力) GBS JP is currently the Chairman of the Democratic Alliance for Betterment of Hong Kong (DAB), a pro-Beijing political party in Hong Kong. ... The Democratic Party (民主黨, Hanyu: mín zhǔ dǎng, Jyutping: man zyu dong) is a pro-democracy and liberal political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Albert Ho Chun-yan 何俊仁 (born December 1, 1951) is currently the secretary general of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China and the vice-chairman of Democratic Party (Hong Kong). ... Liberal Party (自由黨) is a liberal conservative political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... James Tien The Honourable James Tien Pei Chun GBS JP (田北俊) (born January 8, 1947) is currently the Chairman of the Liberal Party (LP), a pro-business and pro-Beijing political party in Hong Kong, and a Member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo). ...

The Hong Kong Association for Democracy and Peoples Livelihood (ADPL) (香港民主民生協進會/民協) is a pro-democracy political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Honourable Frederick Fung Kin Kee (馮檢基) (born March 17, 1953) is the chairman of the Hong Kong Association for Democracy and Peoples Livelihood (ADPL), a pro-democracy political party in Hong Kong. ... Citizens Party (民權黨) is a small pro-democracy Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Frontier (前綫) is a pro-democracy political group in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Honourable Emily Lau Wai-hing JP (劉慧卿) (born January 21, 1952) is currently the convenor of the The Frontier, a pro-democracy political party in Hong Kong. ... The Hong Kong Progressive Alliance (HKPA) (香港協進聯盟/港進聯) was a political party in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Honourable Ambrose LAU Hon-chuen GBSis an idiot. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hong Konger Front Hong Konger Front (我是香港人連線) is an alliance composed of pro-independence websites in Hong Kong. ... The League of Social Democrats (Chinese:社會民主連線) is a relatively radical pro-democratic political organization in Hong Kong. ... Prof. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Political pressure groups and leaders

The Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions (HKCTU) (香港職工會聯盟) is a pro-democracy labour and political group in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Hong Kong Federation of Students (香港專上學生聯會) is the biggest students organization in Hong Kong. ... International Action Logo International Action is a small, non-violent, political group in Hong Kong campaigning a range of issues including social justice, human rights and democracy. ... The Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions (HKFTU) (香港工會聯合會 / 工聯會) is a pro-Beijing labour and political group in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China (the Alliance) (香港市民支援愛國民主運動聯合會 or 支聯會) is a pro-democratic organization that was established on May 21, 1989 with the purpose of supporting patriotic democratic movements in China. ... Szeto Wah 司徒華 (born February 28, 1931), is currently the chairman of The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China (香港市民支援愛國民主運動聯合會), was a member of the Legislative Council from 1985... Anson Chan Anson Chan (Fang On Sang) GBM GCMG CBE JP (Chinese: ) (born January 17, 1940) was head of Hong Kongs civil service before and after the territorys handover to the Peoples Republic of China from British colonial rule. ...

See also

Hong Kong Portal

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... State power within the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is divided among three bodies: the Party, the State, and the Army. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Government of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The “Three Anti Campaign” and “Five Anti Campaign” The suppression of reactionaries and the land reform mainly affected the countryside, while the subsequent “Three Anti Campaign” and “Five Anti Campaign” (also called the Three-striking campaign and Five-striking campaign) could be regarded as the corresponding genocide in cities. ... The flag of the HKSAR Flag ratio: 2:3 The HKSAR and the PRC flags brandishing at the patio of the Legislative Council. ... Hong Kongs diplomatic relations and defence are the responsibility of the Peoples Republic of China. ... One country, two systems (Simplified Chinese: 一国两制; Traditional Chinese: 一國兩制; pinyin: yì; guó liǎng zhì; Jyutping: jat1 gwok3 loeng5 zai3; Yale: yāt gwok leúhng jai), is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the unification of China. ... The District Councils (區議會 and formerly District Boards) are district organizations in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). ...

References

External links

  • HKSAR Government web site
  • Executive Council
  • Legislative Council
  • Olympic Watch (Committee for the 2008 Olympic Games in a Free and Democratic Country) on the status of Hong Kong
  • Sight & Sound of a recent protest march

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hong Kong (1262 words)
The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, shortened to Hong Kong (香港, pinyin: xiang1 gang3, Cantonese: heung1 gong2, meaning Fragrant Harbour), is a special administrative region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China, consisting of several islands in the South China Sea, and a peninsula.
The name "Hong Kong" is derived from Hong Kong Island in the South China Sea, at the mouth of the Xi Jiang or Pearl River of southern China.
Hong Kong is by population the fourth largest metropolitan area of the PRC (see List of cities in China).
The Globalist | Global Politics -- Hong Kong — A Failure To Celebrate? (830 words)
The final lesson is this: While Hong Kong’s protests have drawn residents of all ages, the power and presence of local youth has been unmistakable.
Hong Kong was long a city of transients — primarily refugees from the Communist revolution in 1949 — and as such offered no one any strong sense of identity.
This much is certain, however: If Hong Kong’s notably peaceful protesters prove as loyal to their cause as they are to their tiny — but affluent — homeland, they stand a better chance of advancing their democratic freedoms now than they did before they began voicing their concerns in Hong Kong's streets.
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