FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Politics of Alberta
Alberta's first Legislature, Edmonton, 1906
Alberta's first Legislature, Edmonton, 1906

The politics of Alberta are centred on a provincial government resembling that of the other Canadian provinces. The capital of the province is Edmonton, where reside the premier, legislature, lieutenant-governor and cabinet. The unicameral legislature—the Legislative Assembly of Alberta—has 83 members. Government is conducted after the Westminster model. The province' revenue, although including grants from the federal government, is chiefly derived from management of the provincial resources. Alberta has a system of municipal government similar to that of the other provinces. The most significant exception is that Alberta is the only province in Canada without a provincial sales tax (see also Sales taxes in Canada). Opening of Albertas first Legislature, Edmonton, March 15, 1906 Credit: Cassel M. Tait/Library and Archives Canada/PA-029112 Retrieved from: http://www. ... Opening of Albertas first Legislature, Edmonton, March 15, 1906 Credit: Cassel M. Tait/Library and Archives Canada/PA-029112 Retrieved from: http://www. ... Motto: Fortis et liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English (see below) Flower   Wild rose Tree Lodgepole Pine Bird Great Horned Owl Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total... Map of Canada As shown by the map to the left, the North American nation of Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, together with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farmland on the prairies. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... The Legislative Assembly of Alberta meets in the provincial capital, Edmonton. ... The Houses of Parliament in London The Westminster system is a democratic parliamentary system of government modeled after that of the United Kingdom system, as used in the Palace of Westminster, the location of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... A sales tax is a state or locality imposed percentage tax on the selling or renting of certain property or services. ... In Canada there are three types of sales taxes: provincial sales taxes, the federal GST and the HST in Atlantic Canada. ...


Albertan politics have typically been characterized as substantially more right-wing than those of any other Canadian province, granting it the nickname "Texas of Canada" or "Texas North". The provincial government has been formed by a series of right-wing parties for decades, beginning in 1935 with Social Credit and continuing since 1971 with the Progressive Conservatives. The previous premier of Alberta was Ralph Klein, who, despite making many controversial statements and having had problems with alcohol, remained the leader of the Progressive Conservative party and thus the province, although only 55% of delegates from his party signified their approval of his leadership on the spring of 2006, pushing him into early retirement.[1] Edmonton is the exception as residents have historically voted for left of centre parties, such as the Liberal Party of Alberta and Alberta New Democrats. This can be seen in the 2004 provincial election.[2] In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The Social Credit Party of Alberta is a provincial political party in Alberta, Canada, that was founded on the social credit monetary policy and conservative Christian social values. ... The Alberta Progressive Conservative Association is a provincial right-of-centre party in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... Ralph Phillip Klein MLA (born November 1, 1942), leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives, is the current premier of the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Alberta Liberal Party is a political party in Alberta, Canada. ... The Alberta New Democrats or Alberta NDP is a social democratic political party in Canada that was founded as the Alberta section of the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation. ... Alberta riding map showing the winning parties and their vote percentage in each won riding. ...


Alberta's political stability has led to a series of political dynasties. In this, it is important to note that Alberta is a first-past-the-post system, so even though a party may have a majority of the seats in the Legislature, it does not necessarily mean that the government formed matches the wishes of a majority of the population. For example, in the 2004 election, the Progressive Conservative party won 61 of 83 seats (73%) while only obtaining 47.07% of the popular vote, leading for many of the opposition parties to include electoral reform in their policies.[3][4] Compare this with proportional representation, which is one of the alternatives suggested to combat disenfranchisement of people who vote for a non-winning candidate. In its history, Alberta has seen only four parties form governments, none of which has returned to power after a single incumbent defeat: The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ... Electoral reform projects seek to change the way that public desires are reflected in elections through electoral systems. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is an electoral system delivering a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... Disenfranchising refers to the removal of the ability to vote from a person or group of people. ...

1905-1921 Alberta Liberal Party
1921-1935 United Farmers of Alberta
1935-1971 Social Credit Party of Alberta
1971-present Alberta Progressive Conservatives

Most of the 26 Albertan general elections held as of 2006 have resulted in overwhelming majorities for the governing party, a trend unseen in any other province in Canada. No minority government has ever been elected in Alberta, nor has any minority ever been brought about due to by-elections and/or floor crossings. The Alberta Liberal Party is a political party in Alberta, Canada. ... The United Farmers of Alberta was founded in 1909 as a lobby organization representing the interests of farmers. ... The Social Credit Party of Alberta is a provincial political party in Alberta, Canada, that was founded on the social credit monetary policy and conservative Christian social values. ... The Alberta Progressive Conservative Association is a provincial right-of-centre party in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed when no political party has won a majority of seats in the parliament, typically by the party that does have a plurality. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines, especially where this is considered unusual or controversial. ...


Alberta was the heartland of the former Reform Party of Canada and its successor, the Canadian Alliance. These parties were the second-largest political parties in the federal Parliament from 1997 to 2003, and the furthest to the political right. The Canadian Alliance merged with the Progressive Conservative Party to form today's Conservative Party of Canada, which is led by the Ontario-born Stephen Harper who moved to Alberta in the 1980s. The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-leaning conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (de facto) Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Both the provincial Progressive Conservatives and the Reform/Alliance parties reflect Alberta's more socially conservative nature when compared to other provinces. Politicians elected by Albertans tend to oppose social policies such as same-sex marriage and gun control. According to a 2001 poll by Leger Marketing, 61.8% of Albertans polled are in favour of the death penalty compared to 52.9% of Canadians[5], although death penalty has been abolished throughout Canada since 1976. The outgoing Premier of Alberta, Ralph Klein, has even attempted to establish relations with politicians in the US, including sending a letter of support to US President George W. Bush signifying his approval for the Iraq war.[6] Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Categories: Canada-related stubs | Alberta premiers ... Ralph Phillip Klein MLA (born November 1, 1942), leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives, is the current premier of the Canadian province of Alberta. ...


Some Albertans continue to resent the imposition in the 1980s of the National Energy Program (NEP) by the Liberal federal government of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. It was considered to be an intrusion by the federal government in an area of provincial responsibility that led some Albertans to consider separation of the province from Canada. There have been occasional surges in interest since then in the idea of seceding from Canada, but this movement is generally considered to be on the political fringe. The NEP was ended when the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, led by Brian Mulroney, formed the federal government following the 1984 federal election. The National Energy Program (NEP) was an energy policy of the Government of Canada. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned at the centre of the political spectrum, combining a progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the head of the Government of Canada. ... Trudeau redirects here. ... Alberta separatism is a movement that advances the concept of the province of Alberta seceding from Canada. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ...


Albertans are the lowest-taxed people in Canada, mostly because of the province's considerable oil and gas income. It is also the only province in Canada where there is no Provincial Sales Tax, although the three Canadian territories also do not have a provincial sales tax.[7] Alberta is one of two provinces that consistently do not receive equalization payments from the federal government (the other being Ontario). In fact, Alberta is the largest net contributor to the program, and the payments are made to poorer provinces to ensure that all provinces are able to provide similar levels of public services. This is largely due to the wealth of the province, which is often attributed to the abundance of natural resources, but could also be linked ot the province's friendly business climate. Alberta is also the only province in Canada that has eliminated its provincial debt.[8] Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Ignacy Łukasiewicz - inventor of the refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... Natural gas is a gaseous fossil fuel consisting primarily of methane. ... Equalization payments are cash payments made in some federal systems of government from the federal government to state or provincial governments with the objective of offsetting differences in available revenue or in the cost of providing services. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (de facto) Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24...


See also

This is a list of the premier of the province of Alberta, Canada, since its creation in 1905. ... Alberta is a province of Canada. ...

References

  1. ^ "Klein receives goodbye hugs, pancakes" by the Canadian Press via Canada.com, July 24, 2006, retrieved July 24, 2006
  2. ^ Alberta Elections (2004)
  3. ^ CTV article - Alberta Elections 2004
  4. ^ Alberta Greens - 2004 Elections
  5. ^ Larger Marketing - 2001 poll
  6. ^ CBC article - Ralph Klein letter to George W. Bush
  7. ^ Taxation - provincial sales tax
  8. ^ Government of Alberta - Elimination of provincial debt


The Canadian Press (CP) is a Canadian news agency established in 1917 as a vehicle to permit Canadian newspapers of the day to exchange their news and information. ...

Politics of Alberta
v  d  e
Lieutenant-Governor: Norman Kwong | Former lieutenant-governors
Premier: Ed Stelmach | Former premiers
Opposition Leader: Kevin Taft | Former Opposition Leaders
Executive Council (Cabinet)
Legislature: Current members | Former legislatures | Current electoral divisions
Speaker of the Assembly: Ken Kowalski
Political parties: Progressive Conservatives | Liberals | New Democrats | Alliance
Alberta Party | Communists | Greens | Separation | Social Credit
Elections: 2004 general election | Electoral districts
Current issues: Equalization payments | Prosperity Bonus | Same-sex marriage | Separatism
Other provinces and territories: BCAB • SK • MB • ONQC • NB • NS • PEI • NL • YU • NT • NU

  Results from FactBites:
 
Politics of Alberta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (918 words)
In this, it is important to note that Alberta is a first-past-the-post system, so even though a party may have a majority of the seats in the Legislature, it does not necessarily mean that the government formed matches the wishes of a majority of the population.
Alberta was the heartland of the former Reform Party of Canada and its successor, the Canadian Alliance.
These parties were the second-largest political parties in the federal Parliament from 1997 to 2003, and the furthest to the political right.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m