FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pole weapon
A reenactor troupe armed with a variety of polearm known as a halberd.

A pole weapon or polearm is a close combat weapon in which the main fighting part of the weapon is placed on the end of a long shaft, typically of wood, thereby extending the user's effective range. Spears, glaives, pollaxes and bardiches are all varieties of polearm. The idea of attaching a weapon onto a long shaft is an old one indeed, as the first spears date back to the Stone Age. The purpose of using pole weapons is either to extend reach or to increase angular momentum—and thus striking power—when the weapon is swung. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Trunks A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is a solid material derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ... Hunting spear and knife, from Mesa Verde National Park. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The pollaxe is a type of European polearm which was very popular for foot combat during medieval times. ... Classic Example This is a page about the long poleaxe. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... This gyroscope remains upright while spinning due to its angular momentum. ...

Contents

History

Pole weapons are relatively simple to make, and they were fairly easy for most people to use effectively as they were often derived from hunting or agricultural tools. For example, the Chinese Monk's Spade, with its shovel-like end, served two purposes for the monks who used it: if they came upon a corpse on the road, they could properly bury it with Buddhist rites; and the large implement could serve as a weapon for self-defence against bandits. “Hunter” redirects here. ... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool or device is a piece of equipment which typically provides a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task, or provides an ability that is not naturally available to the user of a tool. ... Monk Spade A monks spade (Chinese: 月牙鏟; pinyin: yuèyáchǎn; literally Moon-Tooth Spade) is a Chinese pole weapon consisting of a long pole with a flat spade-like blade on one end and a smaller crescent shaped blade on the other. ... A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ...


Massed men carrying pole weapons with pointed tips (spears, pikes, etc.) were recognized fairly early in the history of organized warfare as effective military units. On defense the men holding the polearms were hard to reach; on the attack, as in the Greek phalanx, they were devastating to those units which could not get out of the way. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


With the advent of armored fighters, especially cavalry, pole weapons frequently combined the spearpoint (for thrusting) with an axe or hammerhead for a swinging strike which could pierce or break armor. Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... Axe For other uses, see Axe (disambiguation). ... A claw hammer For other uses, see Hammer (disambiguation). ...


Modern use

Pole weapons have largely been superseded by firearms. However, the bayonet attachment for a modern assault rifle, when attached, especially sword bayonet or knife bayonet, can still be regarded as a form of pole weapon. Today, pole weapons remain a common sight in practically every school of martial arts that studies weapons. A Glock 22 hand-held firearm with internal laser sight and mounted flashlight, surrounded by hollowpoint ammunition. ... The US Marine Corps OKC-3S Bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon. ... The AK-47 is the worlds most common assault rifle. ... The sword bayonet is any long, knife-bladed bayonet designed for mounting on a musket or rifle. ... A knife bayonet is a knife or short sword which can be used both as a bayonet or fighting or utility knife. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...


Varieties of pole weapon

Fauchard

A fauchard is a type of polearm which was used in medieval Europe from the 11th through the 14th centuries. The design consisted of a curved blade put atop a 6–7 foot long pole. The blade bore a moderate to strong curve along its length, however unlike a glaive the cutting edge was only on the concave side. This made the fauchard blade resemble that of a sickle or a scythe. This was not a very efficient design for the purposes of war, and was eventually modified to have one or more lance points attached to the back or top of the blade. This weapon is called a fauchard-fork, but is very often erroneously referred to as a guisarme or bill-guisarme since it superficially appears to have a "hook". A fauchard is a type of polearm which was used in mediaeval Europe for the 11th through the 14th centuries. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A lens. ... Using a sickle A sickle is a curved, hand-held agricultural tool typically used for harvesting grain crops before the advent of modern harvesting machinery. ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... A guisarme (sometimes gisarme or bisarme) is a now antiquated pole weapon used in Europe primarily between 1000-1400. ... Pole weapons and Mortuary Swords in the Great Hall of Edinburgh Castle. ...


Glaive

A glaive is a polearm consisting of a single-edged blade on the end of a pole. It is similar to the Japanese naginata. However, instead of having a tang like a sword or naginata, the blade is affixed in a socket-shaft configuration similar to an axe head. Typically, the blade was around 18 inches (55 cm) long, on the end of a pole 6 or 7 feet (180–210 cm) long. Occasionally glaive blades were created with a small hook on the reverse side to better catch riders. Such blades are called glaive-guisarmes. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ... A samurai wielding a naginata Naginata (なぎなた, 長刀 or 薙刀) is a pole weapon that was traditionally used in Japan by members of the samurai class. ... The tang of a sword or fixed-blade knife is that part of the blade extending into and usually through the grip that is fastened to it. ...


Guan dao

A guan dao or kwan dao is a type of Chinese pole weapon that is currently used in some forms of Chinese martial arts (wushu). In Chinese it is properly called a Yanyue dao (偃月刀) which translates as reclining moon blade). Alternatively the guan dao is also known as "Chun Choi Dai Dao" or Spring Autumn Great Knife. It is an ornate version of a more plain Chinese weapon known as a pudao (long-handled sabre) or horsecutter and consists of a heavy blade mounted atop a 5–6 foot long wooden or metal pole with a pointed metal counter weight used to balance the heavy blade and for striking on the opposite end. The blade is very deep and curved on its face; this resembles a China sabre or the Japanese naginata and bisento, or the European glaive and voulge. Often the edge will taper to a point on the top for thrusting. The reverse has a spike used for hooking and dismounting victims. In addition there are sometimes irregular serrations that lead the back edge of the blade to the spike. Usually a red sash or tassel is attached at the joint of the pole and blade. Variations include having rings along the length of the straight back edge as found in the nine-ring guan dao, having the tip curl into a rounded spiral as in the elephant guan dao, or featuring a more ornate design as exemplified by the dragon head guan dao. A guan dao or kwan dao is a type of Chinese pole weapon that is currently used in some forms of Chinese martial arts (wushu). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... WÇ”shù, in Simplified Chinese Wushu (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: wÇ”shù  ; Cantonese: mou5söt6) literally means martial art. It is a more precise term than the widely used term kung fu, which can mean either martial art or skill: a craftsperson or artisan could be said to have... The Chinese pudao (撲刀) was originally an infantry weapon which is now used in martial arts. ... Chinese Saber (wushu variant used for ceremonial purposes only) Dao (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tao1) is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabers), often called broadswords in English because some varieties have wide blades. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Han Tu: The Chinese dragon is a mythical Chinese creature that also appears in other East Asian cultures, and is also sometimes called the Oriental (or Eastern) dragon. ...


Guisarme

A guisarme (sometimes gisarme or bisarme) was a pole weapon used in Europe primarily between 10001400. It was used primarily to dismount knights and horsemen. Like most polearms it was developed by peasants by combining hand tools with long poles: in this case by putting a pruning hook onto a spear shaft. While hooks are fine for dismounting horsemen from mounts, they lack the stopping power of a spear especially when dealing with static opponents. While early designs were simply a hook on the end of a long pole, later designs implemented a small reverse spike on the back of the blade. Eventually weapon makers incorporated the usefulness of the hook in a variety of different polearms and guisarme became a catch-all for any weapon that included a hook on the blade. A guisarme (sometimes gisarme or bisarme) is a now antiquated pole weapon used in Europe primarily between 1000-1400. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... Events Henry IV quells baron rebellion and executes The Earls of Kent, Huntingdon and Salisbury for their attempt to have Richard II of England restored as King Jean Froissart writes the Chronicles Medici family becomes powerful in Florence, Italy Births December 25 - John Sutton, 1st Baron Dudley, Lord Lieutenant of... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hunting spear and knife, from Mesa Verde National Park. ...


Halberd

A halberd (or Swiss voulge) is a two-handed pole weapon that came to prominent use during the 14th and 15th centuries. Possibly the word halberd comes from the German words Halm (staff), and Barte (axe). The halberd consists of an axe blade topped with a spike mounted on a long shaft. It always has a hook or thorn on the back side of the axe blade for grappling mounted combatants. It is very similar in many ways to certain forms of voulge. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A shaft can be Look up shaft in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A voulge (rarely called a pole cleaver) is a type of polearm that existed along side the similar glaive in medieval Europe. ...


Naginata

A naginata (なぎなた or 薙刀) is a pole weapon that was traditionally used in Japan by members of the samurai class. It has become associated with women and in modern Japan it is studied by women more than men; whereas in Europe and Australia naginata is practiced predominantly (but not exclusively) by men. A naginata consists of a wood shaft with a curved blade on the end; it is similar to the European glaive. Usually it also had a sword-like guard (tsuba) between the blade and shaft. A samurai wielding a naginata Naginata (なぎなた, 長刀 or 薙刀) is a pole weapon that was traditionally used in Japan by members of the samurai class. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... This article concerns how a man differs from women. ... A typical tsuba The angle of the sabre in shodan no kamae is determined by the tsuba and the curvature of the blade (shinai are stright, but real weapons are curved) Wikimedia Commons has media related to: tsuba The tsuba (鍔) is a round guard at the end of the grip...


Voulge

A voulge (occasionally called a pole cleaver) is a type of polearm that existed alongside the similar glaive in medieval Europe. Superficially, a voulge might strongly resemble a glaive, but there are some notable differences in construction. First, the attachment of the voulge blade to the shaft was usually done by binding the lower two thirds of the blade to the side of the pole; the glaive would often have a socket built into the blade itself and was mounted on top of the pole. In addition, while both had curved blades, that of the voulge was broad and meant for hacking, while that of the glaive was narrow and meant more for cutting. Indeed, a voulge looks something like a squashed bardiche head, or just a meat cleaver attached to a long pole. A voulge (rarely called a pole cleaver) is a type of polearm that existed along side the similar glaive in medieval Europe. ... Chinese and old North American cleavers A cleaver is a large knife that varies in its shape but usually resembles a square-bladed hatchet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Classic Example This is a page about the long poleaxe. ...


See also

A bec de corbin is a type of pole weapon that was popular in medieval Europe. ... Pole weapons and Mortuary Swords in the Great Hall of Edinburgh Castle. ... The Ji, the Chinese halberd, was used from the Shang dynasty onwards, until the Song dynasty. ... A Lochaber Axe at two different distances. ... Ngaw (ง้าว,ของ้าว) is a pole weapon that was traditionally used in Thailand by elephant warrior. ... A partisan (also partizan) is a type of polearm that was used in Europe during medieval times. ... A modern recreation of a mid-17th century company of pikemen. ... A bardiche or long poleaxe is a type of polearm that was used during times of war in medieval Europe. ...

References

  • Fine, Tom (2003). A summary of polearms. (as used in Nethack). Accessed on 8 June 2006.

This article is about the role-playing game. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Spotlight: The Medieval Poleaxe by Alexi Goranov

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pole weapon (302 words)
A pole weapon is a close combat weapon with the main fighting part of the weapon placed on the end of a long shaft, typically of wood.
Pole weapons are relatively cheap and simple to make, and they were fairly easy for most people to use effectively as they were often derived from hunting or agricultural tools.
Pole weapons include the spear, the lance, the halberd, the pike, the naginata, the scythe, the poleax, the bill, the long war hammer and many, many more.
Medieval Polearms,Medieval Polearms Manufacturers,Medieval Polearms Exporters (762 words)
A pole arm is a weapon on the end of a stick and is specifically an infantry weapon.
The additional reach the pole gives affords the wielder of the weapon the advantage of striking the enemy before he himself can be struck, or holding the enemy at a distance.
Weapons from the late medieval period were either far more specialized than the models from which they sprang, or else were combination weapons trying to combine the strengths of the more specialized arms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m