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Encyclopedia > Pokemon

Editing of this article by unregistered or newly registered users is currently disabled. If you are prevented from editing this article, and you wish to make a change, please discuss changes on the talk page, request unprotection, log in, or create an account. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

The official Pokémon logo.
The official Pokémon logo.

Pokémon (ポケモン Pokemon?, IPA: [ˈpoʊ.keɪ.mɑn]) is a media franchise owned by video game giant Nintendo and created by Satoshi Tajiri around 1995. Originally released as a pair of interlinkable Game Boy role-playing video games, Pokémon has since become the second most successful and lucrative videogame-based media franchise in the world, falling only behind Nintendo's Mario series.[1] Pokémon properties have since been merchandised into anime, manga, trading cards, toys, books, and other media. The franchise celebrated its tenth anniversary on 27 February 2006, and as of 1 December 2006, cumulative sold units of the video games (including home console versions) have reached more than 155 million copies.[2] Zbtb7, originally named Pokemon, is a gene that may act as a master switch for cancer. ... Second generation Pokemon logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Satoshi Tajiri , born on August 28, 1965) is a Japanese electronic game designer and the creator of Pocket Monsters, better known as Pokémon. ... The Game Boy ) line is a line of battery-powered handheld game consoles sold by Nintendo. ... Computer role-playing games (CRPGs), often shortened to simply role-playing games (RPGs), are a type of video or computer game that traditionally use gameplay elements found in paper-and-pencil role-playing games. ... It has been suggested that Multiplayer game be merged into this article or section. ... Mario ), originally called Jumpman, is a popular video game character created by the company Nintendo, and is also the titular hero of numerous successful video games, many of the platforming genre. ... A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common practice in product merchandising. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... Manga )   (pl. ... Collectible card games (CCGs), also called trading card games (TCGs) or customizable card games (a phrase specific to two Decipher, Inc. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand, "Pocket Monsters" (ポケットモンスター Poketto Monsutā?),[3] as such contractions are very common in Japan. The term "Pokémon", in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 493 fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the recent release of the newest Pokémon role-playing games (RPGs) for the Nintendo DS, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. As with the words deer and sheep, the singular and plural forms of the word "Pokémon" do not differ, nor does each individual species name; in short, it is grammatically correct to say both "one Pokémon" and "many Pokémon". Nintendo originally translated Poketto Monsutā literally, but a naming conflict with the Monster in My Pocket toy line caused Nintendo to rebrand the franchise as "Pokémon" in early 1996.[citation needed] The game's catchphrase in the Japanese language versions of the franchise is "ポケモンGETだぜ! (Pokémon Getto Daze! - Let's Get Pokémon!)"[citation needed]; in English language versions of the franchise, it was originally "Gotta catch 'em all!," although it is now no longer officially used except in the spin-off anime series Pokémon Chronicles. Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji The romanization of Japanese is the use of the Latin alphabet (called rōmaji )   in Japanese) to write the Japanese language, which is normally written in logographic characters borrowed from Chinese (kanji) and syllabic scripts... In traditional grammar, a contraction is the formation of a new word from two or more individual words. ... This is a complete list of Pokémon which appear in the National Pokédex as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. ... NDS redirects here. ... This article is about the video games. ... “Fawn” redirects here. ... Species See text. ... Monster in My Pocket was a toy line developed by Morrison Entertainment Group, headed by Joe Morrison and John Weems, and released by Matchbox in 1990 consisting of small, soft plastic monsters from religion and mythology, literary fantasy, and unexplained phenomena. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Japanese  ) is a language spoken by over 130 million people, mainly in Japan, but also by Japanese emigrant communities around the world. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Pokémon Chronicles, known in Japan as ShÅ«kan Pokemon Hōsōkyoku (週刊ポケモン放送局) (Weekly Pokemon Broadcast), is a spin-off series of the Pokémon anime, revolving around characters other than Ash. ...


In November 2005, 4Kids Entertainment, which had managed the non-game related licensing of Pokémon, announced that it had agreed not to renew the Pokémon representation agreement. Pokémon USA Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Pokémon Co., now oversees all Pokémon licensing outside of Asia.[4] 4Kids Entertainment (NYSE: KDE) (commonly known as 4Kids) is an American film and television production company specializing in the acquisition, production and licensing of childrens entertainment around the world. ...

Contents

Collecting and playing

The concept of the Pokémon universe, in both the video games and the general fictional world of Pokémon, stems from the hobby of insect collecting, a popular pastime which Pokémon executive director Satoshi Tajiri had enjoyed as a child.[5] Players of the games are designated as Pokémon Trainers, and the two general goals (in most Pokémon games) for such Trainers are to complete the Pokédex by collecting all of the available Pokémon species found in the fictional region where that game takes place; and to train a team of powerful Pokémon from those they have caught to compete against teams owned by other Trainers, and eventually become the strongest Trainer, the Pokémon Master. These themes of collecting, training, and battling are present in almost every version of the Pokémon franchise, including the video games, the anime and manga series, and the Pokémon Trading Card Game. Since Pokémon Crystal, trainers in the video games can be male or female. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pokemon logo This article deals with the video games. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... This article is about the card game. ...


In most incarnations of the fictional Pokémon universe, a Trainer that encounters a wild Pokémon is able to capture that Pokémon by throwing at it a specially designed, mass-producible tool called a Poké Ball. If the Pokémon is unable to escape the confines of the Poké Ball, that Pokémon is officially considered under the ownership of that Trainer, and it will obey whatever commands its new master and/or friend (depending on how that trainer treats Pokémon in general) issues to it from that point onward, unless the Trainer demonstrates enough of a lack of experience that the Pokémon would rather act on its own accord. Trainers can "send out" any of their Pokémon to wage a non-lethal battle against another Pokémon; if the opposing Pokémon is wild, the Trainer can capture that Pokémon with a Poké Ball, increaing his or her collection of creatures. (Pokémon already owned by other Trainers cannot be captured, except under special circumstances in certain games.) If a Pokémon fully defeats an opponent in battle so that the opponent is knocked out ("faints"), the winning Pokémon gains experience and may level up. When levelling up, the Pokémon's statistics ("stats") of battling aptitude increase, including Attack, Speed, and so on. From time to time the Pokémon may also learn new moves, techniques which are used in battle. In addition, many species of Pokémon possess the ability to undergo a form of metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species of Pokémon, a process called evolution. The Poké Ball is both a logo for the Pokémon franchise as a whole and an important object to Pokémon trainers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Shiny Pokémon be merged into this article or section. ... Moves are the techniques Pokémon use to battle. ... A cicada in the process of shedding. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the main series, each game's single-player mode requires the Trainer to raise a team of Pokémon to defeat many non-player character (NPC) Trainers and their Pokémon. Each game lays out a somewhat linear path through a specific region of the Pokémon world for the Trainer to journey through, completing events and battlling opponents along the way. Each game features eight especially powerful Trainers, referred to as Gym Leaders, that the Trainer must each defeat in a Pokémon battle in order to progress. As a reward, the Trainer receives a Gym Badge, and once all eight badges are collected, that Trainer is eligible to challenge the region's Pokémon League, where four immensely talented trainers (referred to collectively as the "Elite Four") challenge the Trainer to four Pokémon battles in succession. If the trainer can overcome this gauntlet, he or she must then challenge the Regional Champion, the master Trainer who had previously defeated the Elite Four. Any Trainer who wins this last battle becomes the new champion and gains the title of Pokémon Master. An NPC from the video game The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion. ...


Generations

The original Pokémon games were Japanese RPGs with an element of strategy, and were created by Satoshi Tajiri for the Game Boy. These role-playing games, and their sequels, remakes, and English language translations, are still considered the "main" Pokémon games, and the games which most fans of the series are referring to when they use the term "Pokémon games." Pokemon logo This article deals with the video games. ... It has been suggested that computer role-playing game be merged into this article or section. ...


All of the licensed Pokémon properties overseen by The Pokémon Company are divided roughly by generation. These generations are roughly chronological divisions by release; every several years, when an official sequel in the main RPG series is released that features new Pokémon, characters, and gameplay concepts, that sequel is considered the start of a new generation of the franchise. The main games and their spin-offs, the anime, the manga, and the trading card game are all updated with the new Pokémon properties each time a new generation begins. The franchise is currently in its fourth generation. Pokémon USA, Inc is an American industry that distributes products for Pokémon gaming & anime. ... Chronology is the science of locating events in time. ...

A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red.
A level 5 Bulbasaur involved in a battle with a level 5 Charmander in Pokémon Red.[6]

The Pokémon franchise started off in its first generation with its initial release of Pokémon Red and Green for the Game Boy in Japan. When these games proved extremely popular, an enhanced Blue version was released sometime after, and the Blue version was reprogrammed as Pokémon Red and Blue for international release. The games launched in the United States on September 30, 1998. The original Red and Green versions were never released outside of Japan.[7] Afterwards, a further enhanced remake titled Pokémon Yellow was released to partially take advantage of the color palette of the Game Boy Color, as well as to feature more of a stylistic resemblance to the popular Pokémon anime. This first generation of games introduced the original 151 species of Pokémon (in National Pokédex order, encompassing all Pokémon from Bulbasaur to Mew), as well as the basic game concepts of capturing, training, battling, and trading Pokémon with both computer and human players. These versions of the games take place within the fictional Kanto region, though the name "Kanto" was not used until the second generation. Spin-off first-generation titles include Pokémon Pinball, an adaption of the Pokémon Trading Card Game for Game Boy Color, an on-rails photography simulator for Nintendo 64 titled Pokémon Snap, a Nintendo 64 Pokémon-themed adaption of Tetris Attack named Pokémon Puzzle League, a 3D Nintendo 64 incarnation of the handheld RPGs' battle system named Pokémon Stadium, and a co-starring role for several species in the Nintendo 64 fighting game Super Smash Bros.[8] Image File history File links Bulbasaur_pokemon_red. ... Image File history File links Bulbasaur_pokemon_red. ... Bulbasaur Fushigidane in original Japanese language versions) are the first of the 493 of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Charmander Hitokage in original Japanese language versions) is the fourth of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... 1998 1998 in games 1997 in video gaming 1999 in video gaming Notable events of 1998 in video gaming. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... The Game Boy Color (also referred to as GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States. ... This is a complete list of Pokémon which appear in the National Pokédex as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. ... Bulbasaur Fushigidane in original Japanese language versions) are the first of the 493 of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Mew ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Pinball ) is a pinball game based on Pokémon Red and Blue. ... This article is about the card game. ... The Game Boy Color (also referred to as GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States. ... Nintendo 64 ) is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Pokémon Snap ) is a video game developed by HAL Laboratory and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... Tetris Attack is a cartridge video game released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) in North America and Europe. ... Pokémon Puzzle League is a puzzle game for the Nintendo 64 console. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the Nintendo 64 game. ...

Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.
Screenshot of Pokémon Crystal, portraying a player's Level 18 Croconaw battling a Level 13 Snubbull.

The second generation of Pokémon began in 2000 with the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver for Game Boy Color. Like the previous generation, an enhanced remake titled Pokémon Crystal was later released. It introduced 100 new species of Pokémon (starting with Chikorita and ending with Celebi), for a total of 251 Pokémon to collect, train, and battle. New gameplay features include a day-and-night system (reflecting the time of the day in the real world) which influences events in the game; full utilization of the Game Boy Color's color palette; an improved interface and upgraded inventory system; better balance in the collection of Pokémon and their moves, statistics, and equippable items (a new addition); Pokémon breeding; and a new region named Johto. Unique to the second generation games is the fact that, after exploring Johto, the player can enter and explore the original Kanto region, which lies to the east of Johto. Spin-off second-generation titles include the Game Boy Color adaption of Pokémon Puzzle League named Pokémon Puzzle Challenge, a Nintendo 64 pet simulator named Hey you, Pikachu!, the Pokémon Stadium sequel Pokémon Stadium 2 for Nintendo 64, several Pokémon mini-games for the e-Reader, and a co-starring role for many species in the Super Smash Bros. sequel Super Smash Bros. Melee for Nintendo Gamecube.[9] Image File history File links Croconaw_screen. ... Image File history File links Croconaw_screen. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Croconaw ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Snubbull , Bulu in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional character of the Pokémon franchise. ... 2000 2000 in games 1999 in video gaming 2001 in video gaming Notable events of 2000 in video gaming. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Game Boy Color (also referred to as GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chikorita (チコリータ Chikoriita in Japanese, Endivie in German and Germignon in French) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ... Celebi ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon from the Pokémon Franchise – a series of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Pokémon breeding refers to the breeding of fictional creatures called Pokémon to create Pokémon eggs which hatch into new Pokémon, usually inheriting some traits from each parent. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Puzzle Challenge is a video game for the Game Boy Color. ... Hey You, Pikachu! is a Nintendo 64 game released in 2000. ... Pokémon Stadium 2 (Pokémon Stadium GS in Japan) is a video game for the Nintendo 64. ... This article is about the Nintendo device. ... Super Smash Bros. ... The Nintendo GameCube , GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ...

A Pokémon Emerald screenshot featuring an enemy Pupitar and Solrock fighting in a double battle against a player's Aggron and Smeargle.

Pokémon entered its third generation with the 2003 release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance and continued with the Game Boy Advance remakes of Pokémon Red and Blue, Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, and an enhanced remake of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire titled Pokémon Emerald. The third generation introduced 135 new Pokémon (starting with Treecko and ending with Deoxys) for a total of 386 species. It also features a much more visually detailed environment compared to previous games, a new 2-on-2 Pokémon battling mechanic, a special ability system applying to each Pokémon in battle, the Pokémon Contest sub-game, and the new region of Hoenn. However, this generation also garnered some criticism for leaving out several gameplay features, including the day-and-night system introduced in the previous generation, and it was also the first installment that encouraged the player to collect merely a selected assortment of the total number of Pokémon rather than every existing species (202 out of 386 species are catchable in the Ruby and Sapphire versions). Third-generation spin-off titles include Pokémon Pinball: Ruby and Sapphire for Game Boy Advance; Pokémon Mystery Dungeon for Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS; Pokémon Dash, Pokémon Trozei! and Pokémon Ranger for Nintendo DS; Pokémon Channel and Pokémon Box for Nintendo GameCube; and a separate RPG series for Nintendo GameCube, consisting of the games Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness. Image File history File links Pokémon_Emerald_screenshot. ... Image File history File links Pokémon_Emerald_screenshot. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pupitar (サナギラス Sanagiras in Japan, Pupitar in Germany and Ymphect in France) is a fictional character from the Pokémon franchise. ... Solrock ) is a fictional being from the Pokémon franchise, that was introduced in the 3rd generation of games, anime, and cards. ... Aggron (Bossgodora ボスゴドラ Bosugodora in Japan, Stolloss in Germany and Galeking in France) is a fictional creature from the Pokémon universe. ... Smeargle ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon from the Pokémon Franchise – a series of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... 2003 2003 in games 2002 in video gaming 2004 in video gaming Notable events of 2003 in computer and video games. ... Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire , Pocket Monsters Ruby, Sapphire), released on March 17, 2003 in North America for the Game Boy Advance, mark the beginning of the third generation in the Pokémon series of RPGs. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen are two titles in the Pokémon video game series, released for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Treecko Kimori in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Deoxys , pronounced //) is one of the fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Hoenn map The Hoenn Pokédex Hoenn (pronounced Hoe-en and spelled Hōen in Japan) is a last name and is also a region in the Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald games. ... Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team ) and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team ) are a matched pair of Pokémon games for the Game Boy Advance and Nintendo DS, respectively. ... NDS redirects here. ... Pokémon Dash! is the first (and currently only) Pokémon racing game, and is also the first Pokémon game for the Nintendo DS. In Japan and Europe, it was a launch title for the DS. Using a stylus, the player can control their favorite Pokémon and race... Pokémon Trozei! (ポケモントローゼ/Pokemon Torōze; also known as Pokémon Link! in Europe) is a Pokémon-themed puzzle game for the Nintendo DS, much like Pokémon Puzzle League and Pokémon Puzzle Challenge. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Box: Ruby and Sapphire, or Pokémon Box, is one of the Pokémon games on the Nintendo GameCube console. ... Pokémon Colosseum is the first GameCube incarnation of the Pokémon video game franchise. ...

An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and Pearl
An in-game battle between Chatot and Buizel from Pokémon Diamond and Pearl

In 2006, Japan began the fourth generation of the franchise with the release of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for Nintendo DS, which will be released in North America on April 22, 2007.[10] The fourth generation introduces another 107 new species of Pokémon (starting with Turtwig and ending with Arseus), bringing the current total of Pokémon species to 493. New gameplay concepts include a restructured move-classification system, online multiplayer trading and battling via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, the return (and expansion) of the second generation's day-and-night system, the expansion of the third generation's Pokémon Contests into "Super Contests," and the new region of Sinnoh, which has an underground component for multiplayer gameplay in addition to the main overworld. Currently, spin-off titles in the fourth generation include the Pokémon Stadium follow-up Pokémon Battle Revolution for Wii (which will have Wi-Fi connectivity as well[11]) and a confirmed co-starring role for Pikachu in the 2007 Wii fighter Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[12]
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Chatot , Perap in original Japanese language versions) is a Pokémon that was introduced in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl on the Nintendo DS. It was revealed alongside Tamanta and Buoysel. ... Buizel , Buoysel in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Notable events of 2006 in video gaming. ... This article is about the video games. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 2007 in games 2006 in video gaming 2008 in video gaming Notable events of 2007 in video gaming. ... Turtwig , Naetle in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Arseus , Arseus in original Japanese language versions) is the 493rd of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Each Pokémon is allowed to know up to four moves. ... Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection logo The Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection is an online service run by Nintendo to facilitate free Internet play in compatible Nintendo DS and Wii games. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Battle Revolution ) is the first Pokémon game on Nintendos Wii home console. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Screenshot of Kung Fu Master (1984, Irem). ... Super Smash Bros. ...


Game mechanics

Main article: Pokémon game mechanics

It has been suggested that Shiny Pokémon be merged into this article or section. ...

Starter Pokémon

One of the consistent aspects of most Pokémon games – spanning from Pokémon Red and Blue on the Nintendo Game Boy to the Nintendo DS game, Pokémon Diamond and Pearl – is the choice of one of three different Pokémon at the start of the player's adventures; these three are often labeled "starter Pokémon." Players can choose a Water-type, a Fire-type, or a Grass-type Pokémon indigenous to that particular region.[13] The exception to this rule is Pokémon Yellow (a remake of the original games that follows the story of the Pokémon anime), where players are given a Pikachu, an Electric-type mouse Pokémon, famous for being the mascot of the Pokémon media franchise; in this game, however, the three starter Pokémon from Red and Blue can be obtained during the quest by a single player, something that is not possible in any other installment of the franchise.[14] This article deals with the Pokémon video games. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... The Game Boy ) line is a line of battery-powered handheld game consoles sold by Nintendo. ... NDS redirects here. ... This article is about the video games. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Type Chart Pokémon types represent the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon. ...

First generation
Second generation
Third generation
Fourth generation

Charmander Hitokage in original Japanese language versions) is the fourth of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Bulbasaur Fushigidane in original Japanese language versions) are the first of the 493 of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Squirtle Zenigame in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Cyndaquil ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Chikorita (チコリータ Chikoriita in Japanese, Endivie in German and Germignon in French) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise. ... Totodile (ワニノコ Waninoko in Japanese, Karnimani in German and Kaiminus in French) is a fictional character of the Pokémon franchise. ... The Torchic Achamo in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Treecko Kimori in original Japanese language versions) is a fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Mudkip , Mizugorou in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Chimchar Hikozaru in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Turtwig , Naetle in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Piplup , Pochama in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...

Pokédex

Main article: Pokédex

The Pokédex is a fictional electronic device featured in the Pokémon video game and anime series. In the games, whenever a Pokémon is first captured, its data will be added to a player's Pokédex, but in the anime or manga, the Pokédex is a comprehensive electronic reference encyclopedia, usually referred to in order to deliver exposition. "Pokédex" is also used to refer to a list of Pokémon, usually a list of Pokémon by number. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a cultural phenomenon. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... Pokémon Adventures, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters SPECIAL ), is a Pokémon-related manga based on the video games. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Exposition (plot device) and Plot dump . ...


In the video games, a Pokémon Trainer is issued a blank device at the start of their journey. A trainer must then attempt to fill the Pokédex by encountering and at least briefly obtaining each of the various different species of Pokémon. A player will receive the name and image of a Pokémon after encountering one that was not previously in the Pokédex, typically after battling said Pokémon, either in the wild or in a trainer battle (with the exceptions of link battles and tournament battles, such as in the Battle Frontier). More detailed information is available after the player obtains a member of the species, either through capturing the Pokémon in the wild, evolving a previously captured Pokémon, hatching a Pokémon egg (from the second generation onwards), or through a trade with another trainer (either an NPC or another player). This information includes height, weight, species type, and a short description of the Pokémon. Later versions of the Pokédex have more detailed information, like the size of a certain Pokémon compared to the player character, or Pokémon being sorted by their habitat (so far, the latter feature is only in the FireRed and LeafGreen versions). The GameCube games, Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD, have a Pokémon Digital Assistant (PDA) which is similar to the Pokédex, but also tells what types are effective against a Pokémon and gives a description of its abilities. Since Pokémon Crystal, trainers in the video games can be male or female. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... Pokémon Colosseum is the first GameCube incarnation of the Pokémon video game franchise. ... Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness is an upcoming role-playing game from Nintendos Pokémon franchise for the Nintendo GameCube. ...


In other media

Main article: Pokémon in other media

Pokémon , IPA //, although frequently, and even intentionally mispronounced //), is a multi-billion dollar media franchise[1] controlled by video game giant Nintendo. ...

Anime series

Main article: Pokémon (anime)
Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.
Screenshot of Pokémon anime. From left to right: Brock, May, Max, Misty, Ash and Pikachu.

The Pokémon anime series and films are a meta-series of adventures separate from the canon that most of the Pokémon video games follow (with the exception of Pokémon Yellow, a game based on the anime storyline). The anime follows the quest of the main character, Ash Ketchum[15], a Pokémon Master in training, as he and a small group of friends[15] travel around the fictitious world of Pokémon along with their various Pokémon partners. Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... Image File history File links © This image is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links © This image is copyrighted. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pokémon Yellow: Special Pikachu Edition is the fourth game in the Pokémon video game series in Japan, and the third in North America and Europe. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ...


The original series, titled Pocket Monsters, or simply Pokémon in western countries (often referred to as Pokémon: Gotta Catch Em All to distinguish it from the later series), begins with Ash's first day as a Pokémon trainer. His first (and signature) Pokémon is a Pikachu, differing from the games, where only Bulbasaur, Charmander or Squirtle could be chosen.[16] The series follows the storyline of the original games, Pokémon Red and Blue, in the region of Kanto. Accompanying Ash on his journeys are Brock, the Pewter City Gym Leader, and Misty, the youngest of the Gym Leader sisters from Cerulean City. Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Bulbasaur Fushigidane in original Japanese language versions) are the first of the 493 of Pokémon creatures from the Japanese Pokémon media franchise. ... Charmander Hitokage in original Japanese language versions) is the fourth of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the Pokémon media franchise. ... Squirtle Zenigame in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue are the first two installments of the Pokémon series of role-playing video games, released for the Game Boy in Japan in 1996. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of the major cities and locations from the fictional Kanto region featured in the Pokémon series. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of the major cities and locations from the fictional Kanto region featured in the Pokémon series. ...


Pokémon: Adventures in the Orange Islands follows Ash's adventures in the Orange Islands, a place unique to the anime, and replaces Brock with Tracey Sketchit, an artist and "Pokémon watcher." The next series, based on the second generation of games, include Pokémon: Johto Journeys, Pokémon: Johto League Champions, and Pokémon: Master Quest, following the original trio of Ash, Brock, and Misty in the western Johto region. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Ash Ketchum and Pikachu together in the pilot episode, Pokémon, I Choose You!

The saga continues in Pokémon: Advanced, Pokémon: Advanced Challenge, and Pokémon: Advanced Battle, based on the third generation games. Ash and company travel to Hoenn, a southern region in the Pokémon World. Ash takes on the role of a teacher and mentor for a novice Pokémon trainer named May. Her brother Max accompanies them, and though he isn't a trainer, he knows large amounts of handy information. Brock (from the original series) soon catches up with Ash, but Misty has returned to Cerulean City to tend to her duties as a gym leader. (Misty, along with other recurring characters, appears in the spin-off series Pokémon Chronicles.) The Advanced Generation concludes with the Battle Frontier saga, based off the Emerald version and including aspects of FireRed and LeafGreen. Image File history File links Pokémon_episode_1_screenshot. ... Image File history File links Pokémon_episode_1_screenshot. ... The Pocket Monsters logo This is a list of episodes in the first season of the Pokemon animated series ), covering the introduction of series protagonist Ash Ketchum and his friends and his adventures on the way to the Indigo League. ... Hoenn map The Hoenn Pokédex Hoenn (pronounced Hoe-en and spelled Hōen in Japan) is a last name and is also a region in the Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald games. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Max ) is one of the main protagonists of the Pokémon anime series, featuring the in the main series between the sixth,[2] and ninth seasons. ... Pokémon Chronicles, known in Japan as ShÅ«kan Pokemon Hōsōkyoku (週刊ポケモン放送局) (Weekly Pokemon Broadcast), is a spin-off series of the Pokémon anime, revolving around characters other than Ash. ...


The most recent series is the Diamond and Pearl series, with Max leaving to pick his starter Pokémon, and May going to the Grand Festival in Johto. Ash, Brock and a new companion named Dawn travel through the region of Sinnoh. The series is set for release in the US in a special hour block on the 20th of April. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Pokémon Trading Card Game

Dragonite, a typical Pokémon Trading Card Game card.

The Pokémon Trading Card Game is a collectible card game similar in goal to a Pokémon battle in the video game series. Players use Pokémon cards, with individual strengths and weaknesses, in an attempt to defeat their opponent by "knocking out" his or her Pokémon cards.[17] This article is about the card game. ... Image File history File links Dragonite_Pokémon_card. ... Image File history File links Dragonite_Pokémon_card. ... Dragonite , Kairyu in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 (see TFD) fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Rare Candy illustration found in the trading card game The Pokémon Trading Card Game was first introduced to North America in 1999, and in Japan at an earlier date (exact date unknown). ... Collectible card games (CCGs), also called trading card games (TCGs) or customizable card games (a phrase specific to two Decipher, Inc. ...


The game was first published in North America by Wizards of the Coast in 1999.[18] However, with the release of Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire Game Boy Advance video games, Nintendo USA took back the card game from Wizards of the Coast and started publishing the cards themselves.[18] The Expedition expansion introduced the Pokémon-e Trading Card Game, the cards in which (for the most part) were compatible with the Nintendo e-Reader. Nintendo discontinued its production of e-Reader compatible cards with the release of EX FireRed & LeafGreen. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Wizards of the Coast (often referred to as WotC or simply Wizards) is a publisher of games, primarily based on fantasy and science fiction themes. ... Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire , Pocket Monsters Ruby, Sapphire), released on March 17, 2003 in North America for the Game Boy Advance, mark the beginning of the third generation in the Pokémon series of RPGs. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Multiplayer game be merged into this article or section. ... Pokémon USA, Inc is an American industry that distributes products for Pokémon gaming & anime. ... This article is about the Nintendo device. ...


In 1998, Nintendo released a Game Boy Color version of the trading card game in Japan. It was also released in the US and Europe in 2000. This game included digital versions cards from the original set of cards and the first two expansions (Jungle and Fossil), but also included several cards exclusive to the game. A sequel to this game exists, but was not released outside of Japan. The Game Boy Color (also referred to as GBC) is Nintendos successor to the Game Boy and was released on October 21, 1998 in Japan and in November of 1998 in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Manga

Main article: Pokémon (manga)

There are various Pokémon manga series, four of which were released in English by Viz Communications, and seven of them released in English by Chuang Yi. The Pokémon games are strategy games with a small RPG element which allow players to catch, collect, and train pets with various abilities, and battle them against each other to build their strength and evolve them into more powerful Pokémon. ... Manga )   (pl. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article deals with the American media company. ... Chuang Yi is a manga and manhwa publisher and distributor based in Singapore. ...

Manga released in English
  • The Electric Tale of Pikachu (a.k.a Dengeki Pikachu), a shōnen manga created by Toshihiro Ono. It was divided into four tankōbon, each given a separate title in the North American and English Singapore versions: The Electric Tale of Pikachu, Pikachu Shocks Back, Electric Pikachu Boogaloo, and Surf’s Up, Pikachu. The series is based loosely on the anime.
  • Pokémon Adventures, a shōnen manga based on the video games.
  • Magical Pokémon Journey (a.k.a. Pokémon: PiPiPi Adventures), a shōjo manga
  • Pikachu Meets the Press (newspaper style comics, not released by Chuang Yi)
  • Ash & Pikachu (a.k.a. Satoshi to Pikachu, not released by Viz)
  • Pokémon Gold & Silver (not released by Viz)
  • Pokémon Ruby-Sapphire and Pokémon Pocket Monsters (not released by Viz)
  • Pokémon: Jirachi Wishmaker (not released by Viz)
  • Pokémon: Destiny Deoxys (not released by Viz)
  • Pokémon: Lucario and the Mystery of Mew (The third movie-to-comic adaptation.)
Manga not released in English
  • Pokémon Card Ni Natta Wake (How I Became a Pokémon Card) by Kagemaru Himeno, an artist for the TCG. There are six volumes and each includes a special promotional card. The stories tell the tales of the art behind some of Himeno’s cards.
  • Pokémon Getto Da ze! by Asada Miho
  • Poketto Monsutaa Chamo Chamo Puritei by Yumi Tsukirino, who also made Magical Pokémon Journey.
  • Pokémon Card Master
  • Pocket Monsters Emerald Challenge!! Battle Frontier by Ihara Shigekatsu
  • Pocket Monsters Zensho by Satomi Nakamura

To meet the WikiProject Pokémon Collaborative Projects quality standards, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Shōnen or shounen (å°‘å¹´) is a Japanese word usually translated as young boy, although it is commonly used to refer to males of up to high-school age as well. ... Tankōbon ) is the Japanese term for a compilation volume of a particular series (such as a manga or a novel series, magazine articles, essays, craft patterns, etc. ... Pokémon Adventures, released in Japan as Pocket Monsters SPECIAL ), is a Pokémon-related manga based on the video games. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and the Pokémon Collaborative Projects article style, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Shōjo or shoujo (少女 lit. ... Pikachu Meets the Press: A Pokémon Newspaper Strip Collection is a series of newspaper-style manga written by Gerard Jones and illustrated by Ashura Benimaru. ... To meet the WikiProject Pokémon Collaborative Projects quality standards, this Pokémon-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Pokémon Gold & Silver (Japanese title: Golden Boys) is a manga series based on the Pokémon games called Pokémon Gold and Silver. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Pocket Monsters Zensho (ポケットモンスター全書 Poketto Monsutā Zensho) is a manga graphic novel written by Satomi Nakamura (中村里美 Nakamura Satomi). ...

Criticism

Main article: Criticism of Pokémon

The Pokémon franchise has sparked some controversy and criticism. ...

Racism

The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.
The original black-skinned Jynx design and source of the controversy.

This original design of the Pokémon Jynx (seen to the right) bore a striking, but possibly coincidental, resemblance to entertainers in blackface. A strong case can be made for Jynx being a parody of or homage to the Japanese Ganguro and Yamanba fashion trends, which were extremely popular when Pokémon was first released. Blackface-influenced characters have appeared elsewhere in anime and manga - examples can be found near the beginning of Osamu Tezuka's early graphic novel, Metropolis and also can be found with Dragon Ball Z's Mr. Popo. Image File history File links Original_Jynx_design. ... Image File history File links Original_Jynx_design. ... Jynx , Rougela) is a fictional character in the Pokémon franchise, originally introduced in Pokémon Red and Blue. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... Ganguro gals. ... Yamanba ) sometimes written as yamamba, is a fashion trend among Japanese young women. ... Dr. Osamu Tezuka , November 3, 1928 - February 9, 1989) was a mangaka (Japanese manga artist) and animator. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Dragon Ball Z ) is the award-winning adaptation of the second portion of the immensely popular Dragon Ball manga written and drawn by Akira Toriyama, this makes it the sequel to the Dragon Ball anime. ... Mr. ...


As Pokémon became more popular in the United States, this perceived similarity to a racist image from the United States' past offended some. In particular, it offended children's book author Carole Boston Weatherford, who accused Jynx of being a racist stereotype in an article titled "Politically Incorrect Pokémon" in the magazine Black World Today, shortly after the anime episode Holiday Hi-Jynx aired.[citation needed] As a result, later episodes of the anime which feature Jynx were either banned or edited in the United States. Carole Boston Weatherford is an African American author and cultural critic, now living in North Carolina, USA. She writes childrens books, poetry, history, and social commentary, and has won several awards. ... There are over 400 episodes of the Pokémon anime. ...


In 2002, in response to this controversy, Nintendo changed Jynx's face from black to purple and its hands from blue to purple in the video game series, a change which would be reflected in the anime three years later.[citation needed]


Animal cruelty

The primary mechanism of Pokémon has been compared to the generally-outlawed practice of cockfighting.[19] Seen from this point of view, the game consists primarily of Pokémon trainers capturing and bartering in wild animals, coercing them to fight one another, and also features various performance-enhancing drugs to give them an edge in the fight. Some people believe that this may encourage children to commit acts of animal cruelty and illegal gambling.[20] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In spite of these allegations, Pokémon maintains a fan base that views the battling as a friendly competition between two teams of Pokémon and their trainers. Seen in this light, Pokémon are not being coerced to battle by their trainers. There are references to some Pokémon being territorial (e.g. Pidgeotto[21]), but it is vastly different to the aggressively territorial nature of roosters, who will maim the "enemy" rooster until it or the other dies. Furthermore, trainers do not relish the idea of allowing two animals (or, in this case, Pokémon) to fight to the death while merely viewing from the edge of the "ring"; rather, Pokémon trainers are usually depicted as fighting alongside their Pokémon and providing moral support, not simply issuing commands for them to follow. In addition to all of the above, Pokémon do not actually die from battle; they either "faint" or are otherwise made unable to battle. Pidgeotto , Pigeon) is one of the 401 fictional species of Pokémon in the Pokémon franchise (a series of video games, anime, manga, trading cards and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri). ...


In both the games and the anime, the audience is taught that fighting is not necessarily a means to an end, and those who would rather fight than compromise are often portrayed in a negative light. Furthermore, the use of Pokémon for selfish or "evil" purposes is frowned upon, and organizations such as Team Rocket, which is often depicted using Pokémon solely for personal (and usually monetary) gain, are generally considered villains.


Health

Main article: Banned episodes of Pokémon
One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.
One frame of the scene that caused the seizures.

On December 16, 1997, more than 635 Japanese children were admitted to hospitals with convulsive epileptic seizures. It was determined that the seizures were caused by watching an episode of Pokémon, "Dennō Senshi Porygon," (most commonly translated "Electric Soldier Porygon", season 1, episode 43); as a result, this episode has not been aired since. In this particular episode, there were bright explosions with rapidly-alternating blue and red color patterns.[22] It was determined in subsequent research that these strobing light effects cause some individuals to have epileptic seizures, even if the person had no previous history of epilepsy. As a consequence, many publishers (including Nintendo) added warning labels to their video game products (or made pre-existing labels more prominent), warning that exposure to video games may trigger seizures in individuals vulnerable to photosensitive epilepsy. There are over 400 episodes of the Pokémon anime. ... Image File history File links Pikachu_seizure-2. ... Image File history File links Pikachu_seizure-2. ... -1... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seizures are temporary abnormal electro-physiologic phenomena of the brain, resulting in abnormal synchronization of electrical neuronal activity. ... There are over 400 episodes of the Pokémon anime. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a cultural phenomenon. ... Photosensitive epilepsy is a form of epilepsy in which seizures are triggered by visual stimuli that form patterns in time or space, such as flashing lights, bold, regular patterns, or regular moving patterns. ...


This incident is the most common focus of Pokémon-related parodies in other media, and was lampooned by The Simpsons episode "Thirty Minutes over Tokyo"[23] and the South Park episode "Chinpokomon," among others. Simpsons redirects here. ... Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo is the season finale of The Simpsons tenth season. ... South Park is an American, Emmy Award-winning[1] animated television comedy series about four fourth-grade school boys who live in the small town of South Park, Colorado. ... Chinpokomon is episode 310 of Comedy Centrals animated series South Park. ...


Cultural influence

A live action show called Pokémon Live! toured the United States in late 2000. It was based on the popular Pokémon anime, but had some continuity errors relating to it. In late 2002, it was scheduled to tour Europe, but was canceled for unknown reasons, possibly due to lack of interest. It has been suggested that Mechamew2 be merged into this article or section. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Pokémon, being a popular franchise, has undoubtedly left its mark on pop-culture. The Pokémon characters themselves have become pop-culture icons; examples include not one, but two different Pikachu balloons in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Pokémon-styled Boeing 747-400, thousands of merchandise items, and a theme park in Nagoya, Japan in 2005 and Taipei in 2006. Pokémon also appeared on the cover of Time Magazine in 1999. The Comedy Central show Drawn Together has a character named Ling-Ling which is a direct parody of Pikachu. Several other shows such as ReBoot, The Simpsons, South Park and All Grown Up! have made references and spoofs of Pokémon, among other series. Pokémon was also featured on Vh1's I Love the '90s. Popular culture, or pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of the cultural elements that prevail (at least numerically) in any given society, mainly using the more popular media, in that societys vernacular language and/or an established lingua franca. ... Pikachu ) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise—a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards, and other media created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Macys Day Parade redirects here. ... Image File history File links ANA Boeing 747-400 (JA8962), in Pokemon special colours, landing at London (Heathrow) airport. ... Virgin Atlantic Airways Boeing 747-400 Tinker Belle taxiing to the take off point at London Heathrow Airport The Boeing 747-400 is at present the only model of the Boeing 747 in production and will remain the largest commercial airliner in service until the introduction of the Airbus A380. ... Pokémon The Park 2005 Poképark was a Japanese theme park based on the Pokémon franchise. ... Nagoya Castle Nagoya (名古屋市; -shi) is the fourth largest (third largest metropolitan region) and the third most prosperous city in Japan. ... Nickname: the City of Azaleas (杜鵑花之城) Coordinates: Country Republic of China Region Northern Taiwan Capital Xinyi Dist (信義區) Mayor Hau Lung-bin Area    - City 271. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Drawn Together is an American animated television series on Comedy Central created by Dave Jeser and Matt Silverstein, and first aired on October 27, 2004. ... Ling-Ling is a fictional character in the animated series Drawn Together. ... ReBoot was a Canadian (CGI) animated series that was produced by Mainframe Entertainment, created by Gavin Blair, Ian Pearson, Phil Mitchell and John Grace, with character designed by Brendan McCarthy and Ian Gibson. ... Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo is the season finale of The Simpsons tenth season. ... Chinpokomon is episode 310 of Comedy Centrals animated series South Park. ... All Grown Up! (also known as AGU) is an animated television series based on characters from Rugrats, as older characters facing pre-teen and teen issues. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... I Love the 90s is a television mini-series originally produced by the BBC, and later for American audiences by VH1, in which various music and TV personalities reminisce about 1990s culture. ...


See also

Related topics
  • Pokémon game mechanics
  • Pokémon in other media
  • Criticism of Pokémon
Pokémon general
Pokémon (creatures)
Games
Television
Miscellaneous

It has been suggested that Shiny Pokémon be merged into this article or section. ... Pokémon , IPA //, although frequently, and even intentionally mispronounced //), is a multi-billion dollar media franchise[1] controlled by video game giant Nintendo. ... The Pokémon franchise has sparked some controversy and criticism. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... // The Pokémon games, anime, and manga have a variety of items unique to their fictional world. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Poké Ball is both a logo for the Pokémon franchise as a whole and an important object to Pokémon trainers. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a complete list of Pokémon which appear in the National Pokédex as of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. ... // Pokémon types are special attributes which determine the strengths and weaknesses of different Pokémon species. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pokemon logo This article deals with the video games. ... This is a list of all Pokémon games that are released in America and Japan. ... This article is about the card game. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... This is a list of episodes of the Pokémon animated series , Pocket Monsters). ... There are over 400 episodes of the Pokémon anime. ... Pokémon Chronicles, known in Japan as ShÅ«kan Pokemon Hōsōkyoku (週刊ポケモン放送局) (Weekly Pokemon Broadcast), is a spin-off series of the Pokémon anime, revolving around characters other than Ash. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy a proposed guideline for notability (see Wikipedia:Notability (software)). If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources. ... Pikachu Meets the Press: A Pokémon Newspaper Strip Collection is a series of newspaper-style manga written by Gerard Jones and illustrated by Ashura Benimaru. ...

External links

Pokémon Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Look up Pokémon in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that French Wiktionary be merged into this article or section. ...

References

Books
  • Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Duke University Press., February, 2004. ISBN 0-8223-3287-6.
Notes
  1. ^ Boyes, Emma (2007-01-10). UK paper names top game franchises. GameSpot. GameSpot UK. Retrieved on February 26, 2007.
  2. ^ Behrens, Matt (2006-12-01). Nintendo sales through end of November revealed. N-Sider. N-Sider Media. Retrieved on December 1, 2006.
  3. ^ Swider, Matt. The Pokemon Series Pokedex @ Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Gaming Target. Retrieved on February 28, 2007.
  4. ^ "Pokemon USA Moves Licensing In-House," Gamasutra.
  5. ^ "The Ultimate Game Freak: Interview with Satoshi Tajiri," TimeAsia (Waybacked).
  6. ^ MacDonald, Mark; Brokaw, Brian; Arnold; J. Douglas; Elies, Mark. Pokémon Trainer's Guide. Sandwich Islands Publishing, 1999. ISBN 0-439-15404-9. (pg73)
  7. ^ "Pokemon Green Info on GameFAQs" gamefaqs.com URL Accessed February 23, 2007
  8. ^ Super Smash Bros. Product Information .ASIN B00000J2W7. Accessed April 19, 2006.
  9. ^ Super Smash Bros. Melee Unlockable character guide Nintendo.com. URL Accessed April 19, 2006.
  10. ^ "New Pokémon to Make Diamond-and-Pearl-Studded Debut" URL Accessed February 7, 2007.
  11. ^ "Cubed3 Pokémon Battle Revolution Confirmed for Wii" Cubed3.com. URL Accessed June 7, 2006.
  12. ^ Super Smash Bros. Brawl screenshot gallery Ign.com. URL Accessed May 11, 2006.
  13. ^ Pokémon Ruby review (page 1) Gamespy.com. URL Accessed May 30, 2006.
  14. ^ Pokémon Yellow Critical Review Ign.com. URL accessed on March 27, 2006.
  15. ^ a b Pokémon anime overview Psypokes.com. URL Accessed May 25, 2006.
  16. ^ Pokémon 10th Anniversary, Vol. 1 - Pikachu, Viz Video., June 6, 2006. ASIN B000F4PDE4.
  17. ^ Pokémon Trading Card Game "How to play" guide Pokemon-tcg.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
  18. ^ a b Pokemon Trading Card Game News; "Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire TCG Releases" Wizards.com. URL Accessed July 3, 2006.
  19. ^ "Hands on with DS' Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team," Pocket Gamer. Review dated June 13, 2006. URL last accessed February 23, 2007.
  20. ^ "Pokémon: The First Movie Parental Review," Screen It!. URL last accessed April 21, 2006.
  21. ^ "Pidgeotto Pokédex information," DLTK-Kids. URL last accessed April 21, 2006.
  22. ^ Pokemon packs a punch URL accessed January 7, 2007.
  23. ^ "Color Changes in TV Cartoons Cause Seizures," ScienceDaily (Waybacked, Style Sheet(s) missing).
Pokémon Media
Video games | Anime | Manga | TCG

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... Asin is a Pinoy rock and folk rock band from the Philippines. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (132nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Asin is a Pinoy rock and folk rock band from the Philippines. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... In computing, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a stylesheet language used to describe the presentation of a document written in a markup language. ... Pokemon logo This article deals with the video games. ... Original run Original Series: April 1, 1997 – November 14, 2002 September 8, 1998 – October 25, 2003 Advanced Generation: November 21, 2002 – September 14, 2006 November 1, 2003 – March 3, 2007 Diamond & Pearl: September 28, 2006 – April 20, 2007 – No. ... The Pokémon games are strategy games with a small RPG element which allow players to catch, collect, and train pets with various abilities, and battle them against each other to build their strength and evolve them into more powerful Pokémon. ... This article is about the card game. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Zbtb7 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (219 words)
Zbtb7, originally named Pokemon, is a gene that may act as a master switch for cancer.
The leader of the research team which discovered this, geneticist Pier Paolo Pandolfi from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City, said the gene is unique in that it is needed for other oncogenes to cause cancer.
The original name, Pokemon, stands for "POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor" and is most likely a backronym of the Japanese video game, television, and card game series Pokémon.
Pokemon Cartoon Character information: pokemon history, movies, games and more from Character Products (742 words)
Originally released in Japan, Pokemon are a class of unique little Pocket Monsters that battle each other when instructed to do so by their trainer.
The successful end to a Pokemon match occurs when one of the battling monsters faints and is rushed to a Pokemon Center for recovery, or when it is captured by a trainer and put in a ball called the Poke Ball.
Pokemon continues to be an outstanding entertainment and retail property in today’s international market.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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