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Encyclopedia > Poets' Corner
Poets corner
Poets corner

Poets' Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there. Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey. ... Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey. ... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... A poet is some one who writes poetry. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ...


The first person to be interred there was Geoffrey Chaucer, whose burial in the abbey owed more to his position as Clerk of Works of the Palace of Westminster than to his fame as a writer. However, the erection of a magnificent tomb by Nicholas Brigham to Chaucer in the middle of the sixteenth century and the nearby burial of Edmund Spenser in 1599 started a tradition that is still upheld, although the area also houses the tombs of several Canons and Deans of the abbey. Also buried here is Thomas Parr, who it is said died at the age of 152 in 1635 after having seen ten sovereigns on the throne. Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902. ... The Palace of Westminster, known also as the Houses of Parliament, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. ... Edmund Spenser Edmund Spenser (c. ... Events The Jesuit educational plan known as the Ratio Studiorum is issued (January 8). ... Thomas Parr was an English man who supposedly lived for 152 years, often referred to simply as Old Parr, or Old Tom Parr. He was said to have been born in 1483 near Shrewsbury, possibly at Winnington, and joined the army around 1500. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ...


Burial or commemoration in the Abbey did not always occur at or soon after the time of death. Lord Byron, for example, whose poetry was admired but maintained a scandalous lifesytle, died in 1824 but was not given a memorial until 1969. Even William Shakespeare, buried at Stratford-upon-Avon in 1616, was not honored with a monument until 1740 when one designed by William Kent was constructed in Poets' Corner. Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Stratford-upon-Avon Stratford-upon-Avon is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... Events October 25 — Dirk Hartog makes the second recorded landfall by a European on Australian soil, at an island off the Western Australian coast Pocahontas arrives in England War between Venice and Austria Collegium Musicum founded in Prague Nicolaus Copernicus De revolutionibus is placed on the Index of Forbidden Books... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... William Kent William Kent (born in Bridlington, Yorkshire, c. ...


Not all poets appreciated memorialisation and Samuel Wesley's epitaph for Samuel Butler, who supposedly died in poverty, continued Butler's satiric tone: Samuel Wesley (1662 - 1735) is now known as the father of a great religious leader, John Wesley; in his own time he was known to many as a poet and a writer of controversial prose. ... Samuel Butler Samuel Butler (4 December 1612–18 June 1680) was born in Strensham, Worcestershire and baptised 14 February 1613. ...

While Butler, needy wretch, was yet alive,
No generous patron would a dinner give;
See him, when starv'd to death, and turn'd to dust,
Presented with a monumental bust.
The poet's fate is here in emblem shown,
He ask'd for bread, and he received a stone.

People buried in Poets' Corner

Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Robert Browning Robert Browning (May 7, 1812 – December 12, 1889) was an English poet and playwright. ... William Camden William Camden (May 2, 1551 - November 9, 1623) was an English antiquarian and historian. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902. ... William Congreve (January 24, 1670 – January 19, 1729) was an English playwright and poet. ... Abraham Cowley (1618 - July 28, 1667), English poet, was born in the city of London late in 1618. ... William Davenant Sir William Davenant (February 28, 1606 - April 7, 1668), also spelled DAvenant, was an English poet and playwright. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Canon Adam Fox (1883–1977) was the Dean of Divinity at C.S. Lewiss Magdalen College, Oxford. ... John Dryden John Dryden (August 9, 1631 – May 12, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, and playwright who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known as the Age of Dryden. ... Portrait of David Garrick David Garrick (February 19, 1717 – January 20, 1779) was an English actor, dramatist, theatrical producer and theatrical manager, and a friend and pupil of Samuel Johnson. ... John Gay John Gay (30 June 1685 - 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist. ... George Frideric Handel (German Georg Friedrich Händel), (February 23, 1685 – April 14, 1759) was a German-born British Baroque music composer. ... Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was a novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... Samuel Johnson circa 1772, painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds. ... Rudyard Kipling Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30, 1865 – January 18, 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India. ... Quotes His imagination resembled the wings of an ostrich. ... John Edward Masefield, OM, (1 June 1878 – 12 May 1967), was an English poet and writer, and Poet Laureate from 1930 until his death in 1967. ... Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Oscar winning English actor and director, regarded by many critics as the greatest actor of the 20th century. ... Thomas Parr was an English man who supposedly lived for 152 years, often referred to simply as Old Parr, or Old Tom Parr. He was said to have been born in 1483 near Shrewsbury, possibly at Winnington, and joined the army around 1500. ... Matthew Prior (July 21, 1664 – September 18, 1721) was an English poet and diplomat. ... Richard Brinsley Sheridan Richard Brinsley Sheridan (October 30, 1751 – July 7, 1816) was an Irish playwright and Whig statesman. ... Edmund Spenser Edmund Spenser (c. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...

People commemorated with memorials in Poets' Corner


  Results from FactBites:
 
Poets' Corner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (296 words)
Poets' Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey due to the number of poets, playwrights and writers now buried and commemorated there.
The first person to be interred there was Geoffrey Chaucer, whose burial in the abbey owed more to his position as Clerk of Works of the Palace of Westminster than to his fame as a writer.
Even William Shakespeare, buried at Stratford-upon-Avon in 1616, was not honored with a monument until 1740 when one designed by William Kent was constructed in Poets' Corner.
Westminster Abbey - Abbey Tour - Poets' Corner (637 words)
It was not originally designated as the burial place of writers, playwrights and poets; the first poet to be buried here, Geoffrey Chaucer, was laid to rest in Westminster Abbey because he had been Clerk of Works to the palace of Westminster, not because he had written the Canterbury Tales.
Other poets and writers, well known in their day, have now vanished into obscurity, with only their monuments to show that they were once famous.
As a writer who drew attention to the hardships born by the socially deprived and who advocated the abolition of the slave trade, he won enduring fame and gratitude and today, more than 110 years later, a wreath is still laid on his tomb on the anniversary of his death each year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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