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Encyclopedia > Podium

A podium is a platform that is used to raise something to a short distance above its surroundings. In architecture a building can rest on a large podium. Podiums can also be used to raise people, for instance the conductor of an orchestra stands on a podium as do many public speakers. Additionally, podium has commonly come to mean the object a speaker stands behind, even when it is at floor level, though the proper term for that item is a lectern. The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Public speaking is speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ... A late 18th century pulpit in a small Roman Catholic church in Spielfeld, Styria, Austria A pulpit (from Latin pulpitum scaffold, platform, stage) is a small elevated platform where a member of the clergy stands in order to read the Gospel lesson and deliver a sermon. ...


One common type of podium is that used to honour medalists in sporting events such as the Olympics. In the Olympics a three level podium is used, the highest level in the centre holds the gold medalist, to their right is a somewhat lower one for the silver medalist. To the left of the gold medalist is an even lower platform for the bronze medalist. Some sports, most notably rowing shun podiums, and the symbolism they represent. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ...


Podiums are used in motorsport, where the first three finishers will usually stand on one at the end of the race to receive trophies. Notable exceptions are the Monaco Grand Prix and the Indianapolis 500 races which have different historic customs. Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Some trophies seen in the London Irish clubhouse at Sunbury in 2002. ... The Monaco Grand Prix (Grand Prix de Monaco) is a Formula One race held on the streets of the Principality of Monaco. ... Indianapolis 500, 1994 An Indianapolis 500 racecar depicted on the Indiana state quarter The Indianapolis 500-Mile Race, often shortened to Indianapolis 500 or Indy 500, is an American automobile race, held annually over the Memorial Day weekend at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. ...


First Use of Podiums at Olympics

According to Professor Emeritus Robert K. Barney, the University of Western Ontario's founding director of Western's International Centre for Olympic Studies, the idea of having winning athletes mount a podium while they received their medals, is a Canadian idea born in Hamilton, Ontario in 1930. The University of Western Ontario (Western or UWO) is a coeducational, non-denominational, research-intensive university located in London, Ontario. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Nickname: Ambitious City, Steeltown, The Hammer Area: 1,117. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ...


Professor Barney's 25-page research paper in the International Journal of Olympic Studies indicates that podiums were first used at the 1930 British Empire Games (now Commonwealth Games) in Hamilton and were subsequently used during the 1932 Olympics Summer Games in Los Angeles and Winter Games in Lake Placid. Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries The Commonwealth Games is a multi-sport event held every four years involving the elite athletes of the Commonwealth of Nations. ...


See also

The President of the United States uses several podiums. ...

External links

  • Podiums first used in modern Olympics

  Results from FactBites:
 
Podium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (188 words)
Podiums can also be used to raise people, for instance the conductor of an orchestra stands on a podium as do many public speakers.
One common type of podium is that used to honour medallists in sporting events such as the Olympics.
Some sports, most notably rowing shun podiums, and the symbolism they represent.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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