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Encyclopedia > Plymouth
Plymouth


View of Plymouth Hoe Waterfront Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... Plymouth is a city in the southwest of England. ...

Population 246,100 (2005 est.)
OS grid reference SX475538
Unitary authority Plymouth
Ceremonial county Devon
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PLYMOUTH
Postcode district PL1-9
Dialling code 01752
Police Devon and Cornwall
Fire Devon and Somerset
Ambulance South Western
European Parliament South West England
UK Parliament Plymouth Sutton
Plymouth Devonport
South West Devon
Website: www.plymouth.gov.uk
List of places: UKEnglandDevon

Plymouth (ˈplɪməθ ) is a city and unitary authority in Devon, England, about 190 miles (310 km) south west of London. It is built between the mouths of the river Plym and Tamar, where they form the Plymouth Sound. Since 1967 the unitary authority of Plymouth includes the suburbs of Plympton and Plymstock, which are on the other side of the Plym. The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the region. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The PL postcode area, also known as the Plymouth postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Bodmin, Boscastle, Callington, Calstock, Camelford, Delabole, Fowey, Gunnislake, Ivybridge, Launceston, Lifton, Liskeard, Looe, Lostwithiel, Padstow, Par, Plymouth, Port Isaac, Saltash, St Austell, Tavistock, Tintagel, Torpoint, Wadebridge and Yelverton in England. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service or FRS covering the counties of Somerset and Devon, including the unitary authorities of Plymouth and Torbay, in the south west of England Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service was founded on 1 April 2007... The South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SWAST) is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Plymouth Sutton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Plymouth Devonport is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... South West Devon is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of settlements in Devon, England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The River Plym is a small river in Devon, England. ... The Tamar is a river in south western England, that forms most of the border between Devon (to the east) and Cornwall (to the west). ... Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ... Plymstock is a parish and a suburb of Plymouth, England. ... The River Plym is a small river in Devon, England. ...


Plymouth’s history goes back to the Bronze Age, where its first settlement at Mount Batten grew. It continued to grow as a trading post for the Roman Empire, until the more prosperous settlement of Sutton, the current Plymouth, surpassed it. In 1620 the Pilgrim Fathers set sail for the New World from Plymouth, thereby establishing the modern English-speaking constitution of the United States of America. About 25 years later the town was besieged between 1642 1646, during the English Civil War, by the Parliamentarians. Throughout the Industrial Revolution Plymouth grew as a major shipping industry, including imports and passengers from the USA and the construction of Ships, ranging from small fishing boats to Battleships for the Royal Navy. This later lead to its partial destruction, during World War Two, known as the Plymouth Blitz. After the war was over, the City Centre was completely rebuilt. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Mount Batten is a 24-metre-tall outcrop of rock on a 600-metre peninsula at Plymouth Sound in England. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the colonists of North America. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This article is about a battleship as a type of warship. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... This article is becoming very long. ... During World War II, the Luftwaffe launched the Blitz, a night-bombing campaign of British towns. ...


Today the City is home to nearly 250,000 people, making it the 25th most populous city in England. It has its own city council and is represented nationally by three MPs. Plymouth’s economy is still strongly influenced by shipbuilding, but, has over the past decade, become a more service based economy with the 11th largest University in the United Kingdom. Its naval base, HMNB Devonport is the largest operational naval base in Western Europe.[1] It has its own airport with national services and international ferry links to France and Spain. Complete with a red light district in Union Street and a 20,000 capacity football team. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Devonport Dockyard in 1909, courtesy WW1 Archive Devonport Dockyard and the Hamoaze from the Rame Peninsula, Cornwall Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Devonport (HMS Drake), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Clyde and HMNB Portsmouth). ... Union Street in Plymouth, Devon, is a long street connecting the city centre to Devonport, Plymouths naval base and docks. ...

Contents

History

A sketch of Plymouth circa. 1600
A sketch of Plymouth circa. 1600
A map of HMNB Devonport in 1909, showings its basins, docks and wharfs
Main article: History of Plymouth

Plymouth’s name is made up of Old English and Modern English. The name has two parts: Plym and mouth. The name Plym is thought to have its origin as an Old English word for plum tree. Plympton, a suburb of Plymouth, was the first place to use the word Plym in its name. Ton meaning town, which forms the word Plympton meaning Plum Tree Town. At some point between the naming of Plympton and of Plymouth, the river, which flows from Dartmoor into the English Channel at Plymouth, was called the River Plym, as a result of Plympton. The earliest settlement of Plymouth was located right at the edge of the Plym Estuary where the River Plym joins the sea. These areas are commonly referred to as the "Mouth of the river". Combining the two words Plym and mouth produces the word Plymouth meaning literally Plum Tree Mouth or in long form Mouth of the Plum Tree River.[2] Download high resolution version (716x1139, 194 KB)Devonport Dockyard in 1909, large size original source image, used in copyright history of the derived images. ... Download high resolution version (716x1139, 194 KB)Devonport Dockyard in 1909, large size original source image, used in copyright history of the derived images. ... Devonport Dockyard in 1909, courtesy WW1 Archive Devonport Dockyard and the Hamoaze from the Rame Peninsula, Cornwall Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Devonport (HMS Drake), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Clyde and HMNB Portsmouth). ... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... The River Plym is a small river in Devon, England. ... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The River Plym is a small river in Devon, England. ...


Early history

The earliest human remains in the Plymouth area are from a number of caves around Plymouth Sound. The bone caves, located at Cattedown, Oreston, Turnchapel and Stonehouse contain extensive Upper Palaeolithic deposits including those of Homo sapien, some of the earliest such evidence in England. This is one of the most important discoveries ever documented about the history of "anatomically-modern humans" or Homo sapiens in Europe. There is currently no evidence of Homo neanderthalensis ever having been found in caves at Cattedown, Oreston, Stonehouse or Mount Batten (Turnchapel). [3] Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ... Oreston, formerly a village on the shore of the Cattewater, is now a suburb of Plymouth. ... Stonehouse is the name of two places in England. ... The Upper Paleolithic or Palaeolithic is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... This article is about modern humans. ... For other uses, see Neanderthal (disambiguation). ... Mount Batten is a 24-metre-tall outcrop of rock on a 600-metre peninsula at Plymouth Sound in England. ...


The earliest known settlement in the area now occupied by Plymouth is at Mount Batten. It dates from the late Bronze Age, and was later an Iron Age trading port.[4] As part of the Roman Empire this port traded tin along with cattle and hides, but was later overshadowed by the rise of the fishing village of Sutton opposite, whose name means south town. Mount Batten is a 24-metre-tall outcrop of rock on a 600-metre peninsula at Plymouth Sound in England. ... Extent of the Beaker culture In Great Britain, the Bronze Age is considered to have been the period from around 2700 to 700 BC. Periodization late neolithic: Meldon Bridge Period EBA (2700-1500) 2700 BC - 2000 BC: Mount Pleasant Phase, Early Beaker culture: Ireland: copper+arsenic, flat axes, halberds; Britain... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


In 1403, the town was briefly occupied and burned by Bretons. The town was often the target of enemies across the English Channel, especially during the Hundred Years' War. A series of fortifications were built in the Tudor and Elizabethan era which include the four round towers featured on the city coat of arms; the remains of two of these can still be found at Mount Batten and at Sutton Pool below the Royal Citadel. The Bretons are a distinct celtic ethnic group located in the region of Brittany in France. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... Belligerents House of Valois Castile Scotland Genoa Majorca Bohemia Crown of Aragon Brittany House of Plantagenet Burgundy Brittany Portugal Navarre Flanders Hainaut Aquitaine Luxembourg Holy Roman Empire The Hundred Years War (French: Guerre de Cent Ans) was a prolonged conflict between two royal houses for the French throne, vacant with... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Mount Batten is a 24-metre-tall outcrop of rock on a 600-metre peninsula at Plymouth Sound in England. ...


Renaissance Age

During the 16th century, Plymouth was the home port for a number of successful maritime traders, among them William Hawkins, who made the first English expeditions to West Africa in the 1530s; and his son Sir John Hawkins, who led England's first foray into the slave trade.[5] Plymouth Hoe, meaning high place, is a wide grass meadow atop cliffs overlooking the natural harbour of Plymouth Sound. According to an enduring national myth, this is the place where Sir Francis Drake insisted on completing his game of bowls to allow wind and tide to change in his favour enabling his defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588. Sir John Hawkins (1532 - November 12, 1595) was an English navigator. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Plymouth Hoe from Mountbatten Plymouth Hoe, referred to locally as the Hoe, is a large public space in the English port city of Plymouth. ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... For other uses, see Bowl (disambiguation). ... Belligerents Kingdom of England Dutch Republic Spain Kingdom of Portugal Commanders Elizabeth I of England Charles Howard Francis Drake Philip II of Spain Duke of Medina Sidonia Strength 34 warships 163 armed merchant vessels 30 Dutch flyboats 22 galleons 108 armed merchant vessels Casualties and losses 50–100 dead[1...


In 1620 the Pilgrim Fathers set sail for the New World from Plymouth, thereby establishing the modern English-speaking constitution of the United States of America. On sighting land, they christened their first point of contact on the western Atlantic shore Plymouth Rock in gratitude for the hospitality they had received whilst wintering in Plymouth. Their settlement of Plymouth, Massachusetts also bears the name of its European forebear. Twin flags of the US and UK now fly at the Mayflower Steps to commemorate the significance of this event to both nations. This article is about the colonists of North America. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Plymouth Rock, described by some as the most disappointing landmark in America because of its small size and poor visitor access. ... United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


Civil War and Restoration

During the English Civil War Plymouth sided with the Parliamentarians and so was isolated from the surrounding regions of Devon and Cornwall which were held by Royalist sympathisers. The town was besieged for almost four years until the Royalists were defeated. Various skirmishes and confrontations occurred, including the battle of St Budeaux and the rout of Royalist cavalry along Lipson Ridge. Freedom Fields Park still commemorates the latter site. Construction of the Royal Citadel began in 1665, after the Restoration; it was armed with cannon facing both out to sea and into the town, rumoured to be a reminder to residents not to oppose the Crown. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... Prince Rupert of the Rhine Cavaliers was the name used by Parliamentarians for the Royalist supporters of King Charles I during the English Civil War (1642–1651). ... The Royal Citadel at night The Royal Citadel of Plymouth was built in the late 1660s, overlooking the Plymouth Sound, on the site of the earlier Plymouth Fort that had been built in the time of Sir Francis Drake. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... This article refers to the Commonwealths concept of the monarchys legal authority. ...


Nineteenth century

A map of the "three towns": Devonport, Stonehouse and Plymouth in 1888
A map of the "three towns": Devonport, Stonehouse and Plymouth in 1888

After his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte was brought to Plymouth aboard HMS Bellerophon which remained in Plymouth Sound for two weeks before his exile to St Helena. The Three Towns enjoyed some prosperity during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century and were enriched by a series of neo-classical urban developments designed by London architect John Foulston.[6] Foulston was important for the town and was responsible for several grand public buildings, many now destroyed, including the Athenaeum, the Theatre Royal and Royal Hotel, and much of Union Street.[6] Devonport, in Devon, was formerly called Plymouth Dock. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français... Napoleon Bonaparte on board the Bellerophon in Plymouth Sound by Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, painted 1815. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Three Towns is the term often used to refer to the neighbouring Devon towns of Plymouth, Devonport and East Stonehouse, which were formally merged in 1914 to become the Borough of Plymouth. ... Union Street in Plymouth, Devon, is a long street connecting the city centre to Devonport, Plymouths naval base and docks. ...

Twentieth Century

Union Street before World War II showing trams
Union Street before World War II showing trams
The debris scattered on the ground after an air attack by the Germans in 1941

Until World War II, the port at Millbay Docks was used for Transatlantic liner shipping, as it had been since the 1870s. Many of the surviving crew of the RMS Titanic disaster disembarked at Millbay docks on their return to England in 1912.[7] Due to its strategic proximity to the northern coast of France and its naval preeminence, the city was heavily bombed by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War, which is known as the Plymouth Blitz. Although the dockyards were the principal targets, the two main shopping centres, most of the civic buildings and over 3,700 houses were completely destroyed and more than 1,000 civilians lost their lives.[8] Charles Church has been left in its ruined state as a memorial to those civilians who died and on the Hoe stands a memorial to the many members of the Royal Navy from Plymouth who were killed in both World Wars.[9] In June 1944 Plymouth was one of the principal staging posts for the Normandy landings. General Omar Bradley and the 1st US Army embarked here for the landings at Omaha Beach and Utah Beach and after the initial bombardments some of the American battleships came to the dockyard for repair.[8] Union Street in Plymouth, Devon, is a long street connecting the city centre to Devonport, Plymouths naval base and docks. ... Millbay, also known as Millbay Docks is currently a run-down area of dockland in Plymouth extending from West Hoe in the east to Mutton Cove. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ...   (German IPA: ) is a generic German term for an air force. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... During World War II, the Luftwaffe launched the Blitz, a night-bombing campaign of British towns. ... Charles Church is the second most ancient Parish Church in Plymouth, Devon the senior Church being St Andrews Church, the Mother Church of Plymouth. ... Plymouth Hoe from Mountbatten Plymouth Hoe, referred to locally as the Hoe, is a large public space in the English port city of Plymouth. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the assault phase of Operation Overlord. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... The First United States Army is a field army of the United States Army. ... Combatants United States Germany Commanders Omar Bradley, Norman Cota, Clarence R. Huebner Dietrich Kraiss Strength 43,250 Unknown Casualties 3,000 1,200 Omaha Beach was the code name for one of the principal landing points of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on June... Combatants United States Germany Commanders Raymond O. Barton Theodore Roosevelt Jr U.S. 4th Infantry Division Karl-Wilhelm von Schlieben Dietrich Kraiss German 352nd Infantry Division German 709th Infantry Division Strength 32,000  ? Casualties 700 Unknown American assault troops move onto Utah Beach, carrying full equipment. ...


In 1943 Sir Patrick Abercrombie's published his Plan for Plymouth in response to the devastation inflicted upon the city. Its wide-ranging vision called for the destruction of the few remaining pre-War buildings in the City Centre and the replacement of modern buildings and a completely new layout.[10] By 1964 over 20,000 new homes had been built, more than 13,500 of them permanent council homes and 853 built by the Admiralty. Despite all this building, in 1971 over ten percent of the houses in Plymouth were still occupied by more than one family.[11] This article is about the town planner. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ...


Devonport Dockyard was kept busy for many years refitting aircraft carriers such as the Ark Royal. By the time this work ended in the late 1970s the nuclear submarine base was operational. In the 1950s a new Royal Navy Engineering College was built at Manadon, and HMS Raleigh, the current basic training facility of the Royal Navy, was opened west of Torpoint. The army had substantially left the city by 1971, with Raglan Barracks and Plumer Barracks pulled down in the 1960s.[11] However the Royal Citadel has been home to 29th Commando Regiment Royal Artillery since 1962,[11] and 42 Commando Royal Marines has been based at Bickleigh Barracks, a few miles outside Plymouth, since 1971. HMS Ark Royal (R09) was an Audacious-class aircraft carrier of the British Royal Navy and, when she was decommissioned in 1978, was the Royal Navys last remaining conventional catapult and arrested-landing supercarrier. ... HMS Raleigh is the modern-day basic training facility of the Royal Navy at Torpoint, Cornwall, England. ... Torpoint (Cornish: Penntorr) is a town in the far South East of Cornwall, United Kingdom, separated from the City of Plymouth by a stretch of water referred to as the Hamoaze, which itself is the mouth of the River Tamar. ... 29 Commando Regiment is the Commando-trained unit of the British Armys Royal Artillery. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...


Governance

Local government history

In 1914 the county boroughs of Plymouth and Devonport, and the urban district of East Stonehouse merged to form a single county borough of Plymouth. This was supported by the War Office, who were concerned that having three different local councils would complicate matters in time of war. Collectively they were referred to as "The Three Towns".[12] A provisional order was made on May 2, 1914, to come into effect in November.[13] Plymouth was granted city status in 1928.[14] The city's boundaries were extended in the mid-1930s and further expanded in 1967 to include the town of Plympton and the parish of Plymstock. County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Devonport, in Devon, was formerly called Plymouth Dock. ... In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Old War Office Building, seen from Whitehall, London - the former location of the War Office The War Office was a former department of the British Government, responsible for the administration of the British Army between the 17th century and 1963, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. ... The Three Towns is the term often used to refer to the neighbouring Devon towns of Plymouth, Devonport and East Stonehouse, which were formally merged in 1914 to become the Borough of Plymouth. ... Provisional Order is a method of procedure followed by several government departments in England, authorizing action on the part of local authorities under various acts of Parliament. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ... Plymstock is a parish and a suburb of Plymouth, England. ...


Plymouth lobbied for further boundary extensions throughout the post-war period, proposing to annex Saltash and Torpoint on the other side of the Tamar to the Local Government Boundary Commission. The 1971 Local Government White Paper proposed abolishing county boroughs, which would have left Plymouth, a town of 250,000 people, being administered from a council based at the smaller Exeter, on the other side of the county. This led to Plymouth lobbying for the creation of a Tamarside county, to include Plymouth, Torpoint, Saltash, and the rural hinterland. The campaign was not successful, and Plymouth ceased to be a county borough on 1 April 1974 with responsibility for education, social services, highways and libraries transferred to Devon County Council. All powers returned when the city become a unitary authority on 1 April 1998 under recommendations of the Banham Commission. Location within the British Isles Saltash (Cornish: Essa) is a town in Cornwall, UK. It has a population of about 16,000. ... Torpoint (Cornish: Penntorr) is a town in the far South East of Cornwall, United Kingdom, separated from the City of Plymouth by a stretch of water referred to as the Hamoaze, which itself is the mouth of the River Tamar. ... The Tamar is a river in south western England, that forms most of the border between Devon (to the east) and Cornwall (to the west). ... The Local Government Boundary Commission was established in 1945 to review the boundaries of local authority areas in England and Wales outside the Counties of London and Middlesex. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... Torpoint (Cornish: Penntorr) is a town in the far South East of Cornwall, United Kingdom, separated from the City of Plymouth by a stretch of water referred to as the Hamoaze, which itself is the mouth of the River Tamar. ... Location within the British Isles Saltash (Cornish: Essa) is a town in Cornwall, UK. It has a population of about 16,000. ... The meaning of hinterland and its history. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Map showing counties and unitary authorities from 1998. ...


City Council

The City Council's motto: Latin Turris fortissima est nomen Jehova (English: The Name of Jehovah is the Strongest Tower
The City Council's motto: Latin Turris fortissima est nomen Jehova (English: The Name of Jehovah is the Strongest Tower
The controversial civic centre building behind the Royal Theatre car park
The controversial civic centre building behind the Royal Theatre car park

The City of Plymouth is divided into 20 wards, 17 of which elect three councillors and the other three electing two councillors, making up a total council of 57.[15] Councillors are also known as Members of the Council and usually stand for election as members of national political parties. Full local elections are held every four years with elections for one third of Council seats being held each intervening year; the total electorate for Plymouth was 184,956 in December 2003. The local election of May 2006 resulted in a political composition of 26 Labour and 31 Conservative councillors. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... In politics, an electorate is the group of people entitled to vote in an election. ... Local government elections took place in England (only) on Thursday May 4, 2006. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Council sessions have a Chairman and Vice-Chairman, who are entitled Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor respectively. The Lord Mayor also has a ceremonial role and historical regalia. The Leader of the Council has day to day power which is exercised as Chairman of the Cabinet and there is a leader of each political group. The Civic Centre municipal office building in Armada Way became a listed building in June 2007 because of its quality and period features,[16] but has become the centre of a controversy as the council disagrees.[17] In September 2007 the city council announced its application to demolish the site. Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ...


The Lord Mayor is elected annually in May;[18] as at May 2008 Brian Vincent holds the position for the Labour Party.[19] The dignity of Lord Mayor was granted in 1935, previously the office was simply Mayor – there have been over 540 holders of the office since its establishment in 1439. The Lord Mayor's official residence is 3 Elliot Terrace, located on the Hoe. Once a home of Waldorf and Nancy Astor, it was given by Lady Astor to the City of Plymouth as an official residence for future Lord Mayors and is also used today for civic hospitality, as lodgings for visiting dignitaries and High Court judges.[20] The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... // An official residence is the residence at which heads of state, heads of government, gubernatorial or other senior figures officially reside. ... Plymouth Hoe from Mountbatten Plymouth Hoe, referred to locally as the Hoe, is a large public space in the English port city of Plymouth. ... Waldorf Astor, 2nd Viscount Astor Waldorf Astor, 2nd Viscount Astor (May 19, 1879–September 30, 1952) was a businessman and politician and a member of the prominent Astor family. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopaedia entry. ...


In Parliament, Plymouth is represented by the three constituencies of Plymouth Devonport, Plymouth Sutton and Southwest Devon. As of the 2005 General Election the two former constituencies are held by Labour MPs Alison Seabeck and Linda Gilroy respectively with the latter held by Conservative MP Gary Streeter. The city is part of South West England and Gibraltar in the European parliament. Plymouth, Devonport is a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Plymouth Sutton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Devon South West is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... Alison Jane Seabeck (born January 20, 1954) is the Labour MP for Plymouth Devonport. ... Linda Wade Gilroy (born July 19, 1949, Moffat, Scotland as Linda Wade Jarvie) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... Gary Nicholas Streeter (born 2 October 1955) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Plymouth City Council is formally twinned with:[21]

The city also maintains a link with: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Brest. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Gdynia (IPA: , German: (until 1939 and after 1945) / Gotenhafen (1939-1945); Kashubian: ) is a city in the Pomeranian Voivodeship of Poland and an important seaport at GdaÅ„sk Bay on the south coast of the Baltic Sea. ... Capital city GdaÅ„sk Area 18,293 km² Population (2004)  - Density 2,192,000 120/km² Powiats  - Urban counties  - Land counties 4 16 Communes 123 Logo of Pomeranian Voivodeship Sea port in GdaÅ„sk The Sea Towers in Gdynia will be the tallest building (138 m) in Poland outside Warsaw... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Novorossiysk (Russian Новороссийск) is a city in southern Russia, one of the main Russian ports on the Black Sea, in Krasnodar Krai. ... Krasnodar Krai (Russian: , Krasnodarsky kray) is a federal subject of Russia (a krai), located in the Southern Federal District. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Image:Donostia (San Sebastian), Euskadi location. ... Pays Basque) see Northern Basque Country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

and has educational and economic links with: Image File history File links Flag_of_Ghana. ... Sekondi-Takoradi, population 335,000 (2005), is the capital of the Western Region of Ghana. ... The Western Region of Ghana includes the large cities of Sekondi and Takoradi on the coast, coastal Axim and a hilly inland area including Elubo, that reaches from the Côte dIvoire border in the west, to the Central Region (Ghana) in the east. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Jiaxing (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles:Chia-hsing; Postal map spelling: Kashing) is a prefecture-level city in northern Zhejiang province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Zhejiang (Chinese: 浙江; pinyin: Zhèjiāng; Wade-Giles: Che-chiang; Postal System Pinyin: Chehkiang or Chekiang) is a eastern coastal province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

Geography

See also: Places in Plymouth
View of Plymouth Sound with Drake's Island in the centre
View of Plymouth Sound with Drake's Island in the centre
Climate chart for Plymouth[22]
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Plymouth lies between the River Plym to the east and the River Tamar to the west; both rivers flow into the natural harbour of Plymouth Sound. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary forms the Hamoaze on which is sited Devonport Dockyard. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, built in 1812. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is easily seen from Plymouth Hoe, a large public area on top of low limestone cliffs. The Unitary Authority of Plymouth is 79.78 square kilometres (30.80 sq mi)[23] Here is a list of places and landmarks located within the city of Plymouth, England. ... Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ... Drakes Island as seen from Plymouth Hoe. ... The River Plym is a small river in Devon, England. ... The Tamar is a river in south western England, that forms most of the border between Devon (to the east) and Cornwall (to the west). ... Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ... Devonport Dockyard and the Hamoaze from the Rame Peninsula, Cornwall The Hamoaze (IPA: in Cornish) is an estuarine stretch of water at the point where the tidal River Tamar, the River Tavy, and the River Lynher enter Plymouth Sound. ... Devonport Dockyard in 1909, courtesy WW1 Archive Devonport Dockyard and the Hamoaze from the Rame Peninsula, Cornwall Her Majestys Naval Base (HMNB) Devonport (HMS Drake), is one of three operating bases for the Royal Navy (the others being HMNB Clyde and HMNB Portsmouth). ... The construction of Plymouth Breakwater started in 1812 at the then collossal cost of £1. ... Drakes Island as seen from Plymouth Hoe. ... Plymouth Hoe from Mountbatten Plymouth Hoe, referred to locally as the Hoe, is a large public space in the English port city of Plymouth. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ...


The River Plym which flows off Dartmoor to the north east forms a smaller estuary to the east of the city; the mouth of this estuary is called Cattewater. On its south bank lies the outcrop of Mount Batten, the earliest-known settlement in the area; and on its north bank was the manor of Sutton which grew to form the present day city. High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... The city of Plymouth, Devon, England is bounded by Dartmoor to the north, the river Tamar to the west. ... Mount Batten is a 24-metre-tall outcrop of rock on a 600-metre peninsula at Plymouth Sound in England. ...


Plymouth is home to Plymouth Marine Laboratory, an independent collaborative centre, who study the area for scientific research. They study the marine ecosystems in and near Plymouth to provide future solutions for marine extinctions across the United Kingdom. Plymouth Marine Laboratory (sometimes referred to as as PML) in Plymouth, England is an independent collaborative centre of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). ...


In 1945 Sir Patrick Abercrombie's 1943 Plan for Plymouth was published to rebuild the city. It called for the destruction of the few remaining pre-War buildings in the city centre and their replacement with wide, modern boulevards aligned east-west linked by a grand north-south avenue (Armada Way) linking the railway station with Plymouth Hoe.[24] The Plan had to deal not only with the effects of the War, but also the pre-war defects of the city: much of the housing and many narrow streets were overcrowded. The main concern was for housing, and many prefabs were built by 1946, followed by over a thousand permanent council houses built each year from 1951–1957. By 1964 over 20,000 new homes had been built, more than 13,500 of them permanent council homes and 853 built by the Admiralty. To compensate for the large scale of housing Plymouth has a number of public parks, the largest of which is Central Park. Other sizeable green spaces include Victoria Park, Freedom Fields Park, Alexandra Park, and significantly, the Hoe. This article is about the town planner. ... Boulevard has two generally accepted meanings. ... The French word avenue can mean or refer to any of the following : Most commonly, it refers to two parallel lines of trees specially planted as a landscape feature. ... Prefabrication is the practice of manufacturing the parts of an assembly in one location, ready for them to be assembled in another place. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... Plymouths Central Park is a large centralised park situated to the north of Plymouth city centre, stretching north from the train station to Pounds House, Peverell and west from Ford Park Cemetery to the A386 (Outland Road and Alma Road). ... Victoria Park, showing flooding from the underground culverts in June 2005 Victoria Park in Millbridge in Plymouth is a small recreational area. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Before the 19th century two leats were built in order to provide drinking water for the town. They carried water from Dartmoor all the way down to Plymouth. Drake's Leat also known as Plymouth Leat, was a watercourse constructed to tap the River Meavy. It was one of the first municipal water supplies in the country. The Devonport Leat was constructed in the 1790s to carry fresh drinking water to the expanding dockyards at Devonport. It is fed by three Dartmoor rivers: The West Dart, The Cowsic and The Blackabrook. It was originally designed to carry water all the way to Devonport Dockyard but has since been shortened and now carries water to Burrator Reservoir which feeds most of the water supply of Plymouth. Dartmoor granite was used to construct the water channel, as well as a small aqueduct and a tunnel. A leat (occasionally and archaically spelt lete) is a name, particularly common in the south-west of England for a man-made watercourse, or a makeshift aqueduct. ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... Drakes Leat Drakes Leat, also known as Plymouth Leat, was a watercourse constructed in the late 16th century to tap the River Meavy on Dartmoor, England in order to supply Plymouth with water. ... Meavy is a river in the Dartmoor moors in Devon in south-west England. ... The Devonport leat was constructed in the 1790s to carry water from Dartmoor to the expanding dockyards at Devonport, Devon. ... Events and Trends French Revolution (1789 - 1799). ... Devonport, in Devon, was formerly called Plymouth Dock. ... The River Dart The River Dart is a river in Devon, UK. The river rises on Dartmoor, as two separate branches (the East Dart and West Dart), which join at Dartmeet. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ...


Climate

Along with the rest of South West England, Plymouth has a temperate climate which is generally wetter and milder than the rest of England. The annual mean temperature is approximately 11 °C (52 °F) and shows a seasonal and a diurnal variation, but due to the modifying effect of the sea the range is less than in most other parts of the UK.[25] February is the coldest month with mean minimum temperatures between 3 °C (37 °F) and 4 °C (39 °F). July and August are the warmest months with mean daily maxima over 19 °C (66 °F).[22] This article is about the region. ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Diurnal motion is an astronomical term referring to the apparent daily motion of stars in orbit around the Earth, caused by the Earths rotation around its axis. ...


South West England has a favoured location with respect to the Azores high pressure when it extends its influence north-eastwards towards the UK, particularly in summer. Coastal areas have average annual sunshine totals over 1,600 hours.[25] Motto:  (Portuguese for Rather die free than in peace subjugated) Anthem:  (national)  (local) Capital Ponta Delgada1 Angra do Heroísmo2 Horta3 Largest city Ponta Delgada Official languages Portuguese Ethnic groups  Portuguese Government Autonomous region  -  President Carlos César Establishment  -  Settled 1439   -  Autonomy 1976  Area  -  Total 2,346 km² (n/a...


Rainfall tends to be associated with Atlantic depressions or with convection. The Atlantic depressions are more vigorous in autumn and winter and most of the rain which falls in those seasons in the south-west is from this source. Average annual rainfall is around 980 millimetres (39 in). The number of days with snow falling is typically less than ten per winter. November to March have the highest mean wind speeds, with June to August having the lightest winds. The predominant wind direction is from the south-west.[25] A large low-pressure system swirls off the southwestern coast of Iceland, illustrating the maxim that nature abhors a vacuum. ...


Demography

In 2005, Plymouth's population was estimated at 246,100 by Plymouth City Council[26] The average household size is 2.3 persons.[27]


At the time of the 2001 UK census, the ethnic composition of Plymouth's population was 98.4% White, with the largest minority ethnic group being Chinese at 0.3%. In terms of religion, 73.6% of the population are Christian with all other religions represented by less than 0.5% each. The number of people without a religion is above the national average at 18.3%, with 7.1% not stating their religion.[28] UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


Below is a table outlining population change of the city since 1801. The population rose rapidly during the second half of the 19th century. The decline of over 1.6% from 1931 to 1951, including the period of World War II, is notable.


Economy

Tinside Pool
Tinside Pool
Cornwall Street, one of the main shopping streets
Cornwall Street, one of the main shopping streets

The economy of Plymouth has traditionally been linked to its coastal location based around fishing and the armed services, in particular the Navy and Devonport Dockyard. The long term decline of these industries has seen a greater diversification towards a service based economy based on healthcare, food and drink, chewing gum and call centres with electronics, advanced engineering and boat building still maintaining a prime role. The decline of heavy industries has had a negative effect on the city's employment figures. In the past eight years employment has risen 11%; however, employment and wages still remain significantly below the national average. Thirty thousand university students together with teaching and support staff now make higher education a powerful influence. Food is any substance, usually composed primarily of carbohydrates, fats, water and/or proteins, that can be eaten or drunk by an animal for nutrition and/or pleasure. ... Chewing gum Chewing gum is a type of confectionery designed for fun and chewing. ... A very large collections call centre in Lakeland, FL. A call centre or call center (see spelling differences) is a centralised office used for the purpose of receiving and transmitting a large volume of requests by telephone. ... Traditional boat building in South East Maluku, Indonesia. ... Heavy industry does not have a single fixed meaning compared to light industry. ...


The historical connections, especially those related to Francis Drake, and the final sailing of the Mayflower, together with the view from the Hoe ensure that many visit the historic Barbican and seafront areas. Plymouth has no pleasure beaches, but Tinside Pool, a large lido that was restored in 2003, is at the foot of the Hoe. The city does not have a great deal of tourist accommodation compared to districts like Torbay: in 2006 it had just over 6,000 bed spaces, compared to Torbay's 44,000.[29] This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... For other uses, see Mayflower (disambiguation). ... Plymouth Hoe from Mountbatten Plymouth Hoe, referred to locally as the Hoe, is a large public space in the English port city of Plymouth. ... The Barbican is Plymouths old harbour area and one of the few parts of the original city to escape the bombs of the Luftwaffe during the Second World War. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ...


Plymouth has a large, entirely post-war, shopping area in the city centre. Most of the shops had been destroyed in the Blitz and those that remained were cleared to enable a huge zoned reconstruction according to the 1943 plan.[11] As the new buildings were completed, shops returned from their temporary wartime premises and throughout the 1950s and 60s the city boasted one of the largest and modern shopping centres in the west of England. There was substantial pedestrianisation, more car parks, and a pannier market at the west end of the zone inside a now-listed grade II building that was completed in 1959.[30] In terms of retail floorspace Plymouth is ranked in the top five in the South West,[31] and 29th nationally.[32] Plymouth was one of the first ten British cities to trial the new Business Improvement District initiative.[33] During World War II, the Luftwaffe launched the Blitz, a night-bombing campaign of British towns. ... The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ... This article is about the region. ... A business improvement district (BID) (also known as a special improvement district or a business improvement area) is a public/private sector partnership in which property and business owners of a defined area elect to make a collective contribution to the maintenance, development and marketing/promotion of their commercial district. ...


Plymouth 2020

The old Drake Circus centre was demolished in 2004
The old Drake Circus centre was demolished in 2004
Interior of the new Drake Circus Shopping Centre in 2006.

Plymouth Council is currently undertaking a project of urban redevelopment, the largest since the city was rebuilt after the Second World War. The 'Vision for Plymouth' launched by the architect David Mackay, backed by Plymouth City Council is set to see areas of the city centre demolished, redesigned and rebuilt by the year 2020.[34] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 129 KB) Summary Old Drakes Circus complex in Plymouth, demolished in 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 129 KB) Summary Old Drakes Circus complex in Plymouth, demolished in 2004. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 3599 KB) Interior of the new Drake Circus shopping centre, Plymouth. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 3599 KB) Interior of the new Drake Circus shopping centre, Plymouth. ... One of the entrances to the new shopping centre. ... David Mackay (b. ...


Significant regeneration has occurred in the last five years with the construction and opening of Drake Circus Shopping Centre, built on the site of an earlier shopping arcade to the east of the city centre. The council has encouraged cafés to create outdoor eating areas; and the clearing of a large public area in Armada Way has enabled farmers' markets and other street markets as well as exhibitions, entertainments and festivals. The old Drake Circus shopping centre and Charles Cross car park were demolished in 2004 and have been replaced by the latest Drake Circus Shopping Centre, which opened in October 2006.[35] One of the entrances to the new shopping centre. ... For the free-jazz group, see Farmers Market (band). ... One of the entrances to the new shopping centre. ...


As of 2007, the former Ballard Leisure Centre is being replaced with residential and office space along with a project involving the future demolition of the Bretonside bus station to build a new civic complex. In Drake Circus the Roland Levinsky Building, part of Plymouth University opened in 2007. Other suggestions include the demolition of the Plymouth Pavilions entertainment arena to create a canal 'boulevard' linking Millbay to the city centre. Millbay is being regenerated with mixed residential, retail and office space alongside the ferry port. The Pavilions, located in the centre of Plymouth is Southwest Englands leading entertainment and sports complex. ... For other uses, see Arena (disambiguation). ... Millbay, also known as Millbay Docks is currently a run-down area of dockland in Plymouth extending from West Hoe in the east to Mutton Cove. ...


Transport

The Pont L'Abbé car ferry harboured in Millbay Docks, before it makes its journey to Roscoff in France
The Pont L'Abbé car ferry harboured in Millbay Docks, before it makes its journey to Roscoff in France[36]
The Royal Albert Bridge (closest) and Tamar Bridge (behind) connects Cornwall with Plymouth and the rest of the UK
The Royal Albert Bridge (closest) and Tamar Bridge (behind) connects Cornwall with Plymouth and the rest of the UK
See also: Railways in Plymouth

Plymouth has no motorway links but the national network is accessible via the A38 dual-carriageway Devon Expressway to the M5 motorway which starts about 40 miles (64 km) east near Exeter. The A38 Parkway runs from east to west across the geographical centre of the city. The Tamar Bridge to the west of the city provides vehicle access to Cornwall from the A38 Parkway to Saltash. Millbay, also known as Millbay Docks is currently a run-down area of dockland in Plymouth extending from West Hoe in the east to Mutton Cove. ... , Coordinates , Administration Country Region Bretagne Department Finistère Arrondissement Morlaix Canton Saint-Pol-de-Léon Intercommunality CdC du Pays Léonard Mayor Joseph Seité (2001-2008) Statistics Elevation 0 m–58 m (avg. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 286 KB) Royal Albert Bridge, Saltash, viewed from the Tamar Bridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 286 KB) Royal Albert Bridge, Saltash, viewed from the Tamar Bridge. ... For other bridges bearing the name Albert, see Albert Bridge. ... The Tamar Bridge during widening and strengthening work, 1999 The Tamar Bridge is a major road bridge in southwest England carrying traffic between Devon and Cornwall. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Motorway symbol in UK, Australia, Spain, France and Ireland. ... The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... A38 passing under M50 in Worcestershire The A38 is a major trunk road in England. ... The Tamar Bridge during widening and strengthening work, 1999 The Tamar Bridge is a major road bridge in southwest England carrying traffic between Devon and Cornwall. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Location within the British Isles Saltash (Cornish: Essa) is a town in Cornwall, UK. It has a population of about 16,000. ...


Plymouth Citybus provides bus services to suburban areas of the city and First Group provides other services within the city (including park and ride) and in the surrounding area. Stagecoach Devon provides services to Exeter and Paignton, and Western Greyhound provides services to Liskeard and Newquay. From the Bretonside Bus station located near to Drake Circus, National Express and other operators run long distance coach services to London and many parts of the UK. Plymouth Citybus is one of four bus operators serving the City of Plymouth and the surrounding area. ... First Group PLC (LSE: FGP) is a British transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ... Stagecoach Devon logo Stagecoach Devon Ltd, part of the Stagecoach Group, is a bus operator serving the East Devon and Torbay areas of South West England. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... , Liskeard ( ; IPA — usually stressed on the second syllable) (Cornish: ), is an ancient stannary and market town at the head of the River Looe valley in the ancient hundred of West Wivelshire in southeast Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... , The town should not be confused with New Quay in Wales. ... This article is about the sub-district of Plymouth. ...


A regular international ferry service provided by Brittany Ferries operates from Millbay taking cars and foot passengers directly to France and Spain. There is a passenger ferry between Stonehouse and the Cornish hamlet of Cremyll and a water-bus from the Mayflower Steps to Mount Batten. The city also has an alternative to using the Tamar Bridge via the Torpoint Ferry across the River Tamar. Current Brittany Ferries logo Brittany Ferries is a French ferry company that runs ships between France, the UK, Ireland and Spain. ... Millbay, also known as Millbay Docks is currently a run-down area of dockland in Plymouth extending from West Hoe in the east to Mutton Cove. ... Cremyll Ferry ticket office Cremyll (pronounced ) is a village on the Rame Peninsula in south-east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... The Tamar Bridge during widening and strengthening work, 1999 The Tamar Bridge is a major road bridge in southwest England carrying traffic between Devon and Cornwall. ... One of the new ferries in 2005 Lynher in 2005 The Torpoint Ferry is a car and pedestrian chain ferry crossing the Hamoaze, a stretch of water at the mouth of the River Tamar, between Devonport in Plymouth and Torpoint in Cornwall. ... The Tamar is a river in south western England, that forms most of the border between Devon (to the east) and Cornwall (to the west). ...


The city's only airport is Plymouth City Airport; a small airfield located in the suburb of Derriford 4 miles (6.4 km) north of the city centre, just off the A386 road to Tavistock. The airport is home to the local airline Air Southwest who operate flights across the British Isles. This article is about an airport in Plymouth, Devon, England. ... , Tavistock is a market town within West Devon, England on the River Tavy, from which its name derives, and has a population of 11,018. ... Air Southwest is an airline based at Plymouth City Airport, Plymouth, England. ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ...


The city's central and largest railway station, Plymouth railway station, is an important First Great Western station on the London to Penzance Line and also sees trains on the CrossCountry and South West Trains networks. Smaller stations are served by local trains on the Tamar Valley Line and Cornish Main Line.[37] First Great Western have come under fire recently, due to widespread rail service cuts across the south west, which affect Plymouth greatly.[38] Three MPs from the three main political parties in the region have joined together to put across the message that the train services are vital to its economy.[39] Plymouth station Plymouth railway station serves the city of Plymouth, Devon, UK. It is the largest of the six railway stations in the city, and the only one served by Intercity trains. ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... This article is about CrossCountry trains. ... South West Trains (SWT) is a train operating company operating in the United Kingdom, providing train services to the south-west of London, chiefly in Greater London and the counties of Surrey, Hampshire, Dorset, Devon, Somerset, Berkshire and Wiltshire (the area largely covered before 1923 by the London and South... The Tamar Valley Line is a railway line from Devonport in Plymouth Devon, to Gunnislake in Cornwall, England. ... The Royal Albert Bridge The Cornish Main Line is a railway line in England, which forms the backbone for rail service in Cornwall, as well as prodiving a direct line to London. ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


Education

The Roland Levinsky Building - Arts Department of the University of Plymouth
The Roland Levinsky Building - Arts Department of the University of Plymouth

Plymouth is home to the 11th largest university in the United Kingdom (excluding the Open University), the University of Plymouth.[40] It is the largest university in south west England with over 30,000 students, almost 3,000 staff and an annual income of around £110 million. It was founded as a college of technology and then becoming a polytechnic it also absorbed the School of Maritime Studies. It has courses in maritime business, marine engineering, marine biology and Earth, ocean and environmental sciences, surf science, shipping and logistics.[41] The University of Plymouth is the largest university in the southwest of England, with over 30,000 students and is the fifth largest UK university based on student population. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ... The University of Plymouth is the largest university in the southwest of England, with over 30,000 students and is the fifth largest UK university based on student population. ...


The city is also home to three large colleges. The University College Plymouth St Mark & St John (Marjon), which specialises in teacher training, offers training across the country and abroad[42] The City College Plymouth provides courses from the most basic to Foundation degrees for approximately 26,000 students.[43] The Plymouth College of Art and Design (known as PCAD) offers a selection of courses including Media. It was started 153 years ago and is now one of only four independent colleges of art and design in the UK.[44] Plymouth also has 75 primary phase schools, 14 state secondary schools and eight special schools. It has three selective grammar schools and one public school, Plymouth College.[45] Teacher education refers to the policies and procedures designed to equip teachers with the knowledge, attitudes, behaviours and skills they require to perform their tasks effectively in the school and classroom. ... City College Plymouth logo City College Plymouth (not to be abbreviated to CCP (see corporate identity policy)) is a further education college in South West England. ... The Foundation Degree is a vocational qualification introduced by the UK government in September 2001. ... Plymouth College of Art and Design is an art school based in the city of Plymouth, the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Plymouth College main building Plymouth College (PMC) is a co-educational independent school in Plymouth, Devon, England for day and boarding pupils from the ages of 11 to 18. ...


Religion

The ruined Charles Church, the city's memorial to the civilians killed in the Blitz and Drake Circus Shopping Centre behind
The ruined Charles Church, the city's memorial to the civilians killed in the Blitz and Drake Circus Shopping Centre behind

Plymouth has a Victorian Catholic cathedral located in Stonehouse opened in 1858.[46] Plymouth's senior Anglican church is called St Andrews located in the centre of the city in Royal Parade which hosts the civic services. There is a Quaker Meeting House on Mutley Plain. Adjacent in the city centre post-war ecclesiastical zone are modern Baptist and Unitarian churches. The Greek Orthodox community have converted an old church in West Hoe for their observances. Pentecostals, Christadelphians and Jehovah's Witnesses have their own churches. Charles Church is the second most ancient Parish Church in Plymouth, Devon the senior Church being St Andrews Church, the Mother Church of Plymouth. ... During World War II, the Luftwaffe launched the Blitz, a night-bombing campaign of British towns. ... One of the entrances to the new shopping centre. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... View of Mutley Plain looking north from the junction with North Hill Mutley Plain is a street in Plymouth, Devon. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ...


Other than all of Plymouth's Christian places of worship are some places from other religions. The small Jewish community has an eighteenth century synagogue; the small Muslim community have a mosque at the Islamic Centre in North Road East; the Bahá'í have a meeting place at Dale Road in Mutley; the Buddhists have a place in St Jude's and there is also a Scientology building in Beaumont Road. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ...


Sports

Outside Home Park before Argyle play a match
Outside Home Park before Argyle play a match

Plymouth is the largest city in England never to have had a football team in the first tier of English football. It is home to Plymouth Argyle Football Club, who play in the Football League Championship (second tier of English football) at the Home Park stadium in Central Park. It is Plymouth's only professional football team, however the city used to have another team called Plymouth United F.C. dating back to 1886.[47] The club takes its nickname from the group of English non-conformists that left Plymouth for the New World in 1620: the club crest features the Mayflower, which carried the pilgrims to Massachusetts and the club's mascot is named Pilgrim Pete. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1632, 484 KB) Summary Photo of the Devonport Stand of Home Park which I took myself and have released into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1632, 484 KB) Summary Photo of the Devonport Stand of Home Park which I took myself and have released into the public domain. ... Home Park is an Association Football stadium located in Plymouth, England, and is home to Plymouth Argyle, who currently play in the Football League Championship. ... For details of the current season, see Plymouth Argyle F.C. season 2007-08 Plymouth Argyle Football Club, commonly known as the Pilgrims, are one of only two clubs in the Football League to play in a principally green home strip. ... Plymouth Argyle Football Club (commonly known as the Pilgrims) are an English football team, playing in the Championship league. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... Home Park is an Association Football stadium located in Plymouth, England, and is home to Plymouth Argyle, who currently play in the Football League Championship. ... Plymouths Central Park is a large centralised park situated to the north of Plymouth city centre, stretching north from the train station to Pounds House, Peverell and west from Ford Park Cemetery to the A386 (Outland Road and Alma Road). ... Plymouth United Football Club was a football club from Plymouth. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... For other uses, see Mayflower (disambiguation). ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


The city is also home to clubs in nearly all sports, notably Plymouth Albion R.F.C. and the Plymouth Raiders basketball club. Plymouth Albion Rugby Football Club is a rugby union club that was founded in 1875 and are currently in the second tier of English rugby union.[48] Plymouth Raiders play in the top tier of British Bastketball, the British Basketball League. They play at the Plymouth Pavilions, along with many other sports clubs and were founded in 1983.[49] Plymouth is also home to two American Football clubs: The Plymouth Admirals and the Plymouth Blitz. Plymouth Albion Rugby Football Club is a rugby union club who play in Plymouth, England. ... The Plymouth Raiders, officially called Kularoos Plymouth Raiders by sponsorship, is South-west Englands leading basketball team. ... Plymouth Albion Rugby Football Club is a rugby union club who play in Plymouth, England. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Plymouth Raiders, officially called Kularoos Plymouth Raiders by sponsorship, is South-west Englands leading basketball team. ... “BBL” redirects here. ... The Pavilions, located in the centre of Plymouth is Southwest Englands leading entertainment and sports complex. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Plymouth Admirals are a British American Football club based in the city of Plymouth, Devon, who compete in the BAFL Division 2 South West. ... Entered BCAFL 2001-2002 Team Colors Black & Gold Universities University of Plymouth, University of Exeter, Seale-Hayne College, College of St. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Plymouth
The view of the 2006 British Fireworks Championship over Plymouth Sound
The view of the 2006 British Fireworks Championship over Plymouth Sound

Plymouth has theatres, cinemas and art galleries as well as television stations. Outdoor events and festivals are held including the British Fireworks Championship and The Music of the Night, an outdoor production held every two years in The Royal Citadel when amateurs sing to service unit musicians. The Plymouth Morris Men perform throughout the year at many events and venues. In August 2006 the world record for the most amount of simultaneous fireworks was surpassed, by Roy Lowry of the University of Plymouth, over Plymouth Sound.[50] Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about a television transmitting location or company. ... The Music of the Night is a song from the musical The Phantom of the Opera. ... The University of Plymouth is the largest university in the southwest of England, with over 30,000 students and is the fifth largest UK university based on student population. ... Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ...


The city's main theatre, Theatre Royal is a provincial producing theatre and incorporates a studio theatre (The Drum). Its production and education centre, TR2, is in an award-winning building at Cattedown.[51] The University has two well-equipped theatres within the Roland Levinsky Building. Amateurs perform at the Athenaeum Theatre, Devonport Playhouse, and the Globe Theatre (within Stonehouse barracks). The Plymouth Pavilions stages music concerts from rock and pop to ballet, as well as hosting basketball, wrestling and line dancing. There is a multiplex cinema at the Barbican Leisure Centre and a small cinema at Derry's Cross. In Looe Street, Plymouth Arts Centre has a two screen cinema specialising in art house and foreign films. The Theatre Royal in Plymouth is a major producing and receiving house consisting of a large main auditorium housing west end musicals, opera and ballet and also a smaller experimental theatre called The Drum. Official Website Categories: | | ... The Pavilions, located in the centre of Plymouth is Southwest Englands leading entertainment and sports complex. ... Multiplex may mean: Multiplex (comics), a DC Comics character. ... See also: Art Film It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rochester Institute of Technology. ...


At the heart of Plymouth's nightlife is Union Street. Previously lined with music halls and cinemas, the street is now run down,[52] but is still home to a number of bars, clubs and casinos. Other clubs and bars are at the Barbican Leisure Park and on Lockyer Street. Union Street in Plymouth, Devon, is a long street connecting the city centre to Devonport, Plymouths naval base and docks. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ...


Plymouth is regional television centre of BBC South West. ITV's television studio at Langage is to close in 2008. The regional stations include BBC Radio Devon, BBC Radio Cornwall, South Hams Radio, Plymouth Sound and Pirate FM. The main regional newspaper is the Western Morning News, whose local publishing and print centre at Derriford were designed by architect Nicholas Grimshaw. The local city paper, from the same publisher, Northcliffe Media group, at the same print centre, is the Plymouth 'Herald'. BBC Television Centre (sometimes abbreviated TVC or TC) in London is home to much of the BBCs television output and, since 1998, almost all of the corporations national TV and radio news output by BBC News. ... BBC South West is the BBC English Region producing local television, radio, web and teletext content for Devon, Cornwall and the Channel Islands. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio Devon is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Devon, and began transmissions on 17 January 1983, replacing a previous breakfast show (Morning SouWest) for Devon and Cornwall broadcast on the local frequencies of Radio 4. ... BBC Radio Cornwall is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Cornwall. ... South Hams Radio Categories: Station stubs | UK Radio Stations ... Map of the UK showing the location of Plymouth Sound at 50. ... Pirate FM is one of the Independent Local Radio stations for Cornwall. ... The Western Morning News is a daily regional newspaper covering Devon and Cornwall and parts of Somerset and Dorset. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Sir Nicholas Grimshaw (born 1939) is a prominent English architect, particularly noted for several modernist buildings, including the international railway terminal at Londons Waterloo Station and the Eden Project in Cornwall. ... Northcliffe Media (formerly Northcliffe Newspapers Group) is a large regional newspaper publisher in the UK. The companys name was changed to Northcliffe Media in 2007. ... The Herald is South West Media Groups Plymouth-based newspaper. ...


Public services

View of Derriford Hospital's incenerator chimney after a snowfall
View of Derriford Hospital's incenerator chimney after a snowfall

Since 1973 Plymouth has been supplied water by South West Water. Prior to the 1973 take over it was supplied by Plymouth County Borough Corporation.[53] About 5 miles (8.0 km) north of the city is Burator Reservoir, which was constructed in 1898 and later expanded in 1929. It still supplies much of the water for Plymouth. Plymouth City Council is responsible for waste management throughout the city[54] and South West Water is responsible for sewerage. Plymouth's electricity is supplied up north on the National Grid and distributed to Plymouth via the Western Power Distribution. At present there isn't a power station (excluding wind turbines) in Devon and Cornwall, however the Langage Power Station, a gas powered station on the outskirts of Plympton, is due to start producing electricity for Plymouth at the end of 2009.[55] Derriford Hospital, is a medium-sized teaching hospital situated in Plymouth, Devon. ... South West Water Services Limited is a water supply and sewerage utility company serving part of south west England. ... Meldon dam. ... For the company, see Waste Management, Inc. ... South West Water Services Limited is a water supply and sewerage utility company serving part of south west England. ... The National Grid is the high-voltage electric power transmission network in Great Britain, connecting power stations and major substations and ensuring that electricity generated anywhere in Great Britain can be used to satisfy demand elsewhere. ... WPD is the trading identity of two electricity distribution companies - WPD South West (operating in South West England) and WPD South Wales (operating in South Wales). ... A tall tower holds a wind turbine aloft where winds are consistently stronger. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Langage Power Station is to be constructed near the city of Plymouth in Devon. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Power station (disambiguation). ... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ...


Plymouth is served by Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust and the city's NHS hospital is Derriford Hospital 4 miles (6.4 km) north of the city centre and there is also a royal eye emfermiry. South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust operates in Plymouth and the rest of the south west; its headquarters are in Exeter. Her Majesty's Court Service provide a Magistrates' Court, Crown and County Courts in the city. The nearest High Court is in Exeter as are the police and prosecuting headquarters. There is no prison or youth detention unit in Plymouth. The Plymouth Borough Police, formed in 1836, eventually became part of Devon and Cornwall Constabulary.[56] There are police stations at Charles Cross and Crownhill (the Divisional HQ) and smaller stations at Plympton and Plymstock.[57] The city has one the Devon and Cornwall Area Crown Prosecution Service Divisional offices.[58] Plymouth has several large fire stations located in Crownhill, Camel's Head, Green Bank, and Plympton, which is part of Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service. There is also a fire service training centre located in Plympton. National Health Service Trusts (NHS Trusts) provide many services of the United Kingdom National Health Service in England and Wales. ... Derriford Hospital, is a medium-sized teaching hospital situated in Plymouth, Devon. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... This article is about Magistrates Courts in England and Wales. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... High Court usually refers to the superior court of a country or state. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... The Crown Prosecution Service, or CPS, is a non-ministerial department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences in England and Wales. ... Crownhill is an area of northern Plymouth, England. ... Green Bank is located within Pocahontas County, West Virginia (Eastern Region), inside the Allegheny Mountain Range, and can be reached via Hwy 28. ... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ... Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service or FRS covering the counties of Somerset and Devon, including the unitary authorities of Plymouth and Torbay, in the south west of England Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service was founded on 1 April 2007... Plympton is a suburb located in south-east Plymouth. ...


Notable people

Main article: List of people from Plymouth
Statue of Sir Francis Drake, Mayor of Plymouth, on the Hoe.
Statue of Sir Francis Drake, Mayor of Plymouth, on the Hoe.

People from Plymouth are known as Plymothians or less formally as Janners. Frank Bickerton was one of the pioneering Antarctic explorers in the early 20th century. He moved to Plymouth as a child in 1895 and lived in the city until 1920. The artist Beryl Cook lived in Plymouth for much of her life and her paintings depict some of the colourful characters she encountered in the city. The actress Dawn French came from Plymouth and attended St Dunstans Abbey independent school for girls. People born in Plymouth include Olympic swimmer Sharon Davies, gold medal-winning diver Thomas Daley,[59] dancer Wayne Sleep, newsreader and journalist Angela Rippon and the ghostwriter and author Helen Grant. Other notable residents include footballer Trevor Francis, Newsreader Sue Lawley, the tennis player Sue Barker, and TV Presenter Fern Briton. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... Historically, janner is a British slang term used to describe a person who lives within sight of the sea. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Beryl Cook, OBE (born 10 September 1926 in Surrey) is a popular English painter. ... Dawn Roma French[1] (born 11 October 1957) is an Welsh actress and comedian. ... Sharron Davies (born 1 November 1962) is one of Britains most successful swimmers ever. ... A diver is an person who practices scuba diving or surface supplied diving. ... Wayne Sleep (born 1948) is an English dancer. ... Angela Rippon, OBE (born October 12, 1944) is a well-known British television journalist and lesbian. ... For other uses, see Ghostwriter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Trevor John Francis (born April 19, 1954 in Boxhill, Plymouth, England), was a noted footballer and Englands first £1 million player. ... Sue Lawley (born 14 July 1946) is an English broadcaster. ... Sue Barker, MBE (born April 19, 1956, in Paignton, Devon, England) is a television presenter and former professional tennis player. ...


References

  1. ^ HMNB Devonport. The Royal Navy. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  2. ^ Place-names of Plymouth. Plymouth Data. Retrieved on 2008-06-05.
  3. ^ The bone caves of Plymouth and district website. The Devon Karst Research Society. Retrieved on 2008-05-27.
  4. ^ Barry Cunliffe (2004). Britain and the Continent: Networks of Interaction. In A Companion to Roman Britain, ed. Malcolm Todd. Blackwell Publishing. p. 3. ISBN 0-631-21823-8. Google Book Search. Retrieved 2007-10-13.
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  7. ^ Langley, Martin (1987). Millbay Docks (Port of Plymouth series). Exeter: Devon Books, 17. ISBN 0-86114-806-1. 
  8. ^ a b Gill, Crispin (1993). Plymouth. A New History. Devon Books, 259-262. ISBN 0-86114-882-7. 
  9. ^ Plymouth, Naval War Memorial. Plymouth Data. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  10. ^ Gould, Jeremy : Architecture and the Plan for Plymouth: The Legacy of a British City, Architectural Review March 2007
  11. ^ a b c d Gill, Crispin (1993). Plymouth. A New History. Devon Books, 262-267. ISBN 0-86114-882-7. 
  12. ^ Three Towns Amalgamation. The Times February 9, 1914.
  13. ^ Union of Plymouth and Devonport. The Times. 4 May 1914.
  14. ^ The City of Plymouth. The Times. 18 October 1928.
  15. ^ Council and democracy. Plymouth City Council. Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
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  17. ^ 10 reasons why the Council feels the Civic Centre should not be listed. Plymouth City Council. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
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  19. ^ "Lord Mayor bats 'The labour curse'", The Herald, 2008-05-17. Retrieved on 2008-06-07. 
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  21. ^ Twin towns. Plymouth City Council. Retrieved on 2008-03-01.
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  58. ^ Your Local CPS : Devon and Cornwall. The Crown Prosecution Service. Retrieved on 2008-02-16.
  59. ^ Thomas Daley Biography. The British Olympic Association. Retrieved on 2007-02-12.
  • Dunning, Martin (2001). Around Plymouth. Frith Book Co Ltd
  • Gill, Crispin (1993). Plymouth: A New History. Devon Books
  • Robinson, Chris (2004). Plymouth Then & Now. Plymouth Prints
  • Casley, Nicholas (1997). The Medieval Incorporation of Plymouth and a Survey of the Borough's Bounds. Old Plymouth Society.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Times. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Times. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Times. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Herald is South West Media Groups Plymouth-based newspaper. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hong Kong Observatory (Chinese: 香港天文台; Yale: hēung góng tīn màhn tòih, Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 tin1 man4 toi4; Mandarin Pinyin: Xiānggǎng Tiānwén Tái), known as the Royal Observatory (Chinese: 皇家香港天文台) before 1997, is a department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Met Office (originally an abbreviation for Meteorological Office, but now the official name in itself), which has its headquarters at Exeter in Devon, is the United Kingdoms national weather service. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Current Brittany Ferries logo Brittany Ferries is a French ferry company that runs ships between France, the UK, Ireland and Spain. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Network Rail is a British not for dividend company limited by guarantee whose principal asset is Network Rail Infrastructure Limited, a company limited by shares. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Times. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Plymouth is the largest university in the southwest of England, with over 30,000 students and is the fifth largest UK university based on student population. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... City College Plymouth logo City College Plymouth (not to be abbreviated to CCP (see corporate identity policy)) is a further education college in South West England. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Plymouth College of Art and Design is an art school based in the city of Plymouth, the United Kingdom. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For details of the current season, see Plymouth Argyle F.C. season 2007-08 Plymouth Argyle Football Club, commonly known as the Pilgrims, are one of only two clubs in the Football League to play in a principally green home strip. ... Plymouth Albion Rugby Football Club is a rugby union club who play in Plymouth, England. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Plymouth Raiders, officially called Kularoos Plymouth Raiders by sponsorship, is South-west Englands leading basketball team. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Crown Prosecution Service, or CPS, is a non-ministerial department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences in England and Wales. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini/Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Olympic Association (BOA) is responsible for the United Kingdoms participation in the Olympic Games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Plymouth City Council website
  • Chris Robinson's Plymouth Prints and local history
  • Aerial photographs of Plymouth
  • Plymouth Picture Postcards (mostly pre-WWII)

Coordinates: 50°21′51″N, 4°8′37″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... East Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... Mid Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... See also North Devon (UK Parliament constituency) North Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... Torridge is a local government district in Devon, England. ... West Devon is a local government district and borough in Devon, England. ... South Hams is a local government district on the south coast of Devon, England. ... Teignbridge is a local government district in Devon, England. ... External link Appledore (DMOZ.org) Categories: Stub | Towns in Devon ... Ashburton is a little town on the fringes of Dartmoor in Devon, lying adjacent to the A38 Devon Expressway. ... Location within the British Isles Arms of Axminster Town Council Axminster is a small market town on the eastern border of Devon, England. ... Statistics Population: 34,000 (April 2006 Est. ... Location within the British Isles Beach at Beer. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... , Bradninch is a small town in Devon, England, lying about three miles south of Cullompton. ... Brixham (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. ... Buckfastleigh is a small town in Devon, England, partly within Dartmoor National Park, and on the A38. ... The Beach at Budleigh Salterton Budleigh Salterton is a small town on the south coast of Devon, England approximately 15 miles south of Exeter. ... Location within the British Isles Chagford is a small town on the north-east edge of Dartmoor, in Devon, England, close to the River Teign. ... Chudleigh is a small town in Devon, England located between the towns of Newton Abbot and Exeter. ... Colyford is a small town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... The Church of St. ... Cranbrook is the name chosen for a new town in East Devon, it will initially consist of 2,900 residential properties (up to 6,550 properties by 2026[1]) as well as all the required infrastructure to support a town of this size. ... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... Location within the British Isles Cullompton is a town in Devon, England, lying on the River Culm and close to the M5 Motorway. ... Map sources for Dartmouth, Devon at grid reference SX877514 The town seen from the River Dart Dartmouth is a town in Devon in the south-west of England. ... Map sources for Dawlish at grid reference SX963767 The Great Western Main Line runs along the Dawlish seafront Dawlish is a town on the south coast of Devon, England, 12 miles from the County town of Exeter, with a population of around 13,000 people. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... Map sources for Exmouth at grid reference SY004809 Exmouth is a town in Devon, England, at the east side of the mouth of the River Exe. ... The old Town Hall (now the town museum) in the centre of Great Torrington. ... Location within the British Isles The town of Hartland, which incorporates the hamlet of Stoke to the west and the village of Meddon in the south, is the most north-westerly settlement in the county of Devon, England. ... The Hatherleigh Website here Location within the British Isles Hatherleigh is a small Market Town in Devon, England. ... A (very) small market town in the west of Devon, UK, near the county border with Cornwall. ... Location within the British Isles Honiton is a town in Devon, England. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ... Ivybridge is a town in the South Hams area of Devon, England. ... For the Kingsbridge in New York City, see Kingsbridge, Bronx, New York. ... Moretonhampstead is a fairly small market town in Devon, England. ... You may be looking for Newton Abbot (UK Parliament constituency) , Newton Abbot is a market town in Devon, England on the River Teign, with a population of 23,580 (2001 census). ... North Tawton is a small town in Devon, England, on the river Taw. ... Northam is a small town in Devon, England, lying north of Bideford and south of Westward Ho!. It is thought to have been the site of an Anglo-Saxon castle, and is said to have been where Hubba the Dane attacked Devon and was repelled (perhaps by Alfred the Great... Okehampton is a town in Devon, England, at the northern edge of Dartmoor, on the River Okement. ... Map sources for Ottery St Mary at grid reference SY099955 Ottery St Mary is a town in Devon, England, on the River Otter, about ten miles east of Exeter. ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... Location within the British Isles Princetown is a town situated on Dartmoor in the county of Devon in England. ... The view from Salcombe waterfront Salcombe is a town in the South Hams district of Devon, England on the Kingsbridge Estuary. ... A town in western Devon, most famous for being the place where the Western Rebellion (otherwise known as the Prayerbook rebellion) first started, and where the rebels made their final stand. ... , Seaton is a seaside town in East Devon on the south coast of England. ... Location within the British Isles Sidmouth Arms of Sidmouth Town Council Sidmouth is a small town of 14,400 on the east Devon coast in south west England about 15 miles south east of Exeter. ... South Molton is a town in Devon, England Categories: Devon geography stubs | Towns in Devon ... , Tavistock is a market town within West Devon, England on the River Tavy, from which its name derives, and has a population of 11,018. ... , Teignmouth (IPA: ) is a town on the north bank of the estuary mouth of the River Teign in south Devon, England. ... Tiverton is a town in the County of Devon, in England. ... Map sources for Topsham, Devon at grid reference SX966884 Topsham is a small town in Devon, England, on the east side of the River Exe estuary between Exeter and Exmouth. ... This article is about the English town. ... , Totnes (IPA: ) is a market town in South Devon, England. ... Westward Ho! is a seaside town in Torridge, Devon, England, near Bideford. ... This is a list of civil parishes in the ceremonial county of Devon in England. ...

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