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Encyclopedia > Plutus

In Greek mythology, Plutus ("wealth" Πλοῦτος) was a son of Demeter and the Titan Iasion and was the personification and god of wealth and money. He was blinded by Zeus so that he would be able to dispense his gifts without prejudice. He is also lame, as he takes his time arriving, and winged, so he leaves faster than he came. He is associated with Hades and often portrayed with a horn of plenty (sometimes known as a cornucopia). The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... Ceres (Demeter), allegory of August: detail of a fresco by Cosimo Tura, Palazzo Schifanoia, Ferrara, 1469-70 Dêmêtêr (or Demetra) (Greek: , mother-earth or perhaps distribution-mother, perhaps from the noun of the Indo-European mother-earth *dheghom *mater) is the Greek goddess of grain and agriculture... In Greek mythology, Iasion or Iasus was usually the son of Electra and Zeus and brother of Dardanus. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive: Διός Díos), is... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cornucopia (disambiguation). ...


Plutus, by the Ancient Greek comedy playwright Aristophanes, tells a story where the god's sight is restored. He is then able to determine who is deserving of wealth. In Greek mythology, Plutus (wealth) was a son of Demeter and Iasion and was the personification of wealth. ... Greek comedy is the name given to a wide genre of theatrical plays written, and performed, in Ancient Greece. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , c. ...


In Lucian of Samosata's satirical dialogue Timon, Ploutus, the very embodiment of worldly goods written up in a parchment will, says to Hermes: Lucian of Samosata (c. ...

it is not Zeus who sends me, but Pluto, who has his own ways of conferring wealth and making presents; Pluto and Plutus are not unconnected, you see. When I am to flit from one house to another, they lay me on parchment, seal me up carefully, make a parcel of me and take me round. The dead man lies in some dark corner, shrouded from the knees upward in an old sheet, with the cats fighting for possession of him, while those who have expectations wait for me in the public place, gaping as wide as young swallows that scream for their mother's return.

Words with the prefix Pluto- (implying wealth)

Like many other figures in Greek and Roman mythology, Plutus' name leads to many modern words. These include:

  • Plutocracy: Rule by the wealthiest
  • Plutonomics: The study of wealth management
  • Plutocrat: Wealthy ruler
  • Plutolatry: the "worship" of money
  • Plutomania: the delusion that one is immensely wealthy

A plutocracy is a form of government where the states power is centralized in an affluent social class. ...

Character in Dante's Divine Comedy

In Canto VII of Dante's Divine Comedy, Plutus (Pluto in the original Italian) is a wolf-like demon of wealth which guards over the fourth circle of hell, the Hoarders and the Wasters. Dante in a fresco series of famous men by Andrea del Castagno, ca. ... Ajani shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is a place or a state of pain and suffering. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Plutus

he also appears in the inferno By the way, Dante didn't really write the divine comedy, i did, After I wrote it (which, by the way was emotionally stenuous) he appeared in a time warp and stole the deed giving the rights to the story. >:( Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Plutus - definition of Plutus in Encyclopedia (385 words)
In Greek mythology, Plutus ("wealth") was a son of Demeter and Iasion and was the personification of wealth.
He is associated with Hades and often portrayed with a horn of plenty (sometimes known as a cornucopia).
In Dante's Divine Comedy, Plutus is a wolf-like demon of wealth which dwells in the fourth level of hell.
Mammon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (727 words)
For Thomas Carlyle in Past and Present, the 'Gospel of Mammonism' became simply a metaphoric personification for the materialist spirit of the nineteenth century.
Mammon is somewhat similar to the Greek god Plutus, and the Roman Dis Pater, in his description, and it is likely that he was at some point based on them; especially since Plutus appears in The Divine Comedy as a wolf-like demon of wealth, wolves being associated with greed in the Middle Ages.
Thomas Aquinas metaphorically described the sin of Avarice as "Mammon being carried up from Hell by a wolf, coming to inflame the human heart with Greed".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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