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Encyclopedia > Pluto (mythology)

Pluto is an alternative name for the Greek god Hades, but was more often used in Roman mythology in their presentation of the god of the underworld. He abducted Proserpina (Gr. Persephone), and her mother Ceres (Gr. Demeter) who then caused winter in her grief. Although he is often envisioned today as evil (for his similarities to the Christian Satan) the Romans did not view him as such. Pluto is the second-largest dwarf planet in the Solar system. ... Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... In Greek mythology, Plutus (wealth Πλοῦτος) was a son of Demeter and the Titan Iasion and was the personification and god of wealth and money. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Rape of Proserpina, by Luca Giordano Proserpine, 1873-1877, at Tate Gallery, London. ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Persephónē) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...


Pluto was originally not the god of the underworld. Pluto is cognate with the Greek word "Ploutos" (wealth, cf. plutocracy), and, under the original name Plutus, was considered by the Romans as the giver of gold, silver, and other subterranean substances. Because these "gifts" were mined, Pluto became recognized as the god of the physical underworld, which in turn helped him become recognized as the god of the spiritual underworld and thus death. This brought about his mythological relationship to the Greek god Hades. Because the mythology of these gods is more known than the actual religious roles of the gods, Pluto is identified as the counterpart to the Greek Hades (which is only wholly true in mythology). A plutocracy is a form of government where the states power is centralized in an affluent social class. ... In Greek mythology, Plutus (wealth Πλοῦτος) was a son of Demeter and the Titan Iasion and was the personification and god of wealth and money. ...


The dwarf planet Pluto is named after him. Artists impression of Pluto (background) and Charon (foreground). ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ...


Pluto (Greek: Πλούτων), although related, should not be confused with the Greek god Plutus (Πλοῦτος), the god of wealth. In Greek mythology, Plutus (wealth Πλοῦτος) was a son of Demeter and the Titan Iasion and was the personification and god of wealth and money. ...


"Plutonic Theory", the idea that the earth was formed due to intense heat in the earth, stems from Pluto, the opposing theory of which is the Neptunian Theory which states that the formation of the earth was caused by the agency of water. Plutonic theory is the geologic theory proposed by James Hutton around the turn of the 19th century that volcanic activity was the source of rocks on the surface of the Earth. ... Neptunism is a discredited and obsolete scientific theory of geology proposed by Johan Gottlob Lehmann and Abraham Werner in the later half of the 18th century. ...

A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... In Roman mythology, Ceres was the goddess of growing plants (particularly cereals) and of motherly love. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana In Roman mythology, Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck, but she could be represented veiled and blind, as modern depictions... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... Lares (pl. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... Head of Minerva by Elihu Vedder, 1896 For other uses, see Minerva (disambiguation). ... Genoese admiral Andrea Doria as Neptune, by Agnolo Bronzino. ... In Roman mythology, Quirinus was an early god of the Roman state. ... Coin of Emperor Probus, circa 280, with Sol Invictus riding a quadriga, with legend SOLI INVICTO, to the Unconquered Sun. Note how the Emperor (on the left) wears a radiated solar crown, worn also by the god (to the right). ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology. ... The Forge of Vulcan by Diego Velasquez, (1630). ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pluto (mythology) - Search Results - MSN Encarta (235 words)
Pluto (mythology), in Roman mythology, god of the dead, the husband of Proserpine.
Neptune (mythology), in Roman mythology, god of the sea, son of the god Saturn, and brother of Jupiter, king of the gods, and Pluto, god of the...
Pluto is an alternate name for the Greek god Hades, but was more often used in Roman mythology in their presentation of the god of the underworld.
Pluto (107 words)
Pluto is the Roman god of the underworld and the judge of the dead.
Pluto's wife was Proserpina (Greek name, Persephone) whom he had kidnapped and dragged into the underworld.
Pluto was known as a pitiless god because if a mortal entered his Underworld they could never hope to return.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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