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Encyclopedia > Pleural cavity
Pleural cavity
Front view of thorax, showing the relations of the pleuræ and lungs to the chest wall. Pleura in blue; lungs in purple.
A transverse section of the thorax, showing the contents of the middle and the posterior mediastinum. The pleural and pericardial cavities are exaggerated since normally there is no space between parietal and visceral pleura and between pericardium and heart.
Gray's subject #238 1088
MeSH Pleural+Cavity

The lungs are surrounded by two membranes, the pleurae. The outer pleura is attached to the chest wall and is known as the parietal pleura; the inner one is attached to the lung and other visceral tissues and is known as the visceral pleura. In between the two is a thin space known as the pleural cavity or pleural space. It is filled with pleural fluid, a serous fluid produced by the pleura. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Diagram of a tsetse fly, showing the head, thorax and abdomen The thorax is a division of an animals body that lies between the head and the abdomen. ... The lungs are surrounded by two membranes, the pleurae. ... The heart and lungs (from an older edition of Grays Anatomy) The lung is an organ belonging to the respiratory system and interfacing to the circulatory system of air-breathing vertebrates. ... Image File history File links Gray968. ... Diagram of a tsetse fly, showing the head, thorax and abdomen The thorax is a division of an animals body that lies between the head and the abdomen. ... FIG. 967– Transverse section through the upper margin of the second thoracic vertebra The mediastinum is a non-delineated group of structures in the thorax (chest), surrounded by loose connective tissue. ... The pericardium is a double-walled sac that contains the heart and the roots of the great vessels. ... The pericardium is a double-walled sac that contains the heart and the roots of the great vessels. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Image:3DScience respiratory labeled. ... A serous membrane is a very thin layer of cells (usually one row) covering internal body cavity. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In anatomy, the viscera are the internal organs of an animal, in particular the internal organs of the head, thorax and abdomen. ... In physiology, the term serous fluid is used for various bodily fluids that are typically pale yellow and transparent, and of a benign nature. ...


The pleural fluid lubricates the pleural surfaces and allows the layers of pleura to slide against each other easily during respiration. It also provides the surface tension that keeps the lung surface in contact with the chest wall. During quiet breathing, the cavity normally experiences a negative pressure (compared to the atmosphere) which helps adhere the lungs to the chest wall, so that movements of the chest wall during breathing are coupled closely to movements of the lungs.


The pleural membrane also helps to keep the two lungs away from each other and air tight, thus if one lung is punctured and collapses due to an accident, the other pleural cavity will still be air tight, and the other lung will work normally.


The parietal pleura is highly sensitive to pain; the visceral pleura is not. The visceral pleura has a dual blood supply, from the bronchial and pulmonary arteries. In humans, there is no anatomical connection between the left and right pleural cavities, so in cases of pneumothorax (see below), the other hemithorax will still be able to function normally. Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... Bronchial Artery The bronchial arteries supply nutrients and oxygen to the root of the lungs, the supporting tissues of the lungs, and the visceral pleura of the lungs. ... The pulmonary arteries carry blood from the heart to the lungs. ...

Contents

Diseases

Diseases involving the pleura include:

  • Pneumothorax (collapsed lung): air enters the pleural cavity, either from the outside or from the lung. This can be the result of a penetrating chest wound, or of an internal injury. A tension pneumothorax is where the punctured chest wall forms a one way valve so that air may enter (through the puncture) on inspiration, but cannot exit on expiration. With each breath air builds up in the chest cavity, compressing the lung still further, thus reducing the surface area available for gas exchange. It is a medical emergency.
  • Pleural effusion: fluid accumulates in the pleural space, compressing the lungs. This can result for example from lung cancer, infection or heart failure.
  • Mesothelioma: this is a type of cancer caused by asbestos exposure.
  • Pleurisiya: an inflammatory of the pleura, especially one causing painful respiration. Pleurisy can be provoked by a variety of infectious and non-infectious causes. The modern term for this is pleuritis, but the older term is still in common use.

Left-sided pneumothorax (on the right side of the image) on CT scan of the chest with chest tube in place. ... A medical emergency is an injury or illness that poses an immediate threat to a persons health or life which requires help from a doctor or hospital. ... Pleural effusion Chest x-ray of a pleural effusion. ... Image:3DScience respiratory labeled. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Fibrous asbestos on muscovite Asbestos Asbestos Asbestos (a misapplication of Latin: asbestos quicklime from Greek : a, not and sbestos, extinguishable) describes any of a group of minerals that can be fibrous, many of which are metamorphic and are hydrous magnesium silicates. ... Inflammation is the first response of the immune system to infection or irritation and may be referred to as the innate cascade. ...

See Also

Look up trachea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word capillary is used to describe any very narrow tube or channel through which a fluid can pass. ... Voicebox redirects here. ... The pharynx (plural: pharynges) is the part of the neck and throat situated immediately posterior to the mouth and nasal cavity, and cranial, or superior, to the esophagus, larynx, and trachea. ... Haha u cant see this b/c wiess The epiglottis is a thin, lid-like flap of cartilage tissue covered with a mucous membrane, attached to the root of the tongue, that guards the entrance of the glottis, the opening between the vocal cords. ... A bronchus (plural bronchi, adjective bronchial) is a caliber of airway in the respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. ... The bronchioles are the first airway branches that no longer contain cartilage. ...

Additional images

External links

  • Photo of dissection

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pleural cavity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (424 words)
In anatomy, the pleural cavity is the potential space between the lungs and the chest wall, more technically defined as the space between the visceral pleura and the parietal pleura.
During quiet breathing, the cavity normally experiences a negative pressure (compared to the atmosphere) which helps adhere the lungs to the chest wall, so that movements of the chest wall during breathing are coupled closely to move the lungs.
The pleura and pleural fluid function to reduce friction between the lungs and the inside of the chest wall during breathing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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