FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > Platysma muscle

The platysma is a superficial muscle that stretches from the clavicle to the mandible overlapping the sternocleidomastoid. Superficial is a general term meaning regarding the surface, often metaphorically. ... A top-down view of skeletal muscle Muscle is a contractile form of tissue. ... Left clavicle - from above Left clavicle - from below In human anatomy, the clavicle or collar bone is a bone that makes up part of the shoulder girdle. ... This article is about the human bone. ... In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid muscles are muscles in the neck that acts to flex and rotate the head. ...


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NECK LIPOSUCTION OR FACE-LIFT? (2447 words)
These structures include the laryngeal cartilage (Adam's apple, which is larger in men), the hyoid bone, the tongue muscle, and the platysma muscle (sheet-like muscle) and the fat which lies between the platysma and the surface dermis (leather layer) of the skin.
The platysma is a sheet-like muscle that extends from the lower jawbone all the way to the collarbone of the neck.
Platysma bands eventually become thick and cord-like, which causes them to tent the skin of the neck as they contract, tether or dangle between the jawbone and the collarbone.
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