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Encyclopedia > Platonic love
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AffinityAttachmentBisexualityBondingCohabitationCompersionConcubinageCourtshipDivorceFriendshipFamily • Homosexuality • Heterosexuality • IncestInfatuationIntimacyJealousyLimerenceLoveMarriageMonogamyNonmonogamyPassionPartnerPederastyPlatonic lovePsychology of MonogamySexualitySeparationWidowhood This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Attachment in adults deals with the theory of attachment in adult romantic relationships. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The term human bond, or more generally human bonding, refers to the process or formation of a close personal relationship, as between a parent and child, especially through frequent or constant association. ... This article is about a living arrangement. ... Compersion is love manifested when a person takes joy in his or her partners happiness with another person. ... It has been suggested that Pilegesh be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the record label, see Divorce Records. ... Friendship is a term used to denote co-operative and supportive behaviour between two or more humans. ... A family in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 A family consists of a domestic group of people (or a number of domestic groups), typically affiliated by birth or marriage, or by analogous or comparable relationships — including domestic partnership, cohabitation, adoption, surname and (in some cases) ownership (as occurred in the... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Infatuation, the state of being completely carried away by unreasoning passion or love; addictive love. ... Definition Intimacy is complex in that its meaning varies from relationship to relationship, and within a given relationship over time. ... Jealousy typically refers to the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that occur when a person believes a valued relationship is being threatened by a rival. ... Limerence, as posited by psychologist Dorothy Tennov, is an involuntary cognitive and emotional state in which a person feels an intense romantic desire for another person (the limerent object). ... Love is any of a number of emotions and experiences related to a sense of strong affection or profound oneness. ... “Matrimony” redirects here. ... Monogamy is the custom or condition of having only one mate during a period of time. ... Poly relationship (from polygamy, polyamory et al. ... Limerence, as posited by psychologist Dorothy Tennov, is an involuntary cognitive and emotional state in which a person feels an intense romantic desire for another person (the limerent object). ... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... In the past century, the term pederasty has seen a number of different uses. ... The psychology of monogamy deals with the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that commonly occur in monogamous relationships. ... This article is about sex acts and practices (i. ... Legal separation is a possible step towards divorce under United States law. ... A widow is a woman whose spouse has died. ...

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Platonic love in its modern popular sense is an affectionate relationship into which the sexual element does not enter, especially in cases where one might easily assume otherwise. A simple example of platonic relationships is a deep, non-sexual friendship between two heterosexual people of the opposite sexes. A kiss can express affection. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Friendship is a term used to denote co-operative and supportive behaviour between two or more humans. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


At the same time, this interpretation is a misunderstanding of the nature of the Platonic ideal of love, which from its origin was that of a chaste but passionate love, based not on lack of interest but on spiritual transmutation of the sex force, opening up vast expanses of subtler enjoyments than sex. In its original Platonic form, this love was meant to bring the lovers closer to wisdom and the Platonic Form of Beauty. It is described in depth in Plato's Phaedrus and Symposium. In the Phaedrus, it is said to be a form of divine madness that is a gift from the gods, and that its proper expression is rewarded by the gods in the afterlife; in the Symposium, the method by which love takes one to the form of beauty and wisdom is detailed. Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ... Love is any of a number of emotions and experiences related to a sense of strong affection or profound oneness. ... Sexual abstinence or chastity is the practice of voluntarily refraining from sexual intercourse and (usually) other sexual activity. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Phaedrus, written by Plato, is a dialogue between Platos main protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues. ... The Symposium is a dialogue by Plato, written soon after 385 BCE. It is a philosophical discussion on the nature of love, taking the form of a series of speeches, both satirical and serious, given by a group of men at a symposion or drinking party at the house of...

Contents

History

The term amor platonicus was coined as early as the 15th Century by the Florentine scholar Marsilio Ficino as a synonym for amor socraticus. Both expressions signify a love focused on the beauty of a person's character and intelligence rather than on their physical charms. They refer to the special bond of affection between two men Plato had highlighted in a dialogue, and exemplified by the affection between Socrates and his young male pupils, in particular to the one between Socrates and Alcibiades. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Florence (Italian: ) is the capital city of the region of Tuscany, Italy. ... Domenico Ghirlandaio. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... These are Platos known dialogues. ... Socrates (Greek: , invariably anglicized as , Sǒcratēs; circa 470–399 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher who is widely credited for laying the foundation for Western philosophy. ... Alcibiades Cleiniou Scambonides (Greek: ; English /ælsɪbaɪədi:z/; 450 BC–404 BC), also transliterated as Alkibiades, was a prominent Athenian statesman, orator, and general. ...


The English term dates back as far as Sir William Davenant's Platonic Lovers (1636). It is derived from the concept in Plato's Symposium of the love of the idea of good which lies at the root of all virtue and truth. For a brief period, Platonic love was a fashionable subject at the English royal court, especially in the circle around Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of King Charles I. Platonic love was the theme of some of the courtly masques performed in the Caroline era—though the fashion soon waned under pressures of social and political change. William Davenant Sir William Davenant (February 28, 1606 - April 7, 1668), also spelled DAvenant, was an English poet and playwright. ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... The Symposium is a dialogue by Plato, written soon after 385 BCE. It is a philosophical discussion on the nature of love, taking the form of a series of speeches, both satirical and serious, given by a group of men at a symposion or drinking party at the house of... Queen Henrietta Maria (November 25, 1609 – September 10, 1669) was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland (June 13, 1625 - January 30, 1649) through her marriage to Charles I. The U.S. state of Maryland (in Latin, Terra Mariae) was so named in her honour by Cæcilius Calvert, son... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Costume for a Knight, by Inigo Jones: the plumed helmet, the heroic torso in armour and other conventions were still employed for opera seria in the 18th century. ... The Caroline era refers to a period in English and Scottish history that coincides with the reign of Charles I (1625—1642). ...


Paradox

Ironically, the very eponym of this love, Plato, as well as the forementioned Socrates and Ficino, all belonged to the community of men who desired boys, and they all engaged in erotic pedagogic friendships with youths. The concept of platonic love thus arose within the context of the debate pitting mundane sexually expressed pederasty against the philosophic – or chaste – pederasty elaborated in Plato's writings (Symposium, Phaedro, Laws, and others). An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, which has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery or other item. ... The term pederasty or paederasty embraces a wide range of erotic practices between adult and adolescents, generally between males. ...

Plato and his companions.

Regarding Socrates, John Addington Symonds in his A Problem in Greek Ethics states that he "...avows a fervent admiration for beauty in the persons of young men. At the same time he declares himself upon the side of temperate and generous affection, and strives to utilize the erotic enthusiasm as a motive power in the direction of philosophy." According to Linda Rapp, Ficino, by platonic love, meant "...a relationship that included both the physical and the spiritual. Thus, Ficino's view is that love is the desire for beauty, which is the image of the divine."[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (830x688, 91 KB) sv: Plato i sin akademi, av Carl Johan Wahlbom en: Plato in his academy, drawing after a painting by Swedish painter Carl Johan Wahlbom Source: Svenska Familj-Journalen File links The following pages link to this file: Platonic... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (830x688, 91 KB) sv: Plato i sin akademi, av Carl Johan Wahlbom en: Plato in his academy, drawing after a painting by Swedish painter Carl Johan Wahlbom Source: Svenska Familj-Journalen File links The following pages link to this file: Platonic... John Addington Symonds was the name of a father and son, both English writers. ...


Because of the common modern definition, platonic love can be seen as paradoxical in light of these philosophers' life experiences and teachings. Plato and his peers did not teach that a man's relationship with a youth should lack an erotic dimension, but rather that the longing for the beauty of the boy is a foundation of the friendship and love between those two. However, having acknowledged that the man's erotic desire for the youth magnetizes and energizes the relationship, they countered that it is wiser for this eros to not be sexually expressed, but instead be redirected into the intellectual and emotional spheres. Eroticism is an aesthetic focused on sexual desire, especially the feelings of anticipation of sexual activity. ...


To resolve this confusion, French scholars found it helpful to distinguish between amour platonique (the concept of non-sexual love) and amour platonicien (love according to Plato). When the term "Platonic love" is used today, it generally does not describe this aspect of Plato's views of love.


The understanding that Platonic love could be interpreted as masculine eros is alleged by some socio-historical critics to be linked with the social construction of a homosexual identity[citation needed], and the cultural model of platonic friendship / pederasty was supposedly used by educated gay men since the early Renaissance[citation needed]. Social constructionism or social constructivism is a sociological theory of knowledge based on Hegels ideas, and developed by Durkheim at the turn of the century. ...

Alcibiades – beloved of Socrates, a love given as an example of what was later named Platonic love
Alcibiades – beloved of Socrates, a love given as an example of what was later named Platonic love

Image File history File links Alcibiades_from_www-livius-org. ... Image File history File links Alcibiades_from_www-livius-org. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Gould, T. (1963) Platonic Love. New York: The Free Press.
  1. ^ "Linda Rapp in glbtq"

Yachiru > Kenpachi from Bleach Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


External link

  • Plato's Theory of Love

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Platonic love - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (660 words)
Platonic love in its modern popular sense is an affectionate relationship into which the sexual element does not enter, especially in cases where one might easily assume otherwise.
At the same time, this interpretation is a misunderstanding of the nature of the Platonic ideal of love, which from its origin was that of a chaste but passionate love, based not on uninterest but virtuous restraint.
The understanding that Platonic love could be interpreted as masculine eros, albeit unconsummated, is intimately linked with the construction of a homosexual identity, and the cultural model of platonic friendship / pederasty was used by educated gay men since the early Renaissance.
Plato’s theory of Love: Rationality as Passion (6469 words)
Love is a remedy for an ancient wound inflicted on us by the gods, who divided us in two as a punishment for our arrogance.
But although all things love, and all men are in some sense lovers, few recognise the object of their love, that which motivates their striving, that which underlies their every desire, that which will ensure ‘perpetual possession’.
Plato’s view of love as love of immortality, and love of immortality as the key to parental love can be helpful in discussing parental love, its ambitions, its shortcomings, especially the feasibility of its ideal unconditionality.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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