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Encyclopedia > Plantation economy

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Anglo-Saxon economy or Anglo-Saxon capitalism (so called because it is largely practiced in English speaking countries such as Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States) is a capitalist macroeconomic model in which levels of regulation and taxes are low, and the quality of state services and social... The American School, also known as National System, represents three different yet related things in politics, policy and philosophy. ... The rise of technology has allowed our environment to be characterized as a global one. ... In anthropology, the hunter-gatherer way of life is that led by certain societies of the Neolithic Era based on the exploitation of wild plants and animals. ... Information economy is a loosely defined term to characterize an economy with increased role of informational activities and information industry. ... Countries currently considered NICs. ... A palace economy is a system of economic organisation in which wealth flows out from a central source (the palace), eventually reaching the common people, who have no other source of income. ... A token economy is a system of behavior modification based on the principles of operant conditioning. ... A traditional economy is an economic system in which resources are allocated by inheritance, and which has a strong social network and is based on primitive methods and tools. ... A transition economy is an economy which is changing from a planned economy to a free market. ...

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A plantation economy is an economy which is based on agricultural mass production, usually of a few staple products grown on large farms called plantations. Plantation economies are usually dependent on outside forces, due to the fact that the products being harvested en masse are cash crops to be exported. Image File history File links Portal. ... Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ... In agriculture, a cash crop is a crop which is sold for money. ...


Throughout history, countries with plantation economies have usually been in South America, the Caribbean, and Africa, and usually during the historical period of colonization, though Fordlândia is a 20th century example[citation needed]. Plantation economies are also historically associated with slavery, particularly in the United States. Plantation economies usually benefit the large countries to which they are exporting; they usually take the raw materials grown on the plantation and return manufactured goods, making a profit. Throughout most of history, the countries receiving the crops have usually been in Western Europe. South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Fordlândia (Ford-land) was a vast tract of land purchased by American automobile tycoon Henry Ford in the 1920s. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Slave redirects here. ... The borders of Western Europe were largely defined by the Cold War. ...

Contents

Tobacco plantations in Colonial Virginia

Tobacco production was labor intensive and required thousands of slaves to produce millions of pounds that were exported. The period covered by this article ranges from 1700 to the end of the American Civil War (1865). Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The wealth and Influence of the so-called "tuckahoe" Virginia planters depended on one crop, and that crop was tobacco. The production of tobacco spread down the James, York, Rappahannock, and the Potomac rivers. Tuckahoe was a term used during the 18th and 19th centuries to describe a cultural group, i. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... The York River is a navigable estuary, approximately 40 mi (64 km) long, in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... The Rappahannock at sunset The Rappahannock River is a river in eastern Virginia in the United States, approximately 184 mi (294 km). ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ...


Tobacco and Virginia economy

Over the years tobacco contributed greatly to Virginia’s economy. In the year 1758 Virginia exported 70,000 hogsheads of tobacco. The production of tobacco in colonial times required much toil. The plants had to be grown from seeds in a cold frame, set out, weeded, tasseled, harvested, and cured. All of this work was done by man and beast. Each acre produced about 5,000 plants that required hand care over and over again. But, with slave labor, profits exceeded any other plant that could be grown.[1] Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A hogshead is a large cask of liquid (less often, of a food commodity). ... A traditional home made cold frame In agriculture and gardening, a cold frame is a transparent-roofed enclosure, built low to the ground, used to protect plants from cold weather. ...


Slave statistics

In the year 1860, one out of every four families in Virginia owned slaves. The figures cited here are from the 1860 census. There were over 100 plantation owners that owned over 100 slaves.[2] 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...

Slave being inspected
Slave being inspected
Tobacco field
Tobacco field
  • Number of slaves in the Lower South : 2,312,352 (47% of total population).
  • Number of slaves in the Upper South: 1,208,758 (29% of total population).
  • Number of slaves in the Border States: 432,586 (13% of total population).

Less than one-third of all Southern families owned slaves at the peak of slavery prior to the Civil War. In Mississippi and South Carolina it approached one half. The total number of slave owners was 385,000 (including, in Louisiana, some free Negroes). On a typical plantation (more than 20 slaves), the capital value of the slaves was greater than the capital value of the land and implements. Image File history File links Slaveacp. ... Image File history File links Slaveacp. ... Tobacco plants From http://www. ... Tobacco plants From http://www. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For an island of the Philippines, see Negros. ...


Tobacco plantation owners

Many of the wealthy and influential men in Colonial Virginia were tobacco plantation owners. A number of America's first presidents owned slaves. They owned numerous plantations, each with large numbers of slaves.


George Washington

A planter’s wealth was measured by the number of slaves he owned, and George Washington was a wealthy man. Without adequate tobacco farming, George Washington's campaign against the English would have been under-financed. Tobacco planters found that slave labor produced the greatest tobacco profits. In Virginia, the black population increased from about 25% of the population in 1660 to more than 40% by 1760.[3] Of the 277 slaves belonging to Washington in his own right or by marriage, 179 were 12 years old or older, eighteen of whom were "Passed labor."[4] George Washington’s father (Poppa George) owned the Popes Creek plantation. Slaves sold for 30-35 pounds. When his father died in 1743 he owned 64 slaves who were distributed across several estates.[5] George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Thomas Jefferson

In 1776 Thomas Jefferson took a census of the slaves in his “family.” He documented, in his “Farm Book”, 117 slaves who lived on his plantation. He continued to acquire slaves at Monticello until the total was 140. Some were thought to be his own children. (3) Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


Robert “King” Carter

By the year 1700, Robert "King” Carter was the richest man in the Virginia colony. He owned nearly 300,000 acres (1,200 km²) scattered across the Northern Neck of Virginia. His tobacco plantations were tilled by about 1500 African slaves. The tobacco produced by “King” Carter was stored in his own warehouses, and he purchased tobacco from other planters as well. He owned the ships that transported the tobacco to Europe where family members profited from its sale. The same ships were also stocked with trading goods, and sailed down to Africa, where the goods were traded for slaves that were brought back to Virginia.[6] Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Robert Carter also known as King Carter (1663 – August 4, 1732) was a colonist in Virginia and had become one of the wealthiest men in the colonies. ... The Northern Neck is the northernmost of three peninsulas on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, USA. This peninsula is bounded by the Potomac River on the north and the Rappahannock River on the south. ...


James Madison

President James Madison was also a slave holder all of his adult life. Slavery remained a moral dilemma for him[citation needed]. Financial difficulties late in life led Madison to sell some slaves and he decided against freeing his slaves upon his death in order to provide for his wife's later years. James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ...


Sugar plantations

The system of sugar plantations in the Caribbean islands and Brazil was a system that had to be followed to an exact science in order to profit from the production. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ...


The slaves working the sugar plantation were caught in an unceasing rhythm of arduous labor year after year. Sugarcane is harvested about 18 months after planting and the plantations usually divided their land for efficiency. One plot was lying fallow, one plot was growing cane, and the final plot was being harvested. During the May-December rainy season, slaves planted, fertilized with animal dung, and weeded. From January to June, they harvested the cane by chopping the plants off close to the ground, stripping the leaves, then cutting them into shorter strips to be bundled off to be sent to the mill. Slave redirects here. ...


In the mill, the cane was crushed using a three roller mill. The juice from the crushing of the cane was then boiled or clarified until it crystallized into sugar. Some plantations also went a step further and distilled the molasses (the liquid left after the sugar is boiled or clarified) to make rum. The sugar was then shipped back to Europe, and for the slave laborer the routine started all over again. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


See also

Banana republic Banana Republic is a chain of clothing stores owned by Gap Inc. ...


References

  1. ^ Tobacco in Virginia. Retrieved on 2006-03-24.
  2. ^ PBS The Slaves' Story. Retrieved on 2006-03-24.
  3. ^ How slavery helped build the economy. Retrieved on 2006-03-24.
  4. ^ The will of George Washington. Retrieved on 2006-03-24.
  5. ^ Slavery at Popes Plantation. Retrieved on 2006-03-24.
  6. ^ The wealthy Carter family. Retrieved on 2006-03-21.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Plantation economy (146 words)
Plantation economies are usually dependant on outside forces, due to the fact that the products being harvested are cash crops to be exported.
Plantation economies are also historically associated with slavery, particularly in the United States.
Plantation economies usually benefit the large countries to which they are exporting; they usually take the raw materials grown on the plantation and return manufactured goods, making a profit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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