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Encyclopedia > Plainsong

Broadly speaking, plainsong is the name given to the body of traditional songs used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church. The liturgies of the Orthodox Church, though in many ways similar, are generally not classified as plainsong, though the musical form is nearly as old as Christendom itself. From the Greek word λειτουργια, which can be transliterated as leitourgia, meaning the work of the people, a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... Several Christian Churches or church bodies are commonly referred to as Orthodox. Most of them are identifiable as part of Eastern Christianity. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus of Nazareth, known by Christians as Jesus Christ, as recounted in the New Testament. ...


Plainsong is monophonic, and is in free rather than measured rhythm. Gregorian chant is a variety of plainsong that is named after Pope Gregory I (6th century AD). However, it is a myth that Gregory invented the chant, or that he ordered the suppression of previous chant styles, such as the Ambrosian or Mozarabic. For several centuries, different plainchant styles existed concurrently, and standardization on Gregorian chant was not completed, even in Italy until the 12th century. Plainchant represents the first revival of musical notation after knowledge of the ancient Greek system was lost. Plainsong notation differs from the modern system in having only four lines to the staff and a system of note-shapes called neumes. In music, the word texture is often used in a rather vague way in reference to the overall sound of a piece of music. ... Gregorian chant is also known as plainchant or plainsong and is a form of monophonic, unaccompanied singing, which was developed in the Catholic church, mainly during the period 800-1000. ... Pope Saint Gregory I or Gregory the Great (ca. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Mozarabic was a continuum of closely related Iberian Romance dialects spoken in Muslim dominated areas of the Iberian Peninsula during the early stages of Romance languages development in Iberia. ... Music notation is a system of writing for music. ... Neumes are the basic elements of Western and Eastern systems of musical notation prior to the invention of staff notation. ...


There was a significant plainsong revival in the 19th century AD when much work was done to restore the correct notation and performance-style of the old plainsong collections, notably by the monks of the Abbaye de Solesmes in Northern France. The use of plainsong is now mostly confined to the Monastic Orders. In the late 1980s, plainchant achieved a certain vogue as music for relaxation, and several recordings of plainchant became "classical chart hits". Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Solesmes (St-Pierre-de-Solesmes), a Benedictine abbey near Sablé, in the Sarthe department in France, founded in 1010. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ...


External links

  • OCM plainsong

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Plainsong - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (275 words)
Broadly speaking, plainsong is the name given to the body of traditional songs used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church.
Plainsong is monophonic, and is in free rather than measured rhythm.
There was a significant plainsong revival in the 19th century AD when much work was done to restore the correct notation and performance-style of the old plainsong collections, notably by the monks of the Abbaye de Solesmes in Northern France.
HEREFOL4 TEXT (1257 words)
Ferthermore it is to wete that of al the cordis of descaunt summe be aboue the plainsong and summe benethe and summe with the plainsong.
Of the whech countertenor thes be the 4 syghtis benethe plainsong: a 8te, a 6te, a 5te, a 3de and vnisoun euyn with the plainson; and aboue the plainsong othir 4: a 3, a 5te, a 6te, a 8te.
Nou is this sight alterid; for whereas ferst euyn with the plainsong whas your 5te in voise, nou is your 12e and whereas was the 2e benethe the plainsong in voice your 6te, nou is your 13e and whereas was the 4e benethe the plainsong your 8te, nou is your 15e.
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