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Encyclopedia > Plague doctor
Doktor Schnabel von Rom ("Doctor Beak of Rome"), engraving by Paul Fürst, 1656
Doktor Schnabel von Rom ("Doctor Beak of Rome"), engraving by Paul Fürst, 1656

During the period of the Black Death and the Great Plague of London, plague doctors visited victims of the plague to verify whether they had been afflicted or not, take their pay, and leave. Most were unqualified to do even this, as the qualified doctors fled, knowing they could do nothing for those affected by the plague.[citation needed] Their outfit consisted of a hat to show that the man was a doctor, a mask to protect the face which included crystal eyes to protect the wearer's eyes and the beak which was stuffed with spices or herbs to purify the air that the doctor breathed, a wooden stick to push away victims who would get too close to him, a pair of leather gloves to protect the hands, a gown waxed from the exterior, and full length boots. It was believed at the time that the plague was spread only through the air and not through the flea bites of the fleas living on the black rat. This was why the doctors stuffed herbs and spices in their masks or carried them somewhere on their person. The waxed clothing may have helped prevent fleas latching on and even prevented respitory droplet infection. This outfit might not have been worn often, as most of the doctors fled at the earliest signs of plague. Doktor Schnabel von Rom (Doctor Beak from Rome) engraving, Rome 1656 Credit(s): Paul Fürst (after J Columbina) Source: Imagery From the History of Medicine The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with... Doktor Schnabel von Rom (Doctor Beak from Rome) engraving, Rome 1656 Credit(s): Paul Fürst (after J Columbina) Source: Imagery From the History of Medicine The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411) The Black Death, or Black Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history. ... poop poop poop A bill of mortality for the plague year of 1665. ... Bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease, plague, which is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... A leather glove is a fitted covering for the hand with a separate sheath for each finger and the thumb, and this covering is composed of the tanned hide of an animal (with the hair removed), though it is not uncommon in recent years for the leather to be synthetic. ... Binomial name Rattus rattus (Linnaeus, 1758) Black Rat range The Black Rat (Rattus rattus, also known as the Asian black rat, ship rat, roof rat or house rat) is a common long-tailed rodent of the genus Rattus (Old World rodents) and the subfamily murinae (murine rodents). ...


References

Plague Doctor


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bubonic plague - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2933 words)
Plague is endemic in many countries in Africa, in the former Soviet Union, the Americas and Asia.
Plague is primarily a disease of rodents, particularly marmots (in which the most virulent strains of plague are primarily found), but also fl rats, prairie dogs, chipmunks, squirrels and other similar large rodents.
Plague continued to strike parts of Europe throughout the 14th century, the 15th century and the 16th century with varying degrees of intensity and fatality.
templateeliz (1624 words)
This particular type of plague was the bubonic plague, which is caused by the bacteria called Yersinia pests.
The symptoms associated with plague are bubos, which are painful swellings of the lymph nodes.
The Great Plague, later to be known as the Black Death, within a span of four years (1347-1350) destroyed a quarter to a half of the population of Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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