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Encyclopedia > Pixel geometry

The components of the pixels (primary colors red, green and blue) in an image sensor or display can be ordered in different patterns, called pixel geometry.


The geometric arrangement of the primary colors within a pixel varies depending on usage (see figure 1). In monitors, such as LCDs or CRTs, that typically display edges or rectangles, the components are arranged in vertical stripes. Displays with motion pictures should instead have triangular or diagonal patterns so that the image variation is perceived better by the viewer.

a) Triangular       b) Stripes       c) Diagonal      
Figure 1. Geometrical layouts for primary colors in a pixel.      

Knowledge of the pixel geometry used by a display may be used to create raster images of higher apparent resolution. See subpixel rendering.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Liquid crystal display - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1848 words)
Each pixel (picture element) consists of a column of liquid crystal molecules suspended between two transparent electrodes, and two polarizing filters, the axes of polarity of which are perpendicular to each other.
In color LCDs each individual pixel is divided into three cells, or subpixels, which are colored red, green, and blue, respectively, by additional filters.
Color components may be arrayed in various pixel geometries, depending on the monitor's usage.
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