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Encyclopedia > Pity
Emotions

Acceptance
Affection
Aggression
Ambivalence
Anger
Apathy
Anxiety
Compassion
Confusion
Depression
Disgust
Doubt
Ecstasy
Empathy
Envy
Embarrassment
Euphoria
Fear
Forgiveness
Frustration
Guilt
Gratitude
Grief
Happiness
Hatred
Hope
Horror
Hostility
Homesickness
Hysteria
Loneliness
Love
Paranoia
Pity
Pleasure
Pride
Rage
Regret
Remorse
Sadness
Shame
Suffering
Surprise
Sympathy
Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... Shortcut: WP:CU Marking articles for cleanup This page is undergoing a transition to an easier-to-maintain format. ... This Manual of Style has the simple purpose of making things easy to read by following a consistent format — it is a style guide. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... For other uses, see Emotion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Acceptance (disambiguation). ... For the change in vowel and consonant quality in Celtic languages, see Affection (linguistics). ... In psychology and other social and behavioral sciences, aggression refers to behavior that is intended to cause harm or pain. ... Look up ambivalence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the emotion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... what up?? Anxiety is a physiological state characterized by cognitive, somatic, emotional, and behavioral components (Seligman, Walker & Rosenhan, 2001). ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... Look up Confusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Confusion can have the following meanings: Unclarity or puzzlement, e. ... In everyday language depression refers to any downturn in mood, which may be relatively transitory and perhaps due to something trivial. ... A woman showing disgust. ... This article is about the mental state. ... Ecstasy is a category of altered states of consciousness or trancelike states in which an individual transcends ordinary consciousness and as a result has a heightened capacity for exceptional thought, intense concentration on a specific task, extraordinary physical abilities or intense emotional experience. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ... Embarrassment is an unpleasant emotional state experienced upon having a socially or professionally unacceptable act or condition witnessed by or revealed to others. ... Euphoria (Greek ) is a medically recognized emotional state related to happiness. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Forgiveness (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... “Thanks” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Anticipatory Grief be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Happiness (disambiguation). ... For the emotion Hatred please see Hate Hatred (Nenavist) is a Soviet film of 1975 directed by Samvel Gasparov. ... For other uses, see Hope (disambiguation). ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... Anger is a term for the emotional aspect of aggression, as a basic aspect of the stress response in animals whereby a perceived aggravating stimulus provokes a counterresponse which is likewise aggravating and threatening of violence. ... Homesickness is generally described as a feeling of longing for ones familiar surroundings. ... Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. ... Loneliness is an emotional state in which a person experiences a powerful feeling of emptiness and isolation. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Look up Pleasure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pride is the name of an emotion which refers to a strong sense of self-respect, a refusal to be humiliated as well as joy in the accomplishments of oneself or a person, group, nation or object that one identifies with. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Regret is often felt when someone feels sadness, shame, or guilt and primarily regret after commiting an action that the person later wishes that they had not done. ... People feel remorse when reflecting on their actions that they believe are wrong. ... In everyday language depression refers to any downturn in mood, which may be relatively transitory and perhaps due to something trivial. ... For other uses, see Shame (disambiguation). ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... Wide eyes are a common human physiological expression of emotional surprise. ... ...

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Pity by William Blake

Pity, as in the Merriam-Webster dictionary, implies tender or sometimes slightly contemptuous sorrow for one in misery or distress as in "The media treat victims with condescending pity". By the nineteenth century, two different kinds of pity had come to be distinguished, which we might call "benevolent pity" and "contemptuous pity" (see Kimball). David Hume observed that pity which has in it a strong mixture of good-will, is nearly allied to contempt, which is a species of dislike, with a mixture of pride. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Pity is an emotion that almost always results from an encounter with a real or perceived unfortunate, injured, or pathetic creature.[citation needed] A person experiencing pity will experience a combination of intense sorrow and mercy for the person or creature, often giving the pitied some kind of aid, physical help, and/or financial assistance.[citation needed] Although pity may be confused with compassion, empathy, commiseration, condolence or sympathy. These all mean the act or capacity for sharing the painful feelings of another, however pity is different from any of these. For other uses, see Emotion (disambiguation). ... Look up sorrow in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Mercy (disambiguation). ... Look up Aid in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... ...


In regards to humans, pity may be felt towards the homeless, orphans, people with disabilities, those with terminal illness, and especially victims of rape and torture, by non-sufferers of these and similar things. Because pity will often result in the pitier aiding the pitied, some people equate pity with sympathy and assume, therefore, that pity is naturally a positive thing. However, the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche believed that pity causes an otherwise normal person to feel his or her own suffering in an inappropriately intense, alienated way. "Pity makes suffering contagious," he says in The Antichrist, meaning that it is important for the pitier not to allow him/herself to feel superior to the pitied, lest such a power imbalance result in the pitied retaliating against the help being offered. A homeless person in Paris. ... Orphans, by Thomas Kennington An orphan (from the Greek ορφανός) is a person (typically a child), who has lost both parents, often through death. ... The term disability, as it is applied to humans, refers to any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods. ... This article is about incurable disease. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher. ... Normality can mean Normality (chemistry) Normality (statistics) Used in the English language: Being normal. ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... Look up alienation, alienate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Superior has various meanings: A superior is a person who has the authority to command another, as in a superior officer. See: Superior (function) In a hierarchical structure of any kind, a superior is higher in the hierarchy and thus closer to the apex than the subordinate ones. ... social stratification is the division of people of a particular society on the basis if occupation, income, power, prestige, authority, status, dignity, education, class, castle, gender, race and ethnicity In sociology, social stratification is the hierarchical arrangement of social classes, castes and strata within a society. ... Revenge is retaliation against a person or group in response to wrongdoing. ...


Nietzsche pointed out that since all people to some degree value self-esteem and self-worth, pity can negatively affect any situation. Additionally, pity may actually be psychologically harmful to the pitied: Self-pity and depression can sometimes be the result of the power imbalance fostered by pity, sometimes with extremely negative psychological and psycho-social consequences for the pitied party. In psychology, self-esteem or self-worth is a persons self-image at an emotional level; circumventing reason and logic. ... In psychology, self-esteem or self-worth is a persons self-image at an emotional level; circumventing reason and logic. ... Psychology (ancient Greek: psyche = soul and logos = word) is the study of behaviour, mind and thought. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ...


Nietzsche's view as described has been copied by other philosophers and social scientists [citation needed] and is particularly felt by the worldwide disabled population working for Inclusion; these activists have adopted the slogan "Piss on pity" as a confrontational counterbalance to pity. The term disability, as it is applied to humans, refers to any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods. ... Inclusion is a term used by activist people with disabilities and other disability rights advocates for the idea that human beings should freely, openly and happily accommodate any other human being that happens to be differently-abled without question or qualification of any kind. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Piss on Pity is a political slogan and a rallying cry for advocates of Inclusion. ... Confrontation is a tactical tabletop fantasy wargame in which the combatants are represented by metal figures in 28-30mm scale. ...


Though in his later works he reverses his position and sees Pity as an emotion that can draw beings together, Mystic poet William Blake is known to have been ambivalent about the emotion Pity. In The Book of Urizen Pity begins when Los looks on the body of Urizen bound in chains (Urizen 13.50-51). However, Pity furthers the fall, "For pity divides the soul" (13.53), dividing Los and Enitharmon (Enitharmon is named Pity at her birth). Analyzers of this work assert that Blake shows that "Pity defuses the power of righteous indignation and proper prophetic wrath that lead to action. Pity is a distraction; the soul is divided between it and the action a 'pitiable' state demands. This is seen as Los's division into active male and tearful female, the latter deluding the former." Again railing against Pity in The Human Abstract, Blake exclaims: "Pity would be no more, / If we did not make somebody Poor" (1-2). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... The Book of Urizen is one of the major prophetic books of the English poet William Blake. ...


Further reading

  • Robert H. Kimball, A Plea for Pity - Philosophy and Rhetoric 37:4
  • David Hume, An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, in his Enquires concerning Human Understanding and concerning the Principles of Morals. ed. L.A. Selby-Bigge, 3rd ed. P.H. Nidditch (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975 [1st]) Sec. VI Part II, p.248, n.1. pub. 1751
  • Stephen Tudor, Compassion and Remorse: Acknowledging the Suffering Other

See also

Look up pity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pitys * People, Places, & Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant (226 words)
Pitys * People, Places, and Things * Greek Mythology: From the Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant
P to Peitho Pelasgians to Phaedrias Phaeo to Pitys Plataea to Polyphemos 2 Polyxena to Pyxis 2
The nymph who resisted the affection of Pan (the Goat-God) and was transformed into a pine tree.
Pan (mythology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1121 words)
Pan also loved a nymph named Pitys, who was turned into a pine tree to escape him.
He was believed by the Greeks to have plied his charms primarily on maidens and shepherds, such as Daphnis.
Though he failed with Syrinx and Pitys, Pan didn't fail with the Maenads—he had every one of them, in one orgiastic riot or another.
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