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Encyclopedia > Piroxicam
Piroxicam
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(8E)-8-[hydroxy-(pyridin-2-ylamino)methylidene]-
9-methyl-10,10-dioxo-10λ6-thia-9-azabicyclo[4.4.0]
deca-1,3,5-trien-7-one
Identifiers
CAS number 36322-90-4
ATC code M01AC01 M02AA07, S01BC06
PubChem 5280452
DrugBank APRD01187
Chemical data
Formula C15H13N3O4S 
Mol. mass 331.348 g/mol
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Metabolism 4 to 10% renal
Half life 30 to 86 hours
Excretion 4 to 10% renal
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.

C, D if used in the third trimester or near delivery Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... IUPAC nomenclature is a system of naming chemical compounds and of describing the science of chemistry in general. ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System is used for the classification of drugs. ... A section of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. ... A section of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. ... A section of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. ... PubChem is a database of chemical molecules. ... The DrugBank database available at the University of Alberta is a unique bioinformatics and cheminformatics resource that combines detailed drug (i. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... General Name, Symbol, Number carbon, C, 6 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 14, 2, p Appearance black (graphite) colorless (diamond) Standard atomic weight 12. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... General Name, Symbol, Number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, Period, Block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... General Name, Symbol, Number sulfur, S, 16 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16, 3, p Appearance lemon yellow Standard atomic weight 32. ... The molecular mass (abbreviated Mr) of a substance, formerly also called molecular weight and abbreviated as MW, is the mass of one molecule of that substance, relative to the unified atomic mass unit u (equal to 1/12 the mass of one atom of carbon-12). ... In pharmacology, bioavailability is used to describe the fraction of an administered dose of unchanged drug that reaches the systemic circulation, one of the principal pharmacokinetic properties of drugs. ... Drug metabolism is the metabolism of drugs, their biochemical modification or degradation, usually through specialized enzymatic systems. ... The kidneys are organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ... It has been suggested that Effective half-life be merged into this article or section. ... Excretion is the process of eliminating waste products of metabolism and other materials that are of no use. ... The pregnancy category of a pharmaceutical agent is an assessment of the risk of fetal injury due to the pharmaceutical, if it is used as directed by the mother during pregnancy. ...

Legal status
Routes  ?

Piroxicam (marketed in the U.S. under the trade name Feldene) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used to relieve the symptoms of Rheumatoid and Osteoarthritis, primary dysmenorrhoea, Post Operative Pain; and act as an analgesic, especially where there is an inflammatory component. It is also used in veterinary medicine to treat certain neoplasias expressing cyclooxygenase (COX) receptors, such as bladder, colon, and prostate cancers. The regulation of therapeutic goods, that is drugs and therapeutic devices, varies by jurisdiction. ... In pharmacology and toxicology, a route of administration is the path by which a drug, fluid, poison or other substance is brought into contact with the body 1. ... Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects - they reduce pain, fever and inflammation. ... Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... Dysmenorrhea (or dysmenorrhoea), cramps or painful menstruation, involves menstrual periods that are accompanied by either sharp, intermittent pain or dull, aching pain, usually in the pelvis or lower abdomen. ... An analgesic (colloquially known as a painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain (achieve analgesia). ... An abscess on the skin, showing the redness and swelling characteristic of inflammation. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... Neoplasia (new growth in Greek) is abnormal proliferation of cells in a tissue or organ. ... Cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme (EC 1. ... In anatomy, the urinary bladder is a hollow, muscular, and distensible (or elastic) organ that sits on the pelvic floor in mammals. ... For the article about the punctuation symbol, see Colon (punctuation). ... The prostate is a compound tubuloalveolar exocrine gland of the male mammalian reproductive system. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


Mechanism of action

Main article: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Piroxicam is an NSAID and, as such, is a non-selective COX inhibitor possessing both analgesic and antipyretic properties. It undergoes entero-hepatic circulation. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects - they reduce pain, fever and inflammation. ... Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects - they reduce pain, fever and inflammation. ... Cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme (EC 1. ...


Adverse effects

Main article: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

Piroxicam use can result in gastrointestinal toxicity, tinnitus, dizziness, headache, rash, and pruritus. The most severe adverse reactions are peptic ulceration and gastrointestinal bleeding. Approximately 30% of all patients receiving daily doses of 20 mg of piroxicam experience side effects.[1]
Doctors in the USA do not like Piroxicam due to possible law suits but if this is the only drug that works for you (i.e. for gout) press for it and sign a disclaimer if needed.
Piroxicam may cause your skin to become more sensitive to sunlight. Try to avoid sunlight (UV) and use a sun protection cream until you know how your skin reacts.
The pack will come with a long list of possible unwanted side effects. Daily doses range from 10mg to 40mg in most cases. Due to the above adverse effects, start will a lower dose (use a pill spliter if required) and work up to daily doseage. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects - they reduce pain, fever and inflammation. ... For the Physics term GUT, please refer to Grand unification theory The gastrointestinal or digestive tract, also referred to as the GI tract or the alimentary canal or the gut, is the system of organs within multicellular animals which takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and... Tinnitus (IPA pronunciation: or ,[1] from the Latin word for ringing[2]) is the perception of sound in the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound(s). ... // Pre-syncope is a sensation of feeling faint. ... A headache (cephalalgia in medical terminology) is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache. ... A rash is a change in skin which affects its color, appearance or texture. ... An itch (Latin: pruritus) is a sensation felt on an area of skin that makes a person or animal want to scratch it. ... A benign gastric ulcer (from the antrum) of a gastrectomy specimen. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ New Zealand Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority. Candyl Medicines datasheet. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  • Links to external chemical sources

  Results from FactBites:
 
MedlinePlus Drug Information: Piroxicam (1221 words)
NSAIDs such as piroxicam may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine.
Piroxicam is used to relieve pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining of the joints) and rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of the joints).
Piroxicam is also sometimes used to treat gouty arthritis (attacks of severe joint pain and swelling caused by a build-up of certain substances in the joints) and ankylosing spondylitis (arthritis that mainly affects the spine).
Piroxicam (545 words)
Piroxicam is used in acute gout attacks and in cases of dysmenorrhoea.
In adults Piroxicam is administered orally in daily dose of 20 mg, given as a single daily dose or divided in two doses of 10 mg each.
Piroxicam has a high affinity to the plasma proteins and due to this fact the concurrent administration with coumarin anticoagulants, sulfonamides, nelidix acid, oral antidiabetic agents, triiodothyronine, cyclophosphamide, and digoxin can lead to an increase in their plasma levels.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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