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Encyclopedia > Pirates of Silicon Valley
Pirates of Silicon Valley
Directed by Martyn Burke
Produced by Leanne Moore
Written by Paul Freiberger,
Michael Swaine,
Martyn Burke
Starring Noah Wyle
Anthony Michael Hall
Joey Slotnick
John Di Maggio
Josh Hopkins
Distributed by Turner Network Television
Release date(s) June 20, 1999
Running time 95 min.
Language English
IMDb profile

Pirates of Silicon Valley (1999) is an unauthorized made-for-television docudrama written and directed by Martyn Burke. Based on the book, Fire in the Valley: The Making of The Personal Computer, by Paul Freiberger and Michael Swaine, this film documents the rise of the home computer (personal computer) through the rivalry between Apple Computer (Apple II and the Apple Macintosh) and Microsoft (MITS Altair, MS-DOS, IBM PC, and Windows). Image File history File links Movieposterposv. ... Martyn Burke (born 1947) is a journalist, screenwriter and novelist from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Martyn Burke (born 1947) is a journalist, screenwriter and novelist from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Noah Strausser Speer Wyle (born June 4, 1971; last name pronounced ) is an American TV and film actor, perhaps best known for his role as Dr. John Carter on the television drama ER. // Wyle, one of six children, was born in Hollywood, California, to Marjorie (Speer), a registered orthopedic head... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... Joey Slotnick, left, poses with Steve Wozniak. ... John DiMaggio (born September 4, 1968) is an American voice actor, and a native of North Plainfield, New Jersey, known primarily for playing the robot Bender in the 20th Century Fox animated series Futurama. ... William Josh Hopkins (b. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... It has been suggested that Drama Documentary be merged into this article or section. ... Martyn Burke (born 1947) is a journalist, screenwriter and novelist from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Children playing on a Amstrad CPC 464 in the 1980s. ... Apple Inc. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... The current version of the article or section is written like a magazine article instead of the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... Windows redirects here. ...


The central story of the film begins in the early 1970s and ends with a birthday toast in 1985 to Steve Jobs shortly before he was fired by CEO John Sculley from Apple Computer. Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was president of PepsiCo during the 1970s and early 1980s until he became CEO of Apple Computer on April 8, 1983. ... Apple Inc. ...

Contents

Plot (Structure)

Beginning on the campus of U.C. Berkeley during the period of the Free Speech Movement, the film juxtaposes the trials and tribulations of childhood friends Steve Jobs (Noah Wyle) and Steve Wozniak (Joey Slotnick), who would eventually form Apple Computer, and Harvard students Bill Gates (Anthony Hall) and Gates’ high school friends Steve Ballmer (John Di Maggio) and Paul Allen (Josh Hopkins), who would eventually form Microsoft. The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... The Free Speech Movement was a student protest which began in 1964 - 1965 on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley under the informal leadership of student Mario Savio and others. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... Noah Strausser Speer Wyle (born June 4, 1971; last name pronounced ) is an American TV and film actor, perhaps best known for his role as Dr. John Carter on the television drama ER. // Wyle, one of six children, was born in Hollywood, California, to Marjorie (Speer), a registered orthopedic head... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is a U.S. computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... Joey Slotnick, left, poses with Steve Wozniak. ... Apple Inc. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... Steven Anthony Ballmer (born March 24, 1956 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American businessman and has been the chief executive officer of Microsoft Corporation since January 2000. ... John DiMaggio (born September 4, 1968) is an American voice actor, and a native of North Plainfield, New Jersey, known primarily for playing the robot Bender in the 20th Century Fox animated series Futurama. ... For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ... William Josh Hopkins (b. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ...


Gates, Jobs, and Wozniak would drop out of college (Jobs was actually a Reed College student for a short term but this is not documented in the film;) Wozniak would later return to U.C. Berkeley in order to take part in the growing personal computer revolution. The film is told from the point of view of Wozniak and Ballmer. Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ...


Cast

[citation needed] Noah Strausser Speer Wyle (born June 4, 1971; last name pronounced ) is an American TV and film actor, perhaps best known for his role as Dr. John Carter on the television drama ER. // Wyle, one of six children, was born in Hollywood, California, to Marjorie (Speer), a registered orthopedic head... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... Michael Anthony Thomas Charles Hall (born April 14, 1968), known professionally as Anthony Michael Hall, is an American actor, producer and director who achieved stardom in several successful teen-oriented films of the 1980s. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Joey Slotnick, left, poses with Steve Wozniak. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is a U.S. computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... John DiMaggio (born September 4, 1968) is an American voice actor, and a native of North Plainfield, New Jersey, known primarily for playing the robot Bender in the 20th Century Fox animated series Futurama. ... Steven Anthony Ballmer (born March 24, 1956 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American businessman and has been the chief executive officer of Microsoft Corporation since January 2000. ... William Josh Hopkins (b. ... For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ... Gema Zamprogna (born May 24, 1976) is a Canadian actress. ... Harriv 09:43, 1 Feb 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Allan Royal (born 1944) is actor who is also credited name are and Alan Royal. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was president of PepsiCo during the 1970s and early 1980s until he became CEO of Apple Computer on April 8, 1983. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Henry Edward Roberts (born 1942) was the founder and president of Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) which built the Altair 8800, one of the very first hobbyist personal computers. ... Marc Worden is a Canadian actor, born on the 5 June 1976 in Toronto. ... Marcus Giamatti (born October 3, 1961 in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Quotations from film

  • We're here to make a dent in the universe. Otherwise, why even be here? We're creating a completely new consciousness, like an artist or a poet. That’s how you have to think of this. We're rewriting the history of human thought with what we're doing.

- Noah Wyle as Steve Jobs, during the filming of the famous 1984 television commercial A screenshot from the commercial. ...

- Steve Wozniak (Joey Slotnick) describing Steve Jobs (Noah Wyle) Depending on the context in which it is used, the word kilobyte may mean either 1,000 or 1,024 bytes. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... For other uses, see Karma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of the meaning of life. ...

  • Steve—it is Steve, right? You say this gadget of yours is for ordinary people. What on earth would ordinary people want with computers?

- Comment made to Joey Slotnick as Steve Wozniak (in reference to the Apple I computer, circa 1976) The Apple I was an early personal computer, and the first to combine a keyboard with a microprocessor and a connection to a monitor. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Steve, you've gotta give Daniel some stock!

- Steve Wozniak (Joey Slotnick) begging Steve Jobs (Noah Wyle) on a payphone (to do the right thing by disbursing Apple founders stock to friend and start up founder Daniel Kottke (Marcus Giamatti))

  • We're better than you are (pauses)[;] we have better stuff

- Noah Wyle as Steve Jobs, speaking to Anthony Michael Hall as Bill Gates Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ...

  • You don't get it, Steve. That doesn't matter.

- Gates' reply to the previous


Interviews

  • Steve Jobs and Bill Gates are the true revolutionaries of our time. Not the students who occupied the dean’s office in the late ’60s. Not the anti-war marchers who were determined to overthrow the establishment. Jobs and Gates are the ones who changed the way the world thinks, acts and communicates

– answer to the question: "Why did these two 'nerds' become icons?" in an interview with the director of the film, Martyn Burke [1] Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Martyn Burke (born 1947) is a journalist, screenwriter and novelist from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...

Joey Slotnick, left, poses with Steve Wozniak; Slotnick portrayed Wozniak in the film
Joey Slotnick, left, poses with Steve Wozniak; Slotnick portrayed Wozniak in the film

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 662 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (712 × 645 pixel, file size: 205 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 662 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (712 × 645 pixel, file size: 205 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Joey Slotnick, left, poses with Steve Wozniak. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is a U.S. computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ...

Soundtrack

The soundtrack consisted largely of 1970s and 1980s classic rock and disco. Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... This article is about the music genre. ...


Select songs

  • Bach — "Concerto in D Minor for Two Violins Vivace" (B.W.V. 1043)
  • Moody Blues — "Question", "Isn't Life Strange", and "Gemini Dream"

In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Guess Who is a Canadian rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba, that was one of the first to establish a major successful following in their own country while still residing there. ... For other uses, see Iron Butterfly (disambiguation). ... In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, released in 1968, is a 17-minute rock song by Iron Butterfly, released on their album In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, occupying the entire second side of the album. ... The James Gang was a rock band formed in Cleveland, Ohio in 1966. ... KC and the Sunshine Band is an American musical group. ... Get Down Tonight is a song released in 1975 on the eponymous album by the disco group KC and the Sunshine Band. ... The Moody Blues were originally a British rhythm and blues-based band; they later became best known for psychedelic music and early progressive rock. ... The Police are a three-piece rock band consisting of singer/bassist Sting (Gordon Sumner), guitarist Andy Summers, and drummer Stewart Copeland. ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ... This article is about the song made famous by Frank Sinatra. ... Talking Heads were an American rock band existing between 1974 and 1991, composed of David Byrne, Chris Frantz, Tina Weymouth and Jerry Harrison. ... Tears for Fears (abbreviated TFF) are a popular English pop band formed in the early 1980s by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, which emerged after the dissolution of their first band, the mod-influenced Graduate. ... Everybody wants to rule the world is a song by Tears for Fears from their 1984 album Songs From The Big Chair. ...

Fact vs. fiction

  • Steve Wozniak, on his personal website, has commented on the film through a series of replies to emails from fans [2]. On the issue of accuracy, Wozniak states:

The personalities and incidents are accurate in the sense that they all occurred but they are often with the wrong parties (Bill Fernandez, Apple employee #4, was with me and the computer that burned up in 1970) and at the wrong dates (when John Sculley joined, he had to redirect attention from the Apple III, not the Mac, to the Apple II) and places (Homebrew Computer Club was at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) ... the personalities were very accurately portrayed Bill Fernandez is a user interface architect who was Apple Computers first employee when they incorporated in 1977. ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was president of PepsiCo during the 1970s and early 1980s until he became CEO of Apple Computer on April 8, 1983. ... The Apple III, an early business machine predating the IBM PC The Apple III with an Apple Monitor //. The Apple III, or Apple /// as it was sometimes styled, was the first completely new computer designed by Apple. ... For other uses, see Macintosh (disambiguation) and Mac. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... The Homebrew Computer Club was an early computer hobbyist club in Silicon Valley, which met (under that name) from March 1975 to roughly 1977. ... The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a United States Department of Energy National Laboratory operated by Stanford University under the programmatic direction of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. ...

[3]

  • During an August 4, 2006 interview with Studio 360, former Director of the Xerox PARC research center, John Seely Brown, was shown the clip of Pirates of Silicon Valley in which Bill Gates tells Steve Jobs, "You and I are both like guys who had this rich neighbor—Xerox—who left the door open all the time. And you go sneakin' in to steal a TV set." After viewing the clip, Brown stated that it was not entirely accurate as Steve Jobs was invited by PARC to view their technology in exchange for Apple shares [4].
  • In an interview of director Martyn Burke located on the official T.N.T. Pirates of Silicon Valley website, Burke states that he chose not to interview either Bill Gates or Steve Jobs when making the film:

I did not want to do an "authorized biography" on either Microsoft or Apple, so we made the decision going in that we would not talk or meet with them. With a team of Harvard researchers, I embarked on a seven-month research project that encompassed virtually everything we could find on the history of both companies, including old technical magazines from the '70s. I intended every scene to be based on actual events, including such seemingly fantastic moments as Bill Gates' bulldozer races in the middle of the night and Steve Jobs' bare feet going up on the board room table during an applicant's job interview. I have two or more sources that verify each scene is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Studio 360 is a national American public weekly radio program about arts and culture hosted by Kurt Andersen and produced by Public Radio International and WNYC in New York City. ... Bold text // Headline text Link title This article is about the computer research center. ... John Seely Brown (also known as JSB) is a researcher who specializes in organizational studies with a particular bent towards the organizational implications of computer-supported activities. ... Martyn Burke (born 1947) is a journalist, screenwriter and novelist from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... TNT is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including: Trinitrotoluene, a chemical explosive. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ...

[5]

  • Because Steve Wozniak was an employee of H.P. with a contract giving the company first right of refusal on his inventions, Wozniak first offered the Apple I to H.P. In the film, Wozniak is depicted as hoping H.P. would refuse the product so he and Jobs would be able to independently develop and sell the computer. But according to his biography, iWoz, Wozniak tried quite hard to convince H.P. to take his design. H.P. still declined.
  • In the movie it is depicted that Microsoft owns a part of Apple. In reality, the shares owned by Microsoft were non-voting and later Microsoft sold these shares back to Apple after two months.

The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... Steve Wozniak or Woz co-founded Apple Computer and designed the Apple II, contributing greatly to the personal computer revolution. ... Dr. Adele Goldberg is a computer scientist who wrote or co-wrote books on the programming language Smalltalk-80. ... PARC current logo. ... A contemporary computer mouse, with the most common standard features — two buttons and a scroll-wheel. ... Dr. Douglas C. Engelbart (born January 30, 1925 in Oregon) is an American inventor of German descent. ...

Trivia

  • Noah Wyle made an appearance during the beginning of Jobs' Macworld Expo Keynote Presentation in 2000, initially pretending to be Jobs. When the audience caught on, Jobs himself appeared and began to banter with Wyle [6].
  • "Pirates of Silicon Valley" was nominated for five Emmys. In order to qualify it for Emmy consideration, it was first shown on television at 3am some time before its official prime-time premiere.

Produced by Boston-based IDG World Expo, Macworld Conference & Expo is a trade show dedicated to the Apple Macintosh platform with conference tracks occurring twice a year in the United States. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Big Brother as portrayed in the 1954 BBC Television adaptation of Nineteen Eighty-Four. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, County Durham) is an influential Academy Award-nominated English film director, and producer. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... Thelma & Louise is a road movie from 1991 conceived and written by Callie Khouri, co-produced and directed by Ridley Scott, and starring Geena Davis as Thelma, Susan Sarandon as Louise, and Harvey Keitel as a sympathetic detective trying to solve crimes that the two women find easier and easier... Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir American film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ... Black Hawk Down is a 2001 film by Ridley Scott, based on the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden. ... An Emmy Award. ...

See also

  • History of computing hardware (1960s-present)
  • Homebrew Computer Club
  • Daniel Kottke

For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... The history of computing hardware starting in the 1960s begins with the development of the integrated circuit (IC), which formed the basis of the first computer kits and home computers in the 1970s, notable examples being the MITS Altair, Apple II and Commodore PET; and which eventually powered personal and... The Homebrew Computer Club was an early computer hobbyist club in Silicon Valley, which met (under that name) from March 1975 to roughly 1977. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires is a documentary film written and hosted by Robert X. Cringely. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is a U.S. computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Notes

External links

  • Official website-- Fire in the Valley
  • In Search of the Valley Documentary on Silicon Valley featuring many of those in "Pirates of Silicon Valley"
  • Pirates of Silicon Valley on Google Video

  Results from FactBites:
 
Muddy Waters (review of "Pirates of Silicon Valley") | Linux Journal (499 words)
"Pirates of Silicon Valley", which talks about the rise of young Bill Gates of Microsoft and Stephen Jobs of Apple, reminded me of movies in the exposé genre, movies which seem to say, "look how outrageous these famous people are!" Flashy, sensational portrayals are the norm here, making the celebrities shown seem completely unbalanced.
The story itself was based on the book Fire in the Valley: The Making of the Personal Computer by Paul Freiberger and Michael Swain, which consisted of interviews with "the people who made PCs a reality".
For the most part, the movie was a retelling or narration of the rise and rise of Silicon Valley's most famous sons, Gates and Jobs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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