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Encyclopedia > Piraeus
This article refers to the Greek city. Piraeus is also a figure in Greek mythology, appearing in The Odyssey.

Coordinates: 37°57′N, 23°38′E Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Piraeus. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Piraeus  (Πειραιάς)
View of Piraeus Harbour
Location
Coordinates 37°57′N, 23°38′E
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (min-max): 2 - 6.6 m  (7 -  22 ft)
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: Attica
Prefecture: Piraeus Prefecture
Mayor: Panagiotis Fasoulas  (PASOK)
(2007)
Population statistics (as of 2001)
Municipality
 - Population: 175,697
 - Area: 10.865 km² (4 sq.mi.)
 - Density: 16,171 /km² (41,882 /sq.mi.)
Metropolitan
 - Population: 466,065
 - Area: 50.417 km² (19 sq.mi.)
 - Density: 9,244 /km² (23,942 /sq.mi.)
Codes
Postal codes: 185 xx
Area codes: 210
Website
www.pireasnet.gr

Piraeus (Modern Greek: Πειραιάς Pireás, Ancient Greek / Katharevousa: Πειραιεύς Peiraieus) is a city in the periphery of Attica, Greece, located to the south of the city of Athens. It is the capital of the Piraeus Prefecture and belongs to the Athens urban area. It was the port of the ancient city of Athens and it was chosen to serve as the modern port when Athens was re-founded in 1834. Piraeus remains one of the busiest shipping and industrial centres of the Mediterranean and is the terminus for Line 1 (the "green line"), the electric train service now incorporated into the Athens Metro. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 788 KB) Piraeus yacht harbor, Greece File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Piraeus Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 685 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 700 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Adapted from Image:Greece outline map. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... This is an alphabetical list of countries of the world, including independent states (both those that are internationally recognised and generally unrecognised), inhabited dependent territories and areas of special sovereignty. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Piraeus is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Panagiotis Fasoulas (Greek: Παναγιώτης Φασούλας; born May 12, 1963 in Thessaloniki, Greece) Nicknamed the spider (Greek:αράχνη) is a former Greek professional basketball player. ... Party logo The Panhellenic Socialist Movement, better known as PASOK (Greek: Πανελλήνιο Σοσιαλιστικό Κίνημα, Panellinio Sosialistiko Kinima, ΠΑΣΟΚ), is a Greek social democratic political party. ... This is an alphabetical list of municipalities and communities in Greece. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Metropolitan area in Western Tokyo as seen from Tokyo Tower A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Here are list of postal codes in Greece. ... This is an alphabetical list by town of dialing codes in Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Greek ( IPA: or IPA: — Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in that language family. ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... Katharevousa (Greek Καθαρεύουσα, IPA: ) is a form of the Greek language, created during the early 19th century by Adamantios Korais (1748-1833). ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... Piraeus is one of the prefectures of Greece. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... View of part of central Athens and some of the citys southern suburbs from Lykavittos Hill. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Exhibition of archaeological finds that came to light during the construction of the project displayed at Metro station Syntagma, Athens. ...


The population of the dimos (municipality) of Piraeus (Δήμος Πειραιώς) is 175,697 (2001). The nomarchia of Piraeus, which includes the surrounding land and some of the islands of the Saronic Gulf, has a population of 541,504 (2001). It consists of a rocky promontory, containing three natural harbours, a large one on the north-west which is an important commercial harbour for the eastern Mediterranean Sea, and two smaller ones, Zea and Mikrolimano, used for naval purposes. The port serves ferry routes to almost every island in the eastern portion of Greece, the island of Crete, the Cyclades, the Dodecanese, and much of the northern and the eastern Aegean. The western part of the port is used for cargo services and covers a huge area. Much of that part of the harbour is in suburban Drapetsona and Keratsini. The Saronic Gulf or Gulf of Aegina in Greece forms part of the Aegean Sea and defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ... The Dodecanese (Greek: Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, meaning twelve islands; see also List of traditional Greek place names) are a group of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Drapetsona (Greek, Δραπετσώνα), older form Drapetsonas is a suburb in the southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ... Keratsini (Greek, Modern: Κερατσίνι, Ancient/Katharevousa -on), older forms Keratsinio and Keratsinion is a suburb in the west southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ...

Contents

History

Ancient times

Piraeus has been inhabited since about 2,600 BC.[1] The name Piraeus roughly means "the place over the passage". In very early antiquity Piraeus was a rocky island (the settlement of Munychia-the present Kastella) connected to the mainland by a low-lying stretch of land that was flooded with sea water most of the year and was used as a salt field whenever it dried up. Consequently it was called the "Halipedon" (salt field) and its muddy soil made it a tricky passage. The area was increasingly silted and flooding ceased, and by early classical times the land passage was made safe. It was then that Piraeus assumed its importance as a deep water harbor, and the older, shallow Phaleron harbor fell into gradual disuse. Munichia is the ancient Greek name for a steep hill (86 m. ... Faliro or Faliron/Phaliron (Greek: Φάληρο Pháliro, Latin: Phaleron, Phalerum) is a community 8 km SW of downtown Athens. ...


Themistocles was the first to urge the Athenians to take advantage of these harbours, instead of using the sandy bay of Phaleron. Foreseeing a new attack by the Persians -after the Battle of Marathon- he built large fortification works and turned Piraeus into a military harbor in 493 BC. The shipyards that were created then, built the mighty Athenian fleet, which distinguished itself at the Battle of Salamis. This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Faliro or Faliron/Phaliron (Greek: Φάληρο Pháliro, Latin: Phaleron, Phalerum) is a community 8 km SW of downtown Athens. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... Combatants Athens, Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus â€ , Arimnestus Datis â€ ?, Artaphernes Strength 10,000 Athenians, 1,000 Plataeans 20,000 - 60,000 a Casualties 192 Athenians killed, 11 Plataeans killed (Herodotus) 6,400 killed, 7 ships captured (Herodotus) a These are modern estimates. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 498 BC 497 BC 496 BC 495 BC 494 BC - 493 BC - 492 BC 491 BC... Combatants Greek city-states Persia, Halicarnassus Commanders Eurybiades of Sparta Themistocles of Athens Adeimantus of Corinth Aristides of Athens Xerxes I of Persia, Ariamenes †, Artemisia Strength 366-380 ships a 1,000-1,207 ships [1]b Casualties 40 ships 500 ships a Herodotus gives 378 of the alliance, but...


In 460 BC the fortifications were completed by Kimon and Pericles when Piraeus was connected with Athens by the Long Walls. The original town of Piraeus was planned by the architect Hippodamus of Miletus in the famous grid system that he devised, probably in the time of Pericles. The main agora was named after him, as an honor. Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC - 460 BC - 459 BC 458 BC... Kimon (Greek Κίμων, also spelled Cimon in traditional Classical scholarship contexts) (510, Athens-450 BCE, Salamis), was an Athenian statesman and general, and a major political figure of the 470s BC and 460s BC in the ancient city-state (polis) of Athens. ... Pericles or Perikles (c. ... The Long Walls generally refers to the walls connecting Athens to its port at Piraeus which were constructed in the mid 5th century BC, destroyed by the Spartans in 404 BC after Athens defeat in the Peloponnesian War, and rebuilt again with Persian support during the Corinthian War. ... Hippodamus of Miletus (sometimes also called Hippodamos), was a Greek architect of the 5th century BC. It was he who introduced order and regularity into the planning of cities, in place of the previous intricacy and confusion. ... A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... Pericles or Perikles (c. ... Stoa of the ancient agora de Thessaloniki An agora (αγορά), translatable as marketplace, was a public space and an essential part of an ancient Greek polis or city-state. ...


During the Peloponnesian Wars, Piraeus was the major Athenian port. In 404 BC, Munychia was seized by Thrasybulus and the exiles from Phyle, and in the Battle of Munychia, the Phyleans defeated the Thirty Tyrants in Athens. The three chief arsenals of Piraeus were Munychia, Zea and Cantharus, which could contain 82, 196 and 94 ships respectively in the 4th century BC. Piraeus, as a port, would follow the fate of Athens. After the end of the Peloponnesian Wars, when Athens came under Spartan occupation, Piraeus was to bear the brunt of the victors' rage. These walls would be torn down, the triremes found in the harbor surrendered to the Spartans or were burned, while the renowned neosoikoi ("ships' houses") would be pulled down and indeed in an almost festive manner-with music, dancing and songs. For the earlier war beginning in 460 BC, see First Peloponnesian War. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 409 BC 408 BC 407 BC 406 BC 405 BC - 404 BC - 403 BC 402 BC... Thrasybulus (Ancient Greek: , brave-willed, Eng. ... There are things that have the name Phyle: A soliological analog of a biological phyla, mentioned in a novel The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson which includes three great tribes. ... Combatants Athenian exiles Oligarchic government of Athens Commanders Thrasybulus Critias† Strength 1,000 Several thousand Casualties Light 70 killed The Battle of Munychia was fought between Athenians exiled by the oligarchic government of the Thirty Tyrants and the forces of that government, supported by a Spartan garrison. ... The Thirty Tyrants were a pro-Spartan oligarchy installed in Athens after Athens defeat in the Peloponnesian War in April 404 BC. Its two leading members were Tharamenes and Critias, a former acolyte of Socrates. ... The 4th century BC started the first day of 400 BC and ended the last day of 301 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: Spártē) is a city in southern Greece. ... A Greek trireme. ...


After the reinstatement of democracy, Konon rebuilt the walls in 393 BC, funded the temples of Aphrodite Euploia, the sanctuary of Zeus Sotiros and Athena, and built the famous Skevothiki of Philon, the ruins of which have been discovered at Zea. This revival of the town was quashed by the Roman Sulla who captured Piraeus in 86 BC. The destruction was completed in 395 AD by the Goths under Alaric. During the Byzantine period the harbor of Piraeus was used at various intervals, but it was very far from the capital, Constantinople. Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC - 390s BC - 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC 398 BC 397 BC 396 BC 395 BC 394 BC - 393 BC - 392 BC 391 BC 390... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L·CORNELIVS·L·F·P·N·SVLLA·FELIX) ¹ (ca. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 91 BC 90 BC 89 BC 88 BC 87 BC - 86 BC - 85 BC 84 BC 83... Events After the death of emperor Theodosius I, the Roman Empire is divided in an eastern and a western half. ... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... An 1894 photogravure of Alaric I taken from a painting by Ludwig Thiersch. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Map of Constantinople. ...


Ottoman times

In 1456, it became known as the "Aslan Liman" of the Turks (the Lion's Port), getting its name from the marble lion standing at the point where, later, the old Town Hall was built.[1] The marble lion was removed and stolen in 1688, during Francesco Morozini's well-known expedition against Athens, and carried to the Arsenal of Venice where it still stands today (see Piraeus Lion). A copy of the lion statue is on display at the Piraeus Archaeological Musuem. // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... The Porta Magna at the Venetian Arsenal The Venetian Arsenal (Italian: Arsenale di Venezia) is a shipyard and naval depot that played a leading role in Venetian empire-building. ... Ancient Greek lion statue at the Arsenal, Venice The Piraeus Lion is one of four lion statues on display at the Venetian Arsenal, where it was displayed as a symbol of Venices patron saint, Saint Mark. ...


Throughout the Turkish occupation, Piraeus was mostly deserted except for a small place of habitation was around the St. Spyridonas Monastery. During that time there was only a customs house and the monastery of St. Spyridonas. Saint Spyridon (Greek c. ...


Modern Greek state

With the creation of the modern Greek state and the proclamation of Athens as the capital in 1832, the port again acquired a reason for existence and growth and developed into a great commercial and industrial center. People started to come back to the city once again. A town plan for Piraeus was also drawn up and approved by King Othon.[1] Following the establishment of the town, municipal elections were held to elect a new mayor for the city. Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


It quickly became the leading port and second largest city in Greece. Helping the city grow was its prime geographical location and closeness to the Greek capital.


The town flourished and lovely buildings were constructed. One of them, which continues to ornament the present town, is the Municipal Theater, an excellent example of neoclassical architecture. Today, Piraeus is the third largest city in Greece and the largest port in the country.

Attiko Metro Station in Piraeus.

Large parts of the Themistoclean Walls around the shoreline survive in very good condition to this day, and are incorporated in seaside promenades. Remnants of the neosoikoi, where the triremes were kept in wintertime, were also excavated and valuable information about ancient shipbuilding and sailing was obtained by their study. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1578x1028, 611 KB) Description: Athens Metro, station Piraeus by Lucretious [1] from http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1578x1028, 611 KB) Description: Athens Metro, station Piraeus by Lucretious [1] from http://www. ...


Greek shipping

In addition to being the largest marine-based shipping centre of Greece, Piraeus is also the commercial hub of Greek shipping, with most of Greece's shipowners basing their commercial operations there, largely centered around the street Akti Miaouli. Marine is an umbrella term for things relating to the ocean, as with marine biology, marine geology, and as a term for a navy, etc. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ...


In its capacities as host to Greek shipping, Piraeus has been affected largely by the various Governments of Greece. For example, after World War II, the Greek government attempted to nationalize the proceeds of the insurance payments given to Greek shipowners who had lost vessels as a result of those vessels having been commandeered by the Allied Forces. The insurance had been provided by Lloyd's of London and guaranteed by the coalition of the allied forces. Although the Greek shipowners ultimately won their case against the Greek government in the British courts, most were uninterested in continuing to base their headquarters in Piraeus both out of distrust of the Greek government and the fact that the war had left the greater Athens area in a state of severe poverty. As a result, the Greek shipowners left Piraeus en masse in favor of operations in London, New York, Alexandria and other major shipping cities. In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... NY redirects here. ... Alexandria (Greek: , Coptic: , Arabic: , Egyptian Arabic: Iskindireyya), (population of 3. ...


1967 junta

In 1967, when a group of colonels staged a coup d'etat against the government, in order to increase desperately needed revenues, the junta offered lavish incentives for the Greek shipowners to bring their companies back to Piraeus. This including both tax incentives, as well as other incentives as evident by the fact that Aristotle Onasis was allowed to purchase the entire island of Skorpios, which otherwise would have been a violation of Greek coastline laws. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... The Phoenix rising from its flames and the silhouette of the soldier bearing a rifle with fixed bayonet was the emblem of the Junta. ... Aristotle Onassis Aristotle Onassis (Αριστοτέλης Ωνάσης) (January 15, 1906–March 15, 1975) was the most famous Greek shipping magnate of the 20th century. ... Skorpios is an island in the Ionian Sea off the western coast of Greece. ...

A night ferry about to leave the port of Piraeus for the Dodecanese.
A night ferry about to leave the port of Piraeus for the Dodecanese.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, ca. ... The Dodecanese (Greek: Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, meaning twelve islands; see also List of traditional Greek place names) are a group of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ...

1974 democratic government

After the junta fell in 1974, the successive democratic government generally maintained the deregulation of Greek-based shipping, and many shipowners have maintained commercial operations there since. Today, however, as a result of traffic congestion plaguing the Athens area, and the fact that most shipowners reside in the lavish Northern suburbs of Athens, many shipowners have opted to move their bases once again away from Piraeus to Northern Athens. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Greek shipping today

Nevertheless, Piraeus is still a major center for Greek and international shipping, and bi-annually, there is a major shipping convention in Piraeus, called Posidonia, which attracts maritime industry professionals from all over the world.

View of Piraeus in the lower left hand corner of the Attica Basin.
View of Piraeus in the lower left hand corner of the Attica Basin.

Download high resolution version (1362x852, 318 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1362x852, 318 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Population figures

Year Municipal population Change Density
1981 196,389 - 17,853.55/km²
1991 182,671 -14,168/-7.25% 16,606.45/km²
2001 175,697 -6,974/-3.82% 15,972.45/km²

Piraeus is one of the various municipal authorities of the Athens metropolitan area, located at the south-western part of it. Six other municipal authorities comprise what is the urban district of Piraeus (areas that in the past were part of the municipal area of Piraeus but now are self-governed at the local level): Nikaia, Korydallos, Keratsini, Perama, Drapetsona and Rentis. The total population of the seven municipal regions is 466,065 (2001), a part of the total population of the Athens conurbation - that is 3,130,841 (2001). 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nikaia or Nikea (Greek: Νίκαια) is a suburb in the west southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ... Coordinates 37°48′ N 23°39′ E Country Greece Periphery Attica Prefecture Piraeus Population 67,456 source (2001) Area 4. ... Keratsini (Greek, Modern: Κερατσίνι, Ancient/Katharevousa -on), older forms Keratsinio and Keratsinion is a suburb in the west southwestern part of Athens, Greece. ... There are communities that have the name Perama: Perama (Greek: Πέραμα) is a port city and a suburb of Athens that lies on the southwest edge of the Aegaleo mountains. ... Agios Ioannis Rentis, Agios Ioannis Rendis, Agios Ioannis Redis, Ayios Ioannis Rentis, Ayios Ioannis Rendis, Ayios Ioannis Redis, (Greek: Άγιος Ιωάννης Ρέντης, first part meaning Saint John), older forms Aghios Ioannis Rentis, Aghios Ioannis Rendis...


Sister cities

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Ostrava, Czech republic Flag of Czech Republic Nickname: Steel Heart of the Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Moravian-Silesian District Ostrava Founded 1267  - Mayor Petr Kajnar (ÄŒSSD) Area    - City 214 km²  (82. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic_(bordered). ...


Baltimore, Maryland, USA Flag of United States Nickname: Motto: The Greatest City in America,[4] Get in on it. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Galati, Romania Flag of Romania since 1985 Galaţi is a city in eastern Romania, on the banks of the Danube, very close to Braila. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ...


Famous residents

Main article: List of persons from Piraeus
  • Alexandros Pallis (1851 - 1935 in Liverpool)
  • The Andrianopoulos brothers, founders of the Olympiacos sporting club
  • Yiorgos Batis (1885 in Methana - March 10, 1967), a Greek musician
  • Katina Paxinou (December 17, 1900February 22, 1973 in Athens)
  • Dimitris Gkogkos (1903 - 1985), a Greek musician
  • Christos Levantas (1904 - 1974)
  • Markos Vamvakaris (1905 - February 8, 1972), a Greek musician
  • Dimitris Papamichael (1931 - August 8, 2004)
  • Yiannis Kyrastas (1952 - April 1, 2004)
  • Pantelis Thalassinos (June 11, 1958)
  • Theadora Cardaras (May, 1927)
  • Alexandros Christoufis
  • Eva Dimonta, writer
  • Alexandra Drosiadou, writer
  • Dimitrios Gavriilidis, writer
  • Antonis Kanas, writer
  • Giannis Kasavelis, writer
  • Dimitris Kokoris, writer
  • Varvara Konstantinopoulou, writer
  • Anna Kontogiorgi, writer
  • Spyros Koukoulomatis, writer
  • Georgios Kountouris, writer
  • Dionyssis Kouris, writer
  • Ioannis Koutsis, writer
  • Andreas Krystallis, writer
  • Stamatis Lazarou, writer
  • Giannis Lekkos, writer
  • Theodoros Errikos Lekkos, writer
  • Polychronis Lembesis, writer
  • Vassilis Lembesopoulos, writer
  • Nikos Lembesopoulos, writer
  • Michalis Lembesopoulos, writer
  • Epameinondas Liokis, writer
  • Nikolaos Liokis, writer
  • Kostas Margelis, writer
  • Giorgos Mendrinos, writer
  • Stylianos Miliadis, writer
  • Kostas Mitsos, writer
  • Filda Niamonitaki, writer
  • Michalis Nikolakos, writer
  • Michalis Oikonomou, writer
  • Spyros Paliouras, writer
  • Nikos Panagiotatos, writer
  • Kostas Papadopoulos, writer
  • Matthaios Papatheodorou, writer
  • Nikolaos Pavlopoulos, writer
  • Giannis Tsarouchis, writer
  • Chara Vienna, writer
  • Gerasimos Vokos, writer

1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Liverpool skyline. ... Yiorgos Batis (Greek: Γιώργος Μπάτης, also Giorgos Batis) (1885 in Methana - March 10, 1967) was one of the first and infulential in rebetiko music and was known in Piraeus. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (70th in leap years). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Katina Paxinou (17 December 1900 - 22 February 1973) was an Academy Award-winning Greek film and theatre actress. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Dimitris Papamichael (b. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... August 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8... Ioannis Kyrastas (Greek: ) (25 October 1952 - 1 April 2004) was a Greek footballer and football manager. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar). ... Nikolaos Pavlopoulos (Greek: Νικόλαος Παυλόπουλος, Agios Georgios Nileias, 1909 - Athens, October 10, 1990) was a Greek sculptor and writer. ...

Mayors of Piraeus

  • Hydraian Kyriakos Serfiotis (1835-1841)[1]
  • Petros Skylitsis-Homiridis (1841-1845) and (1848-1854)
  • Antonios Theoharis (1845-1848)
  • Loukas Rallis (1855-1866)
  • Demetrios Moutzopoulos (1866-1874)
  • Tryfon Moutzopoulos (1874-1883) and (1895-1903)
  • Aristides Skylitsis (1883-1887)
  • Theadoros Retsinas (1887-1895)
  • George Andrianopoulos (1987-1990)
  • Stelios Logothetis (1991-1998)
  • Christos Agrapidis (1999-2006)
  • Panagiotis Fasoulas (2007- )

Panagiotis Fasoulas (Greek: Παναγιώτης Φασούλας; born May 12, 1963 in Thessaloniki, Greece) Nicknamed the spider (Greek:αράχνη) is a former Greek professional basketball player. ...

Universities and technological institutes

Front entrance of campus The University of Piraeus (Greek: Πανεπιστήμιο Πειραιώς) was founded in 1938 under the title of the “School for Industrial Studies”, by the Industrialists and Tradesmen Association. ...

Professional sports

Ethnikos Piraeus - team crest The second great team of Piraeus, as they were once known, may have fallen into hard times recently but they boast of a great history. ... Olympiacos CFP (Greek: Ολυμπιακός Σύνδεσμος Φιλάθλων Πειραιώς - Olympiakos Syndesmos Filathlon Peiraios) is a large and the most popular Greek multisport club, based in Piraeus, Athens. ... The Karaiskaki Stadium is located near Piraeus in the Faliro area of Athens, Greece. ... Club Name Olympiacos Piraeus Basketball Club Image Founded 1925 Nickname Thrylos, Red-Whites Arena Peace and Friendship Stadium, Faliro, Piraeus, Greece. ... Categories: Stub | Athens Olympic venues ...

See also

Here are communities that also includes independent municipalities of the prefecture of Attica: A-B Acharnae Aegina Afidnes Agia Marina, S of Athens Agia Marina near Schinia Agia Paraskevi Agia Sotiria Agia Triada Agia Triada Parnithos Agia Varvara Agioi Apostoloi Agios Andreas Agios Dimitrios, S of Athens Agios Dimitrios between...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  1. ^ a b c d The Port of Piraeus Through the Ages

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Piraeus
Look up Piraeus in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
North: Nikaia ,Korydallos and Agia Varvara
West: Drapetsona, Keratsini,Perama Piraeus East: Agios Ioannis Rentis and Moschato
South: Piraeus Harbor, Saronic Gulf, Phaleron Bay SE
Municipalities and communities of the Piraeus Prefecture
AeginaAgios Ioannis RentisAmpelakiaDrapetsonaHydraKeratsiniKorydallosKythiraMethanaNikaiaPeramaPiraeusPorosSalamisSpetsesTroizina
AgkistriAntikythera

  Results from FactBites:
 
Piraeus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1070 words)
It is the capital of the Piraeus Prefecture.
Piraeus remains a major shipping and industrial centre, and is the terminus for Line 1 (the "green line"), the electric train service now incorporated into the Athens Metro.
The population of the demos (municipality) of Piraeus (Δήμος Πειραιώς) is 175,697 (2001).
Harbours full text (4516 words)
Piraeus is situated in the northern part of the west coastline of Attica peninsula, surrounded by the Saronic gulf.
Inhabitance of Piraeus was mainly initiated in 479B.C. with the instigation of the Athenian Deme by Themistocles to fortify and develop the most significant port of Athens.
Remnants of the fortification of the harbour and the city are preserved on the peninsula of Piraeus, on the whole length of the Eetioneian coast, northeast of the city as well as behind the area of today’s Kastella.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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