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Encyclopedia > Pippinids
Carolingian dynasty
Pippinids
Arnulfings
Carolingians
After the Treaty of Verdun (843)

The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as Mayor of the Palace, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustria and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians. The last of the Pippinids was Charlemagne's father Pippin III (Pepin III) (also known as Pippin the Short), 714-768, who became Mayor of the Palace in 741 upon the death of his father Charles Martel and was subsequently elected king in his own right in 751. After the rule of his son Charlemagne, the house became known as the Carolingians. Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Pippin of Landen, also known as Pippin the Elder (580 - 640), was the Frankish Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia under the Merovingian kings Clotaire II, Dagobert I and Sigebert III from 615 or 623 to 629. ... Grimoald the Elder or Grimaud (d. ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as major-domos, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustria and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Arnulf of Metz (August 13, 582 – August 16, 640) was a Frankish noble who had great influence in the Merovingian kingdoms as a bishop and was later canonized as a saint. ... Chlodulf was bishop of Metz approximately from 657 to 697. ... Ansegisel, or Duke Angiese, was the son of Arnulf of Metz and his wife Doda. ... Pippin of Herstal (or Pepin; Pépin), also known as Pippin the Middle, Pippin the Younger (as with his grandson), or Pippin II, (635 or 640–December 16, 714, Jupille) was the grandson of Pippin (I) the Elder through the marriage of Ansegisel and Begga, the daughter of the Elder. ... Grimoald II (d. ... Drogo (670-708), son of Pepin the Middle and Plectrude, was the duke of Champagne by appointment of his father in 690 and duke of Burgundy from the death of Nordebert in 697. ... Theudoald or Theodald was the mayor of the palace, briefly unopposed in 714 until Ragenfrid was acclaimed in Neustria and Charles Martel in Austrasia by the nobles, after the death of his grandfather, Pepin of Heristal. ... The Carolingians were a dynasty of rulers that eventually controlled the Frankish realm and its successors from the 8th to the 10th century, officially taking over the kingdom from the Merovingian dynasty in 751. ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Carloman (716–754) was the son of Charles Martel, major domo or Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia and Chrotrud. ... Pippin the Younger Pippin the Younger or Pepin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short or the ordinal Pippin III, was the king of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ... Carloman (751 - December 4, 771) was a King of the Franks (768 - 771). ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Divisions of the Treaty of Verdun. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... Middle Francia describes the realm created for Emperor Lothair I, wedged between East Francia and West Francia. ... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ... The Frankish Empire after the treaties of Verdun and Meerssen. ... Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804 – August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire... East Francia was the land of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843, which divided the Carolingian Empire of the Franks. ... Mayor of the Palace was an early medieval title and office, also known by the Latin name, maior domus or majordomo, used most notably in the Frankish kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries. ... Neustria & Austrasia The territory of Neustria originated in A.D. 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. ... Austrasia & Neustria Austrasia formed the north-eastern portion of the Kingdom of the Merovingian Franks, comprising parts of the territory of present-day eastern France, western Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. ... For other uses of the term Merovingian, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ...


External link

  • BBC2: "From Merovingians to Carolingians : Dynastic Change in Frankia"

  Results from FactBites:
 
PIPPINID Articles The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the (440 words)
The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as Mayor of the Palace, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustria and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians.
The dynasty is usually considered to have been founded by Saint Arnulf, bishop of Metz in the early seventh century, who wielded a great deal of power and influence in the Merovingian kingdoms.
The mayoralty of the palace of the kingdom of Austrasia began in the family with Ansegisel and continued with Pepin of Heristal.
Pippinid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (135 words)
The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as major-domos, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustria and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians.
The last of the Pippinids was Charlemagne's father Pippin III (Pepin III) (also known as Pippin the Short), 714-768, who became major-domo in 741 upon the death of his father Charles Martel and was subsequently elected king in his own right in 751.
After the rule of his son Charlemagne, the house became known as the Carolingians.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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