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Encyclopedia > Pippin (musical)
Pippin
Original Cast Recording
Music Stephen Schwartz
Lyrics Stephen Schwartz
Book Roger O. Hirson
Based upon Fictitious life of Pippin the Hunchback, son of Charlemagne
Productions 1972 Broadway
1973 West End
1981 U.S. Television

Pippin is a stage musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz and a book by Roger O. Hirson. Bob Fosse, who directed the original Broadway production, also contributed to the libretto. The show was based on the life of Pippin the Hunchback, the son of Charlemagne. The show was partially financed by Motown Records. As of October 2007, Pippin is the 27th longest-running Broadway musical in musical theatre history. [1] Image File history File links Pippinalbum. ... Stephen Lawrence Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is a well-known American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Stephen Lawrence Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is a well-known American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Charlemagne und Pippin the Hunchback. ... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Stephen Lawrence Schwartz (born March 6, 1948) is a well-known American musical theater lyricist and composer. ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image Bob Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was a musical theater choreographer and director. ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... Charlemagne und Pippin the Hunchback. ... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City, hence mo(tor)town), from where it achieved widespread international success. ...


Pippin was originally conceived by Stephen Schwartz as Pippen, Pippen, a student musical performed by Carnegie Mellon's Scotch'n'Soda theatre troupe.[2] Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... ScotchnSoda is a student run theatre organization that resides on the campus of Carnegie Mellon University. ...

Contents

Synopsis

The play begins with a leading player of a troupe and the actors in various costume pieces of several different time periods. The Leading Player invites the audience to join them in a story about a boy prince searching for fulfillment ("Magic to Do"). They reveal that the boy who is to play the title character is a new actor. Pippin tells the scholars of the time about his dreams ("Corner of the Sky"), and they happily applaud Pippin on his ambitious quest for an extraordinary life. Pippin then returns home to the castle and estate of Charlemagne (King Charles), his father. Charles and Pippin don't get a chance to communicate often, as they are interrupted by nobles, soldiers, and couriers vying for Charles' attention ("Welcome Home"), and Charles is clearly uncomfortable speaking with his educated son or expressing any loving emotions. Pippin also meets up with his stepmother Fastrada, and her dim-witted son Lewis. Charles and Lewis are planning on going into battle against the Visigoths soon, and Pippin begs Charles to take him along so as to prove himself. Charles reluctantly agrees and proceeds to explain a battle plan to his men ("War is a Science"). A troupe is a theatre company of touring actors, singers and/or dancers. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... For other uses, see Audience (disambiguation). ... Look up Fulfillment in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline. ... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... This article discusses delivery couriers; for the font see Courier (font). ... Fastrada (died 794) fourth wife of Charlemagne, married 784. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ...


Once in battle, the Leading Player re-enters to lead the troupe in a mock battle using top hats, canes, and fancy jazz as to glorify warfare and violence ("Glory"). This charade of war does not appeal to Pippin, and the boy flees into the countryside. The Leading Player tells the audience of Pippin's travel through the country, until he stops at his exiled grandmother's estate ("Simple Joys"). There, Berthe (his grandmother, and Charles' mother, exiled by Fastrada) tells Pippin not to be so serious and to live a little ("No Time At All"). Pippin takes this advice and decides to search for something a bit more lighthearted. He chooses "the flesh," sex ("With You"). After an overwhelming orgy of sexual activity, Pippin realizes the true nature of sex as an all-consuming entity, and begs the Leading Player to halt the troupe in their erotic dances. Duke Ellington wearing a top hat. ... A cane is a long stick, generally of bamboo, malacca (rattan), or some similar plant, used as a walking stick; as a support for growing plants; for marking out a piece of ground; or as a material for consturcting furniture or buildings. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... -1... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... Charade is a 1963 film written by Peter Stone and Marc Behm, directed by Stanley Donen, and starring Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn. ... Exile (band) may refer to: Exile - The American country music band Exile - The Japanese pop music band Category: ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about ancient Greek gathering. ...


The Leading Player then tells Pippin that perhaps he should fight tyranny, and uses Charles as a perfect example of an unenlightened tyrant to fight. Pippin plans a revolution, and Fastrada is delighted to hear that perhaps Charles and Pippin will both perish so that her beloved Lewis can become king. Fastrada arranges the murder of Charles, and Pippin falls victim to her plot ("Spread a Little Sunshine"). While Charles is praying at Arles, Pippin murders him, and becomes the new king ("Morning Glow"). However, after petitions from the masses, Pippin realizes that neither he nor his father could change society and had to act as tyrants. He begs the Leading Player to bring his slain father back to life, and the Leading Player does so. This page is about the religious concept of Tyranny. ... -1... Prayer is an effort to communicate with God, or to some deity or deities, or another form of spiritual entity, or otherwise, either to offer praise, to make a request, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions. ... Look up Petition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Pippin is left without direction until the Leading Player inspires him ("On the Right Track"). After experimenting with art and religion, he travels and stumbles upon an estate owned by Catherine ("Kind of Woman"), a widow, with a small boy, Theo. From the start, it is clear that the Leading Player is concerned with Catherine's actual attraction to Pippin—after all, she is but a player playing a part in his yet-to-be-unfolded plan. At first, Pippin thinks himself above such boring manorial duties as sweeping, repairs, and milking cows ("Extraordinary"), but eventually he comforts Theo on the sickness and eventual death of his pet ("Prayer for a Duck") and warms up to the lovely Catherine ("Love Song"). However, as time goes by, Pippin feels that he must leave the estate to continue searching for his purpose. Catherine is heartbroken, and reflects on him (much to the Leading Player's anger and surprise) ("I Guess I'll Miss the Man").


All alone on a stage, Pippin is surrounded by the Leading Player and the various troupe members. They all suggest that Pippin complete the most perfect act ever: the Finale. They tell Pippin to jump into a box of fire, light himself up, and "become one with the flame." Pippin is reluctant, but agrees that perhaps suicide is the best way to go ("Finale"), but he is stopped by his natural misgivings and also by one actress from the troupe—the woman playing Catherine. Catherine and her son Theo stand by Pippin and defy the script, the Leading Player, and Fastrada. Pippin comes to the realization that the widow's home was the only place where he was truly happy ("Magic Shows and Miracles") "....I never came close my love". After removing the sets, lighting, makeup, and costumes from the stage (to no success at dissuading Pippin), The Leading Player becomes furious and calls off the show, telling the rest of the troupe and the orchestra to pack up and leave Pippin, Catherine, and her son alone on an empty, dark and silent stage. Pippin realizes that he has given up his extraordinary purpose for the simplest and most ordinary life of all, and he is finally a happy man. For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


Alternate Ending

The currently licensed edition of Pippin has a slightly different ending. After Pippin avers his contentment with a simple life with Catherine, Theo remains on stage and sings the chorus of "Corner of the Sky", after which the Leading Player and the troupe return to begin work on this new prospect. Current productions vary between the two possible endings.


Songs

While the show is technically one act, an intermission is usually given. While at the discretion of the individual director, a common break is made just after "Morning Glow".

  • Magic to Do*
  • Corner of the Sky†
  • Welcome Home
  • War Is a Science
  • Glory
  • Simple Joys
  • No Time at All‡
  • With You
  • Spread a Little Sunshine
  • Morning Glow**
  • On the Right Track
  • Kind of Woman
  • Extraordinary
  • Prayer for a Duck
  • Love Song
  • I Guess I'll Miss the Man††
  • Finale/Magic Shows and Miracles

* Introduced by Ben Vereen in the Broadway production and performed by Northern J. Calloway in London. Ben Vereen (born October 10, 1946) is an American actor. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Northern J. Calloway (January 22, 1948–January 9, 1990) was an American actor who played David on Sesame Street from 1971 through 1989, and also voiced Muppet characters including Same Sound Brown. ...


†Introduced by John Rubinstein in the title role on Broadway and performed by Paul Jones in the London production. The song was covered by the The Jackson 5 in 1972, and is included as a bonus track on the 2000 CD release of the Original Broadway Cast Recording. A duet by Dusty Springfield and Petula Clark, whose vocals were recorded more than thirty years apart, is included on Clark's 2007 CD Duets. John Rubinstein (born 8 December 1946) is an American film and television actor. ... Paul Jones (born Paul Pond, 24 February 1942, in Portsmouth, England) is an English singer, actor, harmonica player, and radio and television presenter. ... The Jackson 5 (also spelled The Jackson Five or The Jackson 5ive, abbreviated as J5, and later known as The Jacksons) was an American popular music quintet (and briefly a sextet and quartet) from Gary, Indiana. ... Dusty Springfield OBE (16 April 1939–2 March 1999) was a popular English singer whose career spanned four decades. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ...


‡Introduced by Irene Ryan in the Broadway production and performed by Elisabeth Welch in London. Irene Ryan (October 17, 1902 – April 26, 1973) was an Emmy- and Tony Award-nominated actress, one of the few entertainers who found success in vaudeville, radio, film, television and Broadway. ...


** The song was covered by Michael Jackson, and is included as a bonus track on the 2000 CD release of the Original Broadway Cast Recording. // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ...


††The song was covered by the The Supremes in 1972, and is included as a bonus track on the 2000 CD release of the Original Broadway Cast Recording. For other uses, see Supremes (disambiguation). ...


Productions

Broadway

The show opened at the Imperial Theater on October 23, 1972 and ran for 1,944 performances. It was directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse. The show closed June 12, 1977. The Imperial Theater can also refer to the Imperial Garden Theater in Tokyo, Japan The Imperial Theater was the Schubert brothers fiftieth theater in New York City. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Original cast:

Advertising for the Broadway production broke new ground by being the first commercial that actually showed scenes from a Broadway show.[3] The commercial, which ran 120 seconds, showed Ben Vereen and two other dancers in the instrumental dance sequence from "Glory". The commercial ended with the tagline, "If you liked this minute, just wait until you see the other 119 of them!" Jill Clayburgh (born April 30, 1944) is an American actress of stage, motion pictures, and television. ... Leland Palmer (b. ... Irene Ryan (October 17, 1902 – April 26, 1973) was an Emmy- and Tony Award-nominated actress, one of the few entertainers who found success in vaudeville, radio, film, television and Broadway. ... Ben Vereen (born October 10, 1946) is an American actor. ... John Rubinstein (born 8 December 1946) is an American film and television actor. ...


London

The show opened at Her Majesty's Theatre on October 30, 1973 and ran for 85 performances. Bob Fosse again was director and choreographer. A perfomance at Opera House, Haymarket, predecessor of Her Majestys Theatre in circa 1808. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image Bob Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was a musical theater choreographer and director. ...


London cast:

Patricia Hodge (born on 29 September 1946 in Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, England) is a British actress. ... Northern J. Calloway (January 22, 1948–January 9, 1990) was an American actor who played David on Sesame Street from 1971 through 1989, and also voiced Muppet characters including Same Sound Brown. ... Paul Jones (born Paul Pond, 24 February 1942, in Portsmouth, England) is an English singer, actor, harmonica player, and radio and television presenter. ...

Film

1981

In 1981, a stage production of Pippin was filmed for Canadian television. It was directed by David Sheehan, with Roger O. Hirson in charge of the music. Ben Vereen returned for the role of Leading Player, while William Katt played the role of Pippin. Because of the time restrictions in television, many parts of the play were cut from the broadcast.[4] // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... CTV is a Canadian English language television network. ... William Katt is an American film and television actor. ...


Cast:

Ben Vereen (born October 10, 1946) is an American actor. ... William Katt is an American film and television actor. ... Martha Raye (August 27, 1916 – October 19, 1994) was an American comic actress and singer who performed in movies, and later on television. ... The Dancers Life poster Chita Rivera (born Dolores Conchita Figueroa del Rivero on January 23, 1933 in Washington, D.C.) is a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical actress dancer, and singer best known for her musical theater roles. ...

2003

In 2003, Miramax acquired the feature film rights for Pippin, following the success of the musical, Chicago. No details about the production, including casting or release dates, have been announced. The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... Miramax Films is a film production and distribution brand that was a Big Ten film motion picture distribution and production company headquartered in New York City before being bought out by The Walt Disney Company. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... Chicago is a Kander and Ebb musical set in prohibition era Chicago. ...


References

  1. ^ Playbill News: Long Runs on Broadway
  2. ^ Holahan, Jane. "Creator on ‘Pippin:’ ‘It was an inventive time’", Lancaster Online, 2006-12-07. Retrieved on 2006-12-30. 
  3. ^ Robertson, Campbell (2006-09-10). Broadway, the Land of the Long-Running Sure Thing. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2008-03-25.
  4. ^ Internet Movie Database listing

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Pippin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pippin: Historically Speaking (1502 words)
Initially, Pippin was designed to be a medieval-style pageant presented by a troupe of wandering players; the leader of which was to be an elderly man. When Fosse was hired to direct, a much younger man-a dancer-from the film version of Sweet Charity was contacted for the audition.
Pippin is led through a series of experiences throughout the journey of the play reminiscent of the late-medieval morality drama Everyman.
In turn, Pippin is tempted by and dabbles in greed, lust, gluttony, control, and many of life's other excesses and temptations; all of this leads him to the realization that, ultimately, investing heavily in any of them will not bring him happiness.
Pippin (musical) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (989 words)
Pippin tells the scholars of the time of his dreams and they happily applaud Pippin on his ambitious quest for an extraordinary life.
Pippin plans a revolution, and Fastrada is delighted to hear that perhaps Charles and Pippin will both perish so that her beloved Lewis can become king.
They tell Pippin to jump into a box of fire, light himself up, and "become one with the flame." Pippin is reluctant, but agrees that perhaps suicide is the best way to go, but he is stopped by one actress from the troupe--the woman playing Catherine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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