FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pio of Pietrelcina
Saint Pio of Pietrelcina

Confessor
Born May 25, 1887(1887-05-25), Pietrelcina, Italy
Died September 23, 1968 (aged 81), San Giovanni Rotondo
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Beatified May 2, 1999, Rome, Italy by Pope John Paul II
Canonized June 16, 2002, Rome, Italy by Pope John Paul II
Major shrine San Giovanni Rotondo (where he lived and is now buried)
Feast September 23
Patronage civil defense volunteers, Catholic adolescents, unofficial patron of stress relief and New Year Blues
Saints Portal

Francesco Forgione, later known as Padre Pio, (May 25, 1887September 23, 1968), canonized as Saint Pio of Pietrelcina, was an Italian Roman Catholic Capuchin priest who is now venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church. He was given the name Pio when he joined the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, and was popularly known as Padre Pio after his ordination to the priesthood. He became famous for his stigmata. Padre Pio_photo / public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Pietrelcina is the name of a town and comune in the Province of Benevento, Campania Region, Italy. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The term capuchin can refer to: the capuchin monkeys, genus Cebus, a group of highly intelligent New World monkeys. ... This article is about religious workers. ... For other uses, see Saint (disambiguation). ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, among the chief offshoots of the Franciscans. ... For other senses of this word, see stigma and stigmata (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

Francesco Forgione was born to Grazio Mario Forgione (1860–1946) and Maria Giuseppa de Nunzio Forgione (1859–1929) on May 25, 1887 in Pietrelcina, a farming town in the Southern Italian region of Campania.[1] His parents made a living as shepherds.[2] He was baptized in the nearby Santa Anna Chapel, which stands upon the walls of a castle.[3] He later served as an altar boy in this same chapel. Restoration work on this chapel was later undertaken by the Padre Pio Foundation of America based in Cromwell, Connecticut.[4] His siblings were an older brother, Michele, and three younger sisters: Felicita, Pellegrina, and Grazia (who was later to become a Bridgettine nun).[2] His parents had two other children who died in infancy.[1] When he was baptised, he was given the name Francesco, which was the name of one of these two.[3] He claimed that by the time he was five years old he had already taken the decision to dedicate his entire life to God.[3][1] He is also said to have begun inflicting penances on himself and to have been chided on one occasion by his mother for using a stone as a pillow and sleeping on the stone floor.[5] He worked on the land up to the age of 10, looking after the small flock of sheep the family owned.[6] This delayed his education to some extent.[5] is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Pietrelcina is the name of a town and comune in the Province of Benevento, Campania Region, Italy. ... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... An altar server is a lay assistant to a member of the clergy during a religious service. ... The Bridgettine church in Naantali, Finland The Bridgettine or Briggittine order is a monastic religious order of Augustinian canonesses founded by Saint Birgitta (Saint Bridget) of Sweden approximately 1350, and approved by Pope Urban V in 1370. ...


Pietrelcina was a religion-centric town (feast days of saints were celebrated throughout the year), and religion had a profound influence on the Forgione family. The members of the family attended Daily Mass, prayed the Rosary nightly, and abstained from meat three days a week in honor of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.[3] Although Francesco's parents and grandparents were illiterate; they memorised the Scriptures and narrated Bible stories to their children. It is claimed by his mother that Francesco was able to see and speak with Jesus, the Virgin Mary and his Guardian Angel, and that as a child, he assumed that all people could do so.[7] Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass in place of the dying Pope John Paul II. Mass is the term used of the celebration of the Eucharist in the Latin rites of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... Our Lady of Mount Carmel is a title given to Mary, the mother of Jesus, in honor of her having given the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel to Saint Simon Stock. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... A guardian angel is a spirit who is believed to protect and to guide a particular person. ...


As a youth he claimed to have experienced heavenly visions and ecstasies.[1] In 1897, after he had completed three years at the public school, Francesco was drawn to the life of a friar after listening to a young Capuchin friar who was, at that time, seeking donations in the countryside. When he expressed his desire to his parents, they made a trip to Morcone, a community 13 miles north of Pietrelcina, to find out if their son was eligible to enter the Capuchin Order. The monks there informed them that they were interested in accepting Francesco into their community, but he needed more education qualifications.[3] In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, among the chief offshoots of the Franciscans. ... Morcone is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Benevento in the Italian region Campania, located about 70 km northeast of Naples and about 25 km northwest of Benevento. ...


Francesco's father went to the United States in search of work to pay for private tutoring for his son Francesco so that he might meet the academic requirements to enter the Capuchin Order.[6][1] It was in this period that Francesco took his Confirmation on September 27, 1899.[3] He underwent private tutoring and passed the stipulated academic requirements. On January 6, 1903, at the age of 15, he entered the novitiate of the Capuchin Friars at Morcone, where on January 22 he took the Franciscan habit and the name of Fra (Brother) Pio in honor of Pope Saint Pius V, the patron saint of Pietrelcina.[3] He took the simple vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.[1] confirmed redirects here. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... A novitiate (also called a novice) is a member of a religious order who has not yet taken his/her vows. ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, the chief and only permanent offshoot of the Franciscans. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... St. ... Bold textHe was born as Antonio Ghislieri at Bosco in the duchy of Milan. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... In canon law of the Roman Catholic Church vows are divided into simple vows and solemn vows. ...


Priesthood

To commence his six year study for priesthood and to grow in community life, he travelled to the friary of St. Francis of Assisi by oxcart.[3] Three years later on January 27, 1907 he made his solemn profession. In 1910, Brother Pio was ordained a priest by Archbishop Paolo Schinosi at the Cathedral of Benevento. Four days later, he offered his first Mass at the parish church of Our Lady of the Angels. His health being precarious, he was permitted to remain with his family until early 1916 while still retaining the Capuchin habit.[5] is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Profession, in Christian monasticism, is the act of embracing the religious state by the three vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience according to the rule of a canonically approved religious order; it involves then a triple vow made to God, and binding oneself to the rule of a certain order. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... This article is about religious workers. ... Benevento is a town and comune of Campania, Italy, capital of the province of Benevento, 50 km northeast of Naples. ... The Tridentine Mass (Pontifical High Mass) being celebrated at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Wyandotte, Michigan - 1949. ...


On September 4, 1916, Padre Pio was ordered to return to his community life. Thus he was moved to an agricultural community, Our Lady of Grace Capuchin Friary, located in the Gargano Mountains in San Giovanni Rotondo. Along with Padre Pio, the community had seven friars. He stayed at San Giovanni Rotondo till his death, except for his military service. is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ...


When World War I started, four friars from this community were selected for military service.[8] At that time, Padre Pio was a teacher at the Seminary and a spiritual director.[8] When one more friar was called into service, Padre Pio was put in charge of the community.[8] Then, in the month of August 1917 Padre Pio was also called to military service.[8] Although not in good health, he was assigned to the 4th Platoon of the 100th Company of the Italian Medical Corps.[8] Although hospitalized by mid-October, he was not discharged until March 1918, whereupon he returned to San Giovanni Rotondo and was assigned to work at Santa Maria degli Angeli (Our Lady of the Angels) in Pietrelcina.[8] Later, in response to his growing reputation as a worker of miracles, his superiors assigned him to the friary of San Giovanni Rotondo.[8] In all, his military service lasted 182 days.[8] For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ... A friar is a member of a religious mendicant order of men. ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ...


Padre Pio then became a Spiritual Director, guiding many spiritually, considering them his spiritual daughters and sons. He had five rules for spiritual growth, namely weekly confession, daily Communion, spiritual reading, meditation, and examination of conscience.[8]


He compared weekly confession to dusting a room weekly, and recommended the performance of meditation and self-examination twice daily: once in the morning, as preparation to face the day, and once again in the evening, as retrospection. His advice on the practical application of theology he often summed up in his now famous quote, "Pray, Hope and Don’t Worry" . He directed Christians to recognize God in all things and to desire above all things to do the will of God.[8]


Spiritual suffering and diabolical attacks

Padre Pio believed that the love of God was inseparable from suffering and that suffering all things for the sake of God was the way for the soul to reach God.[6] He felt that his soul was lost in a chaotic maze, plunged into total desolation, as if he were in the deepest pit of hell. During his period of spiritual suffering, his followers believe that Padre Pio was attacked by the Devil, both physically and spiritually.[6] His followers also believe that the devil used diabolical tricks in order to increase Padre Pio's torments. These included apparitions as an "angel of light" and the alteration or destruction of letters to and from his spiritual directors. Padre Augustine confirmed this when he said:

The Devil appeared as young girls that danced naked, as a crucifix, as a young friend of the monks, as the Spiritual Father or as the Provincial Father; as Pope Pius X, a Guardian Angel, as St. Francis and as Our Lady.[9]

In a letter to Padre Agostino dated February 13, 1913, Padre Pio writes: is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Now, twenty-two days have passed, since Jesus allowed the devils to vent their anger on me. My Father, my whole body is bruised from the beatings that I have received to the present time by our enemies. Several times, they have even torn off my shirt so that they could strike my exposed flesh.[9]

Fr. Gabriele Amorth, senior exorcist of Vatican City stated in an interview that Padre Pio was able to distinguish between real apparitions of Jesus, Mary and the Saints and the illusions created by the Devil by carefully analysing the state of his mind and the feelings produced in him during the apparitions. In one of Padre Pio's Letters, he states that he remained patient in the midst of his trials because of his firm belief that Jesus, Mary, his Guardian Angel, St. Joseph and St. Francis were always with him and helped him always.[9] Fr. ...


Transverberation and visible stigmata

Based on Padre Pio's correspondence, even early in his priesthood he experienced less obvious indications of the visible stigmata for which he would later become famous.[10] In a 1911 letter, Padre Pio wrote to his spiritual advisor, Padre Benedetto from San Marco in Lamis, describing something he had been experiencing for a year: For other senses of this word, see stigma and stigmata (disambiguation). ... Province of Foggia San Marco in Lamis is a town and comune in the province of Foggia in the Apulia region of southeast Italy. ...

Then last night something happened which I can neither explain nor understand. In the middle of the palms of my hands a red mark appeared, about the size of a penny, accompanied by acute pain in the middle of the red marks. The pain was more pronounced in the middle of the left hand, so much so that I can still feel it. Also under my feet I can feel some pain.[10]

His close friend Padre Agostino wrote to him in 1915, asking specific questions such as when he first experienced visions, whether he had been granted the stigmata, and whether he felt the pains of the Passion of Christ, namely the crowning of thorns and the scourging. Padre Pio replied that he had been favoured with visions since his novitiate period (1903 to 1904). He wrote that although he had been granted the stigmata, he had been so terrified by the phenomenon he begged the Lord to withdraw them. He did not wish the pain to be removed, only the visible wounds, since, at the time he considered them to be an indescribable and almost unbearable humiliation.[10] The visible wounds disappeared at that point, but reappeared in September 1918.[10] He reported, however, that the pain remained and was more acute on specific days and under certain circumstances. He also said that he was indeed experiencing the pain of the crown of thorns and the scourging. He was not able to clearly indicate the frequency of this experience, but said that he had been suffering from them at least once weekly for some years.[10] The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ...


These experiences are alleged to have caused his health to fail, for which reason he was permitted to stay at home. To maintain his religious life of a friar while away from the community, he said Mass daily and taught at school.


St. John of the Cross describes the phenomenon of transverberation as follows: Saint John of the Cross (Juan de la Cruz) was a Spanish Carmelite friar, born on June 24, 1542 at Fontiveros, a small village near Avila. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

The soul being inflamed with the love of God which is interiorly attacked by a Seraph, who pierces it through with a fiery dart. This leaves the soul wounded, which causes it to suffer from the overflowing of divine love.[2]

World War I was still going on, and in the month of July 1918, Pope Benedict XV who had termed the World War as "the suicide of Europe" appealed to all Christians urging them to pray for an end to the World War. On July 27 of the same year, Padre Pio offered himself as a victim for the end of the war. Days passed and between August 5 and August 7, Padre Pio had a vision in which Christ appeared and pierced his side.[8][2] As a result of this experience, Padre Pio had a physical wound in his side. This occurrence is considered as a "transverberation" or piercing of the heart indicating the union of love with God. Pope Benedict XV (Latin: ), (Italian: Benedetto XV), (November 21, 1854 – January 22, 1922), born Giacomo Paolo Giovanni Battista della Chiesa, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from September 3, 1914 to January 22, 1922; he succeeded Pope Pius X (1903–14). ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


As an interesting side-note, a first-class relic of Padre Pio, which consists of a large framed square of linen bearing a bloodstain from "the wound of the transverberation of the heart" in Padre Pio's side is exposed for public veneration at the St. John Cantius Church in Chicago.[11] For other uses, see Relic (disambiguation). ...


With his transverberation began another seven-week long period of spiritual unrest for Padre Pio. One of his Capuchin brothers said this of his state during that period:

During this time his entire appearance looked altered as if he had died. He was constantly weeping and sighing, saying that God had forsaken him.[2]

In a letter from Padre Pio to Padre Benedetto, dated August 21, 1918 Padre Pio writes of his experiences during the transverberation: is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...

While I was hearing the boys’ confessions on the evening of the 5th [August] I was suddenly terrorized by the sight of a celestial person who presented himself to my mind’s eye. He had in his hand a sort of weapon like a very long sharp-pointed steel blade which seemed to emit fire. At the very instant that I saw all this, I saw that person hurl the weapon into my soul with all his might. I cried out with difficulty and felt I was dying. I asked the boy to leave because I felt ill and no longer had the strength to continue. This agony lasted uninterruptedly until the morning of the 7th. I cannot tell you how much I suffered during this period of anguish. Even my entrails were torn and ruptured by the weapon, and nothing was spared. From that day on I have been mortally wounded. I feel in the depths of my soul a wound that is always open and which causes me continual agony.[11]

On September 20, 1918, accounts state that the pains of the transverberation had ceased and Padre Pio was in "profound peace".[2] On that day, as Padre Pio was engaged in prayer in the choir loft in the Church of Our Lady of Grace, the same Being who had appeared to him and given him the transverberation, and who is believed to be the Wounded Christ, appeared again and Padre Pio had another experience of religious ecstasy.[8] When the ecstasy ended, Padre Pio had received the Visible Stigmata, the five wounds of Christ. This time, however, the stigmata was permanent and would stay on him for the next fifty years of his earthly life.[8][2] is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In a letter from St. Padre Pio to Padre Benedetto, his superior and spiritual advisor, Padre Benedetto from San Marco in Lamis dated October 22, 1918, Padre Pio describes his experience of receiving the Stigmata as follows: Province of Foggia San Marco in Lamis is a town and comune in the province of Foggia in the Apulia region of southeast Italy. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...

On the morning of the 20th of last month, in the choir, after I had celebrated Mass I yielded to a drowsiness similar to a sweet sleep. [...] I saw before me a mysterious person similar to the one I had seen on the evening of 5 August. The only difference was that his hands and feet and side were dripping blood. This sight terrified me and what I felt at that moment is indescribable. I thought I should have died if the Lord had not intervened and strengthened my heart which was about to burst out of my chest. The vision disappeared and I became aware that my hands, feet and side were dripping blood. Imagine the agony I experienced and continue to experience almost every day. The heart wound bleeds continually, especially from Thursday evening until Saturday. Dear Father, I am dying of pain because of the wounds and the resulting embarrassment I feel deep in my soul. I am afraid I shall bleed to death if the Lord does not hear my heartfelt supplication to relieve me of this condition. Will Jesus, who is so good, grant me this grace? Will he at least free me from the embarrassment caused by these outward signs? I will raise my voice and will not stop imploring him until in his mercy he takes away, not the wound or the pain, which is impossible since I wish to be inebriated with pain, but these outward signs which cause me such embarrassment and unbearable humiliation.[11]

Though Padre Pio would have preferred to suffer in secret, by early 1919, news about the stigmatic friar began to spread in the secular world. Padre Pio’s wounds were examined by many people, including physicians.[2] People who had started rebuilding their lives after World War I began to see in Padre Pio a symbol of hope.[8] Those close to him attest that he began to manifest several spiritual gifts including the gifts of healing, bilocation, levitation, prophecy, miracles, extraordinary abstinence from both sleep and nourishment (One account states that Padre Agostino recorded one instance in which Padre Pio was able to subsist for at least 20 days at Verafeno on only the Eucharist without any other nourishment), the ability to read hearts, the gift of tongues, the gift of conversions, and the fragrance from his wounds.[8][6] Bilocation, sometimes multilocation, or astral projection is a term used to describe the ability/instances in which an individual or object is said to be, or appear to be, located in two distinct places at the same instant in time. ... For other uses, see Levitation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... For the religious phenomenon, see Glossolalia. ...


Controversies

Accusations made against Padre Pio

As Padre Pio's fame grew, his ministry began to take the center-stage at the friary. Many pilgrims flocked to see him and he spent around nineteen hours each day saying Mass, hearing confessions and corresponding, often sleeping not even two hours per day.[8] His fame had the negative side effect that accusations against him made their way to the Holy Office in Rome (since 1983, known as the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith[12]), causing many restrictions to be placed on him. His accusers included high-ranking archbishops, bishops, theologians and physicians.[13]


Nature of the charges

They brought several accusations against him, including insanity, immoral attitude towards women - claims that he had intercourse with women in the confessional; misuse of funds, and deception - claims that the stigmata were induced with acid in order to gain fame, and that the reported odor of sanctity around him being the result of self-administered eau-de-cologne.[14]


The founder of Rome's Catholic university hospital concluded Padre Pio was "an ignorant and self-mutilating psychopath who exploited people's credulity."[14] In short, he was accused of infractions against all three of his monastic vows: poverty, chastity and obedience.[13]


In 1923, he was forbidden to teach teenage boys in the school attached to the monastery because he was considered "a noxious Socrates, capable of perverting the fragile lives and souls of boys."[15] This page is about the Classical Greek philosopher. ...


Investigations

Padre Pio was subject to numerous investigations.[16][17] Fearing local riots, a plan to transfer Padre Pio to another friary was dropped and a second plan was aborted when a riot almost happened.[13] In the period from 1924 to 1931 the Holy See made various statements denying that the happenings in the life of Padre Pio were due to any divine cause.[16][8] At one point, he was prevented from performing all his priestly duties (such as hearing confessions), except for saying Mass, and even that was to be done in private.[16]


Papal views on the situation in the 1930s

By 1933, the tide began to turn, with Pope Pius XI ordering the Holy See to reverse its ban on Padre Pio’s public celebration of Mass. The Pope said, "I have not been badly disposed toward Padre Pio, but I have been badly informed."[8] In 1934, he was again allowed to hear confessions. He was also given honorary permission to preach despite never having taken the exam for the preaching licence.[8] Pope Pius XII, who assumed the papacy in 1939, encouraged devotees to visit Padre Pio. Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Home to Relieve Suffering

In 1940, Padre Pio began plans to open a hospital in San Giovanni Rotondo, to be named the Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza or "Home to Relieve Suffering"; the hospital opened in 1956.[16][8] Barbara Ward, a British humanitarian and journalist on assignment in Italy, played a major role in obtaining for this project a grant of $325,000 from the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA). In order that Padre Pio might directly supervise this project, Pope Pius XII, in 1957 granted him dispensation from his vow of poverty.[17][18] Padre Pio's detractors used this project as another weapon to attack him, charging him with misappropriation of funds.[17] When it seemed to the public that Padre Pio would be forever in public disgrace, it was Pope Paul VI who, in the mid 1960s, firmly dismissed all accusations against Padre Pio.[17][13] For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Casa Sollievo della sofferenza. ... Barbara Ward Barbara Mary Ward (1914 - 1981) was a British economist and writer interested in the problems of developing countries. ... The United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) was founded in 1943 to provide relief to areas liberated from Axis powers. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ...


Death

Padre Pio’s cell in Our Lady of Grace Friary, San Giovanni Rotondo.

The deterioration of Padre Pio's health started during the 1960s in spite of which he continued his spiritual works. Due to Padre Pio's advanced age and deteriorating health, Pope Paul VI granted Padre Pio special permission to continue saying the Traditional Latin Mass following the institution of certain liturgical changes following the Second Vatican Council.[15] On September 21, 1968, the day after the 50th anniversary of his receiving the Stigmata, Padre Pio experienced great tiredness.[19] The next day, on September 22, 1968 Padre Pio was supposed to offer a Solemn Mass, but feeling weak and fearing that he might be too ill to complete the Mass, he asked his superior if he might say a Low Mass instead, just as he had done daily for years. Due to the large number of pilgrims present for the Mass, Padre Pio's superior decided the Solemn Mass must proceed, and so Padre Pio, in the spirit of obedience to his superior, went on to celebrate the Solemn Mass. While celebrating the Solemn Mass, Padre Pio appeared extremely weak and in a fragile state. His voice was weak when he said the Mass, and after the Mass had concluded, he was so weakened that he almost collapsed as he was descending the altar steps and needed help from a great many of his Capuchin confreres. This would be Padre Pio's last celebration of the Mass. Monastery of St. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... A Tridentine Mass being celebrated in Bohermeen, Ireland in the 1950s. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other senses of this word, see stigma and stigmata (disambiguation). ... Please note that this page is still under construction. ... Until the changes brought in following the Second Vatican Council, a Low Mass or Missa Lecta was one said by a priest alone, with the assistance of one or two servers. ... Please note that this page is still under construction. ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, among the chief offshoots of the Franciscans. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ...


Early in the morning of September 23, 1968, Padre Pio made his last confession and renewed his Franciscan vows.[8] As was customary, he had his Rosary in his hands, though he did not have the strength to say the Hail Marys aloud.[19] Till the end, he repeated the words "Gesú, Maria" (Jesus, Mary). At around 2:30am, he said, "I see two mothers" (taken to mean his mother and Mary).[19] At 2:30am he breathed his last in his cell in San Giovanni Rotondo with his last breath whispering, "Maria!"[1] is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the practice of confession in the Christian faith. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Hail Mary...


His body was buried on September 26 in a crypt in the Church of Our Lady of Grace. His funeral was attended by over 100,000 people. He was often heard to say, "After my death I will do more. My real mission will begin after my death".[19] The accounts of those who stayed with Padre Pio till the end state that the stigmata had completely disappeared without even leaving a scar. Only a red mark "as if drawn by a red pencil" remained on his side which then disappeared.[19] is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Posthumous controversies

Town commercialization

The commercialization of the monastery town, San Giovanni Rotondo, has been criticized: "Alessandro Maggiolini, Bishop of Como and an eminent theologian, spoke out [the day before St. Pio's canonization] against the vast industry that has grown up around him. "Jesus Christ chased out the merchants from the temple, but I see now that they have returned," he said in an interview with the Italian daily La Repubblica".[20] Monastery of St. ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... La Repubblica (meaning: The Republic) is an Italian daily newspaper. ...


Alleged supernatural phenomena

Padre Pio during the celebration of Mass. His Mass would often last hours, as the mystic received visions and experienced sufferings. Note the coverings worn on his hands to cover his stigmata.
Padre Pio during the celebration of Mass. His Mass would often last hours, as the mystic received visions and experienced sufferings. Note the coverings worn on his hands to cover his stigmata.

Padre Pio acquired fame as a miracle worker, and, like John Vianney, was purported to have the gift of reading souls. He is alleged to have been able to bilocate according to eyewitness accounts.[21] Image File history File links Padre_Pio_during_Mass. ... Image File history File links Padre_Pio_during_Mass. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ... St. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... Bilocation, sometimes multilocation, or astral projection is a term used to describe the ability/instances in which an individual or object is said to be, or appear to be, located in two distinct places at the same instant in time. ...


In 1947, Father Karol Józef Wojtyła, a young Polish priest who would later go on to become Pope John Paul II, visited Padre Pio who heard his confession. Although not mentioned in George Weigel's biography Witness to Hope, which contains an account of the same visit, Austrian Cardinal Alfons Stickler reported that Wojtyła confided to him that during this meeting Padre Pio told him he would one day ascend to "the highest post in the Church."[22] Cardinal Sticker further went on to say that Wojtyła believed that the prophecy was fulfilled when he became a Cardinal, not Pope, as has been reported in works of piety.[23] For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ... George Weigel (Baltimore, 1951 - ) is an American Catholic author, and political and social activist. ... Alfons Maria Cardinal Stickler (born 23 August 1910) is an Austrian ecclesiastic and cardinal. ...


Bishop Wojtyła wrote to Padre Pio in 1962 to ask him to pray for Dr. Wanda Poltawska, a friend in Poland who was thought to be suffering from cancer. Later, Dr. Poltawska's cancer was found to have regressed; medical professionals were unable to offer an explanation for the phenomenon.[24] Generally, regression is related to moving backwards, and the opposite of progression. ...


Because of the unusual abilities Padre Pio possessed, the Holy See twice instituted investigations of the stories surrounding him. However, the Church has since formally approved his veneration with his canonization by Pope John Paul II in 2002. This article is about the process of declaring saints. ...


In the 1999 book, Padre Pio: The Wonder Worker, a segment by Irish priest Malachy Gerard Carroll describes the story of Gemma de Giorgi, a Sicilian girl whose alleged blindness some believe was corrected during a visit to the Capuchin priest.[25] Gemma, who was brought to San Giovanni Rotondo in 1947 by her grandmother, was born without pupils.[25] During her trip to see Padre Pio, the little girl reportedly began to see objects including a steamboat and the sea.[25] Gemma's grandmother did not believe the child had been healed.[25] After Gemma forgot to ask Padre Pio for Grace during her Confession, her grandmother reportedly implored the priest to ask God to restore her sight.[25] Padre Pio, according to Carroll, told her, "The child must not weep and neither must you for the child sees and you know she sees."[25] The section goes on to say that occulists were unable to determine how she gained vision.[25] Padre Pio is alleged to have waged physical combat with Satan, similar to incidents described concerning St. John Vianney, from which he is said to have sustained extensive bruising. He is also said to have possessed the ability to communicate with guardian angels, often granting favors and healings prior to any written or verbal request. Actual grace is, in Catholic theology, a supernatural help of God -- Divine grace -- for salutary acts. ... This article is about the practice of confession in the Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ... Optometry (Greek: optos meaning seen or visible and metria meaning measurement) is a health care profession concerned with eyes and related structures, vision, visual system and vision information processing in humans. ... St. ...


Stigmata

Padre Pio showing stigmata under orders
Padre Pio showing stigmata under orders

On September 20, 1918, while saying confessions, Padre Pio is said to have had his first occurrence of stigmata—bodily marks, pain, and bleeding in locations corresponding to the crucifixion wounds of Jesus Christ. This phenomenon allegedly continued for fifty years, until the end of his life. The blood flowing from the stigmata is said to have smelled of perfume or flowers, a phenomenon mentioned in stories of the lives of several saints and often referred to as the odour of sanctity. Image File history File links Padre-Pio-young. ... Image File history File links Padre-Pio-young. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... For other senses of this word, see stigma and stigmata (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Saint (disambiguation). ... The Odour of Sanctity or Odor of Sanctity, according to the Catholic Church, is commonly understood to mean a specific scent (often compared to flowers) that emanates from the bodies of saints, especially from the wounds of stigmata. ...


His stigmata, regarded by some as evidence of holiness, was studied by physicians whose independence from the Church is not known.[16][17] The observations were reportedly unexplainable and the wounds never infected.[16][17] It was reputed, however, that his condition caused him great embarrassment, and most photographs show him with red mittens or black coverings on his hands and feet where the bleedings occurred.[17]


At Padre Pio's death in 1968, his body appeared unwounded, with no sign of scarring. There was even a report that doctors who examined his body found it empty of all blood.[26] Photos taken of his bare feet and hands during his funeral procession created some scandal with allegations of stigmata fraud, although believers saw the disappearance of the marks as yet another miracle. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Accusations of fraud

Historian Sergio Luzzatto and others, both religious and non-religious, have accused Padre Pio of faking his stigmata. Luzzatto's theory, namely that Padre Pio used carbolic acid to self-inflict the wounds, is based on a document found in the Vatican's archive — the testimony of a pharmacist at the San Giovanni Rotondo, Maria De Vito, from whom he ordered 4 grams of the acid.[27] According to De Vito, Padre Pio asked her to keep the order secret, saying it was to sterilise needles. The document was examined but dismissed by the Catholic Church during Padre Pio's beatification process.[27] Phenol or carbolic acid is a white crystalline solid, with a chemical formula of C6H5OH, a melting point of 43 C, and a boiling point of 182 C at the pressure of 1 atmosphere (or 101080 Pa). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


One commentator expressed the belief that the Church likely dismissed the claims based on alleged evidence that the acid was in fact used for sterilization: "The boys had needed injections to fight the Spanish Flu which was raging at that time. Due to a shortage of doctors, Padres Paolino and Pio administered the shots, using carbolic acid as a sterilizing agent.”[28][27]


Sainthood

Padre Pio was considered exceptionally holy even during his lifetime. In 1971, Pope Paul VI, speaking to the superiors of the Capuchin Order, said of him: This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, among the chief offshoots of the Franciscans. ...

Look what fame he had, what a worldwide following gathered around him! But why? Perhaps because he was a philosopher? Because he was wise? Because he had resources at his disposal? Because he said Mass humbly, heard confessions from dawn to dusk and was–it is not easy to say it–one who bore the wounds of our Lord. He was a man of prayer and suffering.

In 1982, the Holy See authorized the archbishop of Manfredonia to open an investigation to discover whether Padre Pio should be considered a saint. The investigation went on for seven years, and in 1990 Padre Pio was declared a Servant of God, the first step in the progression to canonization. Servant of God is the title given to a person of the Roman Catholic Church upon whom a pope has opened a cause of sainthood. ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ...


Beginning in 1990, the Congregation for the Causes of Saints debated how heroically Padre Pio had lived his life, and in 1997 Pope John Paul II declared him venerable. A discussion of the effects of his life on others followed, including the cure of an Italian woman, Consiglia de Martino, which had been associated with Padre Pio's intercession. In 1999, on the advice of the Congregation, John Paul II declared Padre Pio blessed. The Congregation for the Causes of Saints (Congregatio de Causis Sanctorum) is the congregation of the Roman Curia which oversees the complex process which leads to the canonization of saints, passing through the steps of a declaration of heroic virtues and beatification. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... // Christianity In Christian practice, intercessory prayer is the act of one person praying for or on behalf of another person or situation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


After further consideration of Padre Pio's virtues and ability to do good even after his death, including discussion of another healing attributed to his intercession, the Pope declared Padre Pio a saint on June 16, 2002.[23] Three hundred thousand people were estimated to have attended the canonization ceremony.[23] is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ...


Later recognition

On July 1, 2004, Pope John Paul II dedicated the Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church in San Giovanni Rotondo to the memory of Saint Pio of Pietrelcina.[29] is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Padre Pio Pilgrimage Church is a church in San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy owned by the Provincia dei Frati Minori Cappuccini di Foggia. ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ...


A statue of Saint Pio in Messina, Sicily attracted attention in 2002 when it allegedly wept tears of blood.[30] Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...


Patron saint of New Year Blues

In the year 2006, the Catholic Enquiry Office (CEO) in London declared Saint Pio as the patron saint of stress relief and the January blues, following a formula published by Cliff Arnall of Cardiff University's Centre for Lifelong Learning that declared that Monday, January 23, 2006 would be the most depressing day of the year.[31][32] The CEO launched Don't Worry Be Happy Day to counter the effect of this depression and declared St. Pio as the patron saint of this day. Clare Ward, spokesperson of the CEO explained that this decision was based on their belief that Padre Pio's famous spiritual advice "Pray, Hope, and Don't Worry!" would help drive out despair from the minds of people.[33] is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Exhumation

On March 3, 2008 the body of Saint Pio was exhumed from his crypt so that his remains could be prepared for display. Witnesses described Pio's body as being in fair condition. Archbishop Domenico D'Ambrosio, papal legate to the shrine in San Giovanni Rotondo, stated that St. Pio's hands "looked like they had just undergone a manicure". It is hoped that morticians will be able to restore the face so that it will be recognizable. Current plans call for Pio's body to be placed in a glass coffin and displayed after April 24th.[34] Archbishop D’Ambrosio confirmed in a communiqué that “the stigmata are not visible.” [35] is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... A papal Legate, from the Decretals of Boniface VIII (1294 to 1303). ... San Giovanni Rotondo is the name of a city and comune in the Province of Foggia, Puglia region, Italy. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

This is a list of people on the postage stamps of the Republic of Ireland, including the years when they appeared on a stamp. ... A weeping statue is a statue which has been observed to be shedding tears or weeping. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Ruffin, Bernard C. (1991), Padre Pio: The True Story, Our Sunday Visitor, pp. 444, ISBN 9780879736736
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Gerhold, Ryan (02/20/2007), "The Second St. Francis", The Angelus: 12-18
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Padre Pio the Man Part 1, <http://www.ewtn.com/padrepio/man/biography.htm>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  4. ^ Peluso, Paul (06/17/2002), "Back to Pietrelcina", Padre Pio Foundation, <http://www.padrepio.com/app19.html>. Retrieved on 20 January 2008
  5. ^ a b c Nolan, Geraldine, Padre Pio A living Crucifix, Our Lady of Grace Capuchin Friary Editions, <http://www.padrepio.org.uk/padrepiointro.html#EarlyYears>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  6. ^ a b c d e Pelletier, Joseph A (02/20/2007), "PADRE PIO, MARY, AND THE ROSARY", Garabandal, <http://www.garabandal.us/padre_maryrosary.html>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  7. ^ A Short Biography of Padre Pio. Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Padre Pio the Man Part 2, <http://www.ewtn.com/padrepio/man/biography2.htm>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  9. ^ a b c Padre Pio da Pietrelcina Epistolario I° (1910-1922). Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  10. ^ a b c d e Mc Gregor, O.C.S.O, Augustine; Fr. Alessio Parente, OFM Cap. (1974). The Spirituality of Padre Pio. San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy: Our Lady of Grace Monastery. Retrieved on 2008-01-19. 
  11. ^ a b c First class relic of St. Padre Pio of Pietrelcina at St. John Cantius Church, <http://www.cantius.org/go/organizations/relic_of_st_padre_pio_of_pietrelcina>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  12. ^ TranslationDirectory.com: Glossary of religious terms (Starting with "I"). Retrieved on September 26, 2006.
  13. ^ a b c d Allen, John L. (December 28, 2001), For all who feel put upon by the Vatican: A new patron saint of Holy Rehabilitation, vol. 1, <http://www.nationalcatholicreporter.org/word/word1228.htm>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  14. ^ a b Vallely, Paul (06/17/2002), "Vatican makes a saint of the man it silenced", New Zealand Herald, <http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/2/story.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=2047151>. Retrieved on 20 January 2008
  15. ^ a b Bronski, Michael (July 18, 2002), The politics of sainthood, <http://www.bostonphoenix.com/boston/news_features/top/features/documents/02350558.htm>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  16. ^ a b c d e f "The Stigmatist", 12/19/1949. Retrieved on 2008-01-19. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f g "A Padre's Patience", 04/24/1964. Retrieved on 2008-01-19. 
  18. ^ Marie osb, Dom Antoine (04/24/2000). Letter on Blessed Pader Pio: Stigmata - Sacraments of Penance and Eucharist - Suffering. Retrieved on 2006-09-27.
  19. ^ a b c d e Schug, Rev. John (1987), A Padre Pio Profile, Huntington, ISBN 9780879738563
  20. ^ Grimond, Jessie. "Million to see canonisation of Padre Pio, the miracle monk who makes fortunes", The Independent, 2002-06-16, p. 17. Retrieved on 2007-05-04. 
  21. ^ Carroll-Cruz, Joan (March 1997). Mysteries Marvels and Miracles In the Lives of the Saints. Illinois: TAN Books, 581. ISBN 978-0895555410. 
  22. ^ Kwitny, Jonathan (March 1997). Man of the Century: The Life and Times of Pope John Paul II. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 768. ISBN 978-0805026887. 
  23. ^ a b c Zahn, Paula (June 17, 2002), "Padre Pio Granted Sainthood", CNN, <http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0206/17/ltm.04.html>. Retrieved on 19 January 2008
  24. ^ Rega, Frank M. (2005), Padre Pio and America, TAN Books, pp. 308, ISBN 978-0895558206
  25. ^ a b c d e f g Kalvelage, Bro. Francis Mary (1999), Padre Pio: The Wonder Worker, Ignatius Press, pp. 210, ISBN 978-0898707700
  26. ^ Padre Pio's Cell. Padre Pio Foundation (2006-05-12). Retrieved on 2006-05-12.
  27. ^ a b c Moore, Malcolm. "Italy's Padre Pio 'faked his stigmata with acid'", 10/24/2007. Retrieved on 2008-01-19. 
  28. ^ Rega (2005), p. 55
  29. ^ Guardian Unlimited Arts. Monumental church dedicated to controversial saint Padre Pio (2004-07-02). Retrieved on 2006-05-12.
  30. ^ BBC News. Italian statue weeps blood (2002-03-06). Retrieved on 2006-05-12.
  31. ^ Living.Scotsman.com article on Mr. Arnall's formula.
  32. ^ Catholic Communications Network (19 January 2006). "New Special Saint’ Declared to Fight the January Blues - January 23rd". Press release. Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  33. ^ Gilchrist, Jim. "It's 23 January...have a bad day", 23 January 2006. Retrieved on 2008-01-19. 
  34. ^ Pullella, Phillip (2008-03-03). Popular Italian Catholic saint exhumed 40 years on (English). Reuters Limited. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  35. ^ St. Padre Pio's Body Exhumed (English). Zenit. Retrieved on 2008-03-06.

C. Bernard Ruffin (b. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the state. ... Paula Zahn (born February 24, 1956 in Omaha, Nebraska) is an American newscaster, most recently the host of Paula Zahn NOW on CNN. On 24 July 2007, she resigned from CNN. The last broadcast of Paula Zahn Now on CNN aired August 2, 2007. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

External links

Official links

Other links

James Strong (1822-1894) Strongs Concordance (strictly Strongs Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible) is a concordance of the King James Bible (KJV) that was constructed under the direction of Dr. James Strong (1822–1894) and first published in 1890. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Los mejores libros sobre el Padre San Pío de Pietrelcina (601 words)
Meet Padre Pio : Beloved Mystic, Miracle Worker, and Spiritual Guide This brief biography of Padre Pio is designed to introduce readers to one of the most popular and beloved saints of the 20th century.
Padre Pio : The Wonder Worker "Complete with numerous photos of the Saint and rich chapters about the life of this holy man this is a title you'll turn to again and again".
Padre Pio : The Conversion On September 20, 1918, the five wounds of Christ's passion appeared on the hands, feet, and side of Francesco Forgione, a Capuchin monk later known as Padre Pio, making him the first stigmatized priest in the history of the Roman Catholic Church.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m