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Encyclopedia > Pinky and the Brain
Pinky and the Brain
Format Animated series
Created by Tom Ruegger
Starring Maurice LaMarche
Rob Paulsen
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
No. of episodes 65 (plus 13 episodes of Pinky, Elmyra, and the Brain)
(List of episodes)
Production
Producer(s) Steven Spielberg
Running time 11 min or 22 min (depending on the episode)
Broadcast
Original channel The WB
Original run September 9, 1995September 28, 1998
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Pinky and the Brain (sometimes abbreviated PatB or P&tB) are cartoon characters who have starred in the American animated television series Steven Spielberg Presents Animaniacs, Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky and the Brain, and Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 418 × 599 pixels Full resolution (515 × 738 pixel, file size: 64 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Pinky and the Brain This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work or product in... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Tom Ruegger is an American animation writer, producer, director, and chairman of the Warner Bros Animation. ... Maurice LaMarche (born March 30, 1958) is a Canadian voice actor and former stand up comedian. ... This article is about the voice actor Rob Paulsen. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following is an episode list for the Warner Brothers animated television series Pinky and the Brain, which ran from 1995 to 1998. ... Pinky and the Brain are cartoon characters from the animated television series Animaniacs. ... The following is an episode list for the Warner Brothers animated television series Pinky and the Brain, which ran from 1995 to 1998. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... The Warner Bros. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... This article is about the television series. ... Pinky and the Brain are cartoon characters from the American animated television series Animaniacs. ...


Pinky and the Brain first appeared in 1993 as a recurring segment on the show, Animaniacs. From 1995 to 1998, Pinky and the Brain were spun-off into their own the Emmy-award-winning show on The WB Television Network, Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky and the Brain, with 65 episodes produced by Steven Spielberg and Warner Bros. Animation. Later, they appeared in the unsuccessful series, Steven Spielberg Presents Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain. An Emmy Award. ... The Warner Bros. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Warner Bros. ...


Pinky and Brain are genetically enhanced lab mice who reside in a cage in the Acme Labs research facility. In each episode, Brain devises a new plan for the two mice (led by Brain) to take over the world, which ultimately ends in failure. In common with many other Animaniacs shorts, many episodes are in some way a parody of something else, usually a film or novel. The cartoon's famous tagline is: Kenyans examining insect-resistant transgenic Bt corn. ... This article is about the animal. ... The Acme Corporation (sometimes made a backronym to: A Company (that) Makes Everything - though this is in dispute) is a fictional corporation that exists in the Looney Tunes universe. ... Alexander the Great Philip II of Spain Napoleon Bonaparte For other uses, see World domination (disambiguation). ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...

Pinky: "Gee Brain, what do you want to do tonight?"
The Brain: "The same thing we do every night, Pinky—Try to take over the world."

Background

Premise

Acme Labs

Most of the Pinky and the Brain episodes occur in the present time at Acme Labs, located in some large American metropolitan city, presumably Los Angeles as to tie in with Animaniacs and the Warner Brothers studio lot. However, several episodes took place in historical times, with Pinky and the Brain under the laboratory care of some scientifically-minded person, including Merlin,[1] H.G. Wells[2] and Ivan Pavlov.[3] The bulk of every episode involves one of Brain's plans for world domination with Pinky's assistance, and the ultimate failure of that plan. One centers on his rival Snowball's plan to take over the world using Microsponge.[4] Another episode features Brain's single day where he tries to do anything but take over the world, but in the end, a group of a people vote that he should take over the world on the one day he is not wanting to.[5] There is very little continuity on the show outside of the common fixtures of the mice, though some plans for world domination from early episodes are subsequently referred to in later seasons (for example, Brain's "human suit" used in "Win Big"[6] reappears when Brain faces against Snowball in "Snowball".[4]) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Warner Bros. ... For other uses, see Merlin (disambiguation). ... H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... For other uses, see Pavlov (disambiguation). ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ...


Both Pinky and the Brain, white mice kept as part of Acme Labs' experimentation have undergone significant genetic alteration; as per the show's title lyrics, "their genes have been spliced" which gives the two mice amplified intelligence over that of a typical mouse, the ability to talk to humans, and anthropomorphism. "Project B.R.A.I.N." suggests that the gene splicing occurred on September 9, 1995,[7] coincident to the first full episode of Pinky and the Brain. The episode "Brainwashed" states that the gene splicing was done by Dr. Mordough, along with Snowball the hamster and Precious the cat, using the Acme "Gene Splicer and Bagel Warmer".[8] This article is about the general scientific term. ... In genetics, splicing is a modification of genetic information after transcription, in which introns of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) are removed and exons of it are joined. ... 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Categories: Stub | Science fiction novels | 1896 books | 1933 films | 1977 films | 1996 films | Steampunk ... For other uses, see Bagel (disambiguation). ...


Although Pinky and the Brain plan to conquer the earth, they do not show much antagonism; in a Christmas special Pinky even wrote to Santa that Brain had the world's best interests at heart.[9] Look up Antagonism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


Characters

The Brain

The Brain bears a resemblance to Orson Welles, particularly in his vocal characteristics. Brain is highly intelligent and develops Rube Goldberg plans for global domination. His tail is bent like a staircase (which he often uses to pick the lock of the cage), and his head is large and wide, supposedly housing his abnormally large brain. He appears to be coldly unemotional and speaks in a deadpan manner. Nevertheless, Brain has a very subtle sense of humor, and has even fallen in love once, with Billie.[10] This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This postcard book, Rube Goldbergs Inventions!, was compiled by Maynard Frank Wolfe from the Rube Goldberg Archives. ... Global domination, global conquest, taking over the world, world conquest, or world domination is an ambitious goal in which one government, one ideology or belief system, or even one person, seeks to secure complete political control of the entire planet. ...


Intellectually, Brain sees his inevitable rise to power as beneficial to the world rather than mere megalomania. In one episode, when Brain finds himself under the influence of hypnosis by a psychologist he had planned to manipulate for one of his schemes (None other than Sigmund Freud), it is revealed that Brain lived in a can with his parents when he was young. The researchers took him from his home, and the last he saw of it was a picture of the world on the side of the can. The psychologist speculates that Brain's hunger to take over the world stems from needing to get his world back.[11] This may be another allusion to Orson Welles as it is very similar to an important plot point in Welles' movie Citizen Kane. This article is about the psychopathological condition. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ...


The characteristics of Brain would lead one to believe that he is more suited to be an antagonist rather than a protagonist, but the series tends to present him as a quixotic fellow[12] striving for greatness against the odds, evoking sympathy from the audience and causing viewers to like him, despite his plans for world domination. Such a thing is typical of an anti-hero, which many consider Brain to be. The absurdity of a normally insignificant creature hungering for world dominance adds to the comical effect, and one senses a Napoleon complex within him,[13] despite the gravitas of his Wellesian diction — highlighted when other characters inadvertently become as smart as or smarter than he. Unfortunately for the Brain, his schemes are inevitably doomed to failure by reason of one or more of a few common mishaps: Pinky doing something idiotic to ruin the plan, Brain gravely under/overestimating the masses' intelligence, or, simply, bad luck. Sometimes, Brain's plans fail because he failed to take a critical fact into account until it is too late. For instance, to steal the gold of Fort Knox, he develops a way to immobilize the human population, but fails to realize that gold is too heavy for two mice to carry off until they are crushed after attempting to lift a single ingot. In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... This photograph, a cow with antlers standing on a pole, is an example of surreal humour. ... Napoleon complex (also, Napoleon syndrome or Small Man syndrome) is a colloquial pejorative term used to describe a type of inferiority complex which is said to affect people who are short. ... Look up gravitas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about United States Army post. ...


It may be that Brain overthinks his plans; in "Brain's Night Out", when Brain doesn't even try to take over the world, he manages to cause many people to want to follow him as their leader.[5] In many of Brain's plans, he plainly says to one of the people he is trying to fool that he is actually a genetically altered lab mouse bent on world domination, but the person usually takes it as a joke. That habit has been the reason one of his plans failed. A possible reason he keeps doing this is that he is testing the humans' intelligence. Brain rarely seeks to do anybody direct harm, and in many episodes he rescues Pinky and other mice from being killed. He has, on numerous occasions, worked to defend the world from others who seek world domination. Though he rarely admits it, due mainly to his immense sense of pride, Brain actually cares for Pinky deeply as a friend, which is probably the only reason he has not abandoned him for his incessant incompetence. Brain states on one occasion that he wanted to take over the world in order to make it a better place, after saving the world from his arch-rival, Snowball the Hamster.[4]


Brain's name is revealed in "Project B.R.A.I.N." to result from the acronym for "Biological Recombinant Algorithmic Intelligence Nexus".[7] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ...


The Brain is voiced by Maurice LaMarche. Maurice LaMarche (born March 30, 1958) is a Canadian voice actor and former stand up comedian. ...


Pinky

Pinky is another genetically modified mouse who shares the same cage at Acme Labs, but is substantially less bright. He speaks with an exaggerated Cockney English accent. He frequently uses nonsensical interjections, such as "narf", "zort", "poit", and "troz" (the last of which Pinky started saying after noticing it was "zort in the mirror"). He also used "fjord" and "gnurf" on unique occasions, and "natch" in an episode set in the film noir era,[14] as well as "hark" in an episode that was partly set in the medieval era.[1] St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ... A tic is a repeated, impulsive action, almost reflexive in nature, which the actor feels powerless to control or avoid. ... Fjord in Sunnmøre, Norway Geirangerfjord, Norway A fjord (or fiord) is a long, narrow estuary with steep sides, made when a glacial valley is filled by rising sea water levels. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ...


Although Pinky is also an albino lab mouse like the Brain, he has a straighter tail, a severe overbite, and is taller than the Brain. Pinky is more open-minded than the Brain (evidenced best, perhaps, by his crush on a similar-looking horse named Phar Fig Newton[15]), and much more up-beat. He doesn't let troubles ruin his day, mostly because he's too scatter-brained to notice them. Pinky also works with Brain notwithstanding the fact that Brain insults him constantly and often beats him over the head. However, Pinky actually seems to enjoy this, laughing after every hit. Pinky is just happy spending time with his best friend. Albinism is a genetic condition resulting in a lack of pigmentation in the eyes, skin and hair. ...


Pinky has a number of unusual special abilities, something like 'magic', but caused by his genetic engineering. Most notably, he occasionally levitates, but also has been known to come up with insights in a manner more typical of Brain, contrasting with his otherwise stupid appearance. This was also demonstrated in "The Pinky POV"[16] where viewers get a 'Pinky-Vision' of one of the typical night's activities (i.e. taking over the world), and discover that Pinky is in fact extremely intelligent, but in a totally unexpected way — he actually has a great imagination coupled with a very highly developed degree of extrapolation. His seemingly random statements actually arise from an observation, tempered by a whimsical imagination, which then is extrapolated to an absurd conclusion. For instance, on seeing the Brain in a distorting mirror, he imagines him fatter, and then the query 'what if the Brain looked like a Hippopotamus?' leads to thoughts about the "unmentionables" that a Hippopotamus would wear, and finally to the utterance — 'Yes Brain, but what if the Hippopotamus won't wear the thong?' Pinky also tends to take things very literally, for example when Brain ends a sentence with "…and there the genius lies!" and Pinky responds, "Having a nap is he?" In mathematics, extrapolation is the process of constructing new data points outside a discrete set of known data points. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758[2] Range map[1] The hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), from the Greek ‘ιπποπόταμος (hippopotamos, hippos meaning horse and potamos meaning river), often shortened to hippo, is a large, mostly plant-eating African mammal, one of only two extant species in the family Hippopotamidae (the other being the Pygmy... See Thong for other meanings. ...


Another example of his hidden intelligence was demonstrated in "The Maze" when the two mice were placed into an elaborate maze by a group of scientists. One particular obstacle the pair had to overcome was a holographic projector that would tempt them by showing them whatever they most desired, initially showing them the piece of cheese marking the exit, which would then burst into flames when approached. Pinky amazed the Brain by approaching the device, against the Brain's advice, says thats he wishes they had a map, and at which point the hologram displayed a complete map of the maze — as Pinky's most pressing desire was to wish for a map that would lead them to the maze's exit.[17]


Pinky's name is given to him by Brain, thinking that Brain was calling to him when in fact Brain was referring to his pinky digit.[7] The pinky finger is the last and usually smallest finger on the far sides of the human hand, opposite the thumb, next to the ring finger. ...


Pinky is voiced by Rob Paulsen. This article is about the voice actor Rob Paulsen. ...


Snowball

Snowball (left) and the Brain

A recurring character in the series is Snowball the Hamster, Brain's former friend. The two were both subjected to genetic splicing, and thus both became super-intelligent. In the self-titled introductory story,[4] Snowball builds a gigantic robotic body (similar to the Brain's robotic body, except Snowball's robot body has a mask), Bill Grates, and takes control of Microsponge. Snowball uses Microsponge to buy 51 percent of the world and its institutions, and thus, to Brain's limitless horror, Snowball actually succeeds in taking over the world. Brain retaliates by reactivating his own robot body, and fights Snowball. In the process, Snowball's robot body, i.e. Bill Grates, explodes, resulting in the downfall of Microsponge and the end of Snowball's reign. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Genera Mesocricetus Phodopus Cricetus Cricetulus Allocricetulus Cansumys Tscherskia Hamsters are rodents belonging to the subfamily Cricetinae. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ...


It has been speculated that Snowball is a direct allusion to George Orwell's character in Animal Farm. This speculation is supported by Brain's juxtaposition to Napoleon Bonaparte, whose namesake is Snowball's rival in the novel. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des...


While Brain's wish to rule the world is more or less benign (he seems to think he can run the world better than it currently is), Snowball's desire to rule the world is dangerous and if he were to gain long-lasting dominion over the planet, he would probably destroy it. When Brain derailed Snowball's attempt to take over the world via the Microsponge plan, Brain actually considered this "saving" the world.


Snowball is also truly notable in that he is the only Warner Bros. cartoon character to be permanently "killed off" onscreen; during the series finale "Brainwashed", he accidentally runs through the mutation machine, causing him to lose his own intelligence and ending up as a normal hamster.[8]


Snowball was voiced by the late Roddy McDowall. Roderick Andrew Anthony Jude McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998) was an English/American actor. ...


Other notable characters

Billie Mouse
Billie
A female mouse who seems to have the traits of Pinky, yet is actually very intelligent, introduced in "The World Can Wait".[10] Both Brain and Snowball are in love with her because of her intellect (Brain actually loved her before she became intelligent); however, she has a crush on Pinky because she likes his easygoing personality. She ponders why Pinky remains loyal to Brain and tries to separate Pinky from him. While Billie's shrill voice and manner of speech was thought to be a play on the Susan Alexander character from Citizen Kane as a complement to Brain's Orson Welles-like portrayal, Billie is actually a reference to the character of the same name from the film and stage play Born Yesterday as played in both by Judy Holliday. The character is a dimwit who falls for her brainy tutor played by William Holden. Although initially stupid like Pinky, after experiments she became even smarter than the Brain. He gives up trying to date her so he can conquer the world before she beats him to it. In the episode "You'll Never Eat Food Pellets in this Town Again", her name is revealed to be Sheila. Voiced by Tress MacNeille.
Pharfignewton
A mare version of Pinky introduced in "Jockey for Position".[15] Pharfignewton is a race horse with a long losing record and is the underdog at the track. When Brain races as a jockey to raise money for one of his plans, he decides to ride the top-rated horse in the race after getting rid of its jockey. However, Pinky chooses Pharfignewton as the racing horse of choice, much to Brain's annoyance. Nevertheless, after being motivated to rescue Pinky from being trampled after falling on to the track, Pharfignewton wins the race. Pharfignewton's name is a pun on "Fahrvergnügen", Volkswagen's marketing slogan of the 1980s, as well as a reference to the racehorse Phar Lap, and the well-known US cookies Fig Newtons. She made two cameos in the Animaniacs movie Wakko's Wish, during which Dr. Scratchansniff referred to her as "Pharfignewton horsie girl."
Larry, Brain, and Pinky try to get out of a Three Stooges-type situation
Larry
A white laboratory mouse featured in the episode "Pinky and the Brain…And Larry",[18] and makes a cameo in "The Pinky and the Brain Reunion Special".[19] He is an obvious parody of Larry, one of the Three Stooges — they share similar hair styles, and like his human counterpart, he acts as a middle man between the Brain's intellect and Pinky's stupidity. There's also an original theme song for the group which has Larry's name hastily spliced into key parts of the show's normal theme — for example, "They're Pinky and The Brain (and Larry), yes Pinky and The Brain (and Larry), one is a genius, the other's insane (and the other one's Larry)", with Larry singing the added portions. The recurring theme of the episode is the acknowledgment (or lack thereof) of Larry's existence, just like in real life, where Larry is deemed the most underrated of the Three Stooges. Absolutely no explanation is given for Larry's presence — Pinky and the Brain act as if he has always been there, even though the viewer has never seen him before (and will never see him again), which could be another reason why his existence is constantly being pointed out. His lines consisted solely of greetings and reminders that he is a part of the episode. At the end of the episode, when the Brain realises that they don't actually need Larry, Larry decides to change his name to Art (a reference to Art Garfunkel, whose hair is similar to that of the Three Stooge's Larry) and start a new career as a folk singer, singing "The Smells of Loudness" (a parody of The Sounds of Silence) with Paul Simon. Just as the Brain declares that he and Pinky will continue to attempt to rule the world without Larry, they are almost immediately joined by a mouse named Zeppo (a parody of Zeppo of the Marx Brothers), and the episode's closing song splices in Zeppo's name like it did with Larry in the opening theme. Larry is never seen onscreen after that beyond one cameo appearance. Larry's appearance seems to parody adding new characters to an already established cast. It also foreshadows Elmyra seemingly being forced into the show in the final season. Voiced by Billy West.
Roman Numeral One (Romy)
Brain attempted to clone himself in the episode "Brinky"[20] to create an army of Brains to take over the world. However, an errant toenail clipping from Pinky got into the machine’s tissue sample. As such, the resulting mouse ended up as a mix of both Brain's and Pinky's traits; he possessed Brain's somewhat large head and a good portion of his intellect, but he also had Pinky's teeth and propensity to utter "Narf" and "Poit". Effectively the offspring of both mice, Brain calls him "Roman Numeral One" (implying that more clones were to follow), which Pinky shorts to "Romy" (pronounced ROH-mee). (Later in the episode, Brain occasionally refers to him simply as Roman.) While Brain continues to try to groom Romy to assist him in taking over the world, Pinky overly mothers him in Pinky's own ways (including following the advice of Dr. Spock and reading to him from Pat the Bunny); the "parenting" conflict causes Romy to run away to become a ventriloquist and "to follow the Grateful Dead" for a year. In that episode, Romy also gets a human girlfriend named Bunny, possibly due to subliminal influence of Pinky's reading choice of "Pat the Bunny". Voiced by both Maurice LaMarche (baby Romy) and Rob Paulsen (teenaged Romy).
Brain's Parents
In The Visit,[21] Brain's parents are average non-anthropomorphic white field mice in the wild; when Brain realizes that he has found his parents through DNA testing during part of a plan, he creates a special wearable intelligence device called the Pensamplivex (Pensa is Latin for "thoughts" Ampli is "to make loud", and Vex means "voice".) He then places it on his parents, and they become anthropomorphic and gives them the ability to communicate. They turn out to have somewhat Midwestern accents and are highly critical of Brain's position and lack of success in life, though they dote on Pinky and his friendship with Brain. Voiced by Ernest Borgnine and Tress MacNeille.
Pinky's Family
In The Family That Poits Together, Narfs Together,[22] Pinky and Brain find and bring Pinky's family (Pinky's mother, father and "sister" – his sister is in actuality an empty spool of thread) back to Acme Labs in accordance with Pinky's wishes to meet his family, and so that Brain can use their reunion on national television to secure funding for his latest plan. Using the same device that gave himself and Pinky their intelligence, Brain sends Pinky's parents through the machine. Pinky's parents turn out to have a heavy English accent, and generally share the same wit and nonsensical humor that Pinky does. Surprisingly (or not) to Brain, Pinky and his parents all seem to be able to communicate with Pinky's "sister", though the spool does not ever move or act on its own. Both voiced by Eric Idle.
Precious
A genetically enhanced cat. In the three-part Episode "Brainwashed" she tries to take over the world, a move that Brain initially mistakes as the work of Snowball.[8] Voiced by Nora Dunn.
Bobby Bob Yokel
A character who appeared in the three-part episode "Brainwashed". He along with Pinky was one of the few people not to be affected by a song dumbing down the world, a parody of the Macarena.[8] Voiced by Townsend Coleman.
Mr. Sultana Sultana
Mr. Suntana is neighbor to Acme Labs, and is a packrat and a loner. In order to obtain a package for himself but left at Mr. Sultana's house, Brain is forced to dress Pinky and himself up as a married couple, with Pinky as the housewife. From that point, Mr. Sultana seems to have a small crush on Pinky in his housewife costume.[23] Voiced by Paul Rugg.
Maurice
is a carrot brought to life by the Brain in a Frankenstein style experiment. He was named by Pinky. The Brain wished him to be a soldier to help him take over the world, however he instead he took after Pinky. He went with Pinky and the Brain while they went to start a farm to grow an army of giant vegetables (Called Brain Acres). The person who owned the farm next to Brain Acres realized that Brain's vegetables would beat his at the county fair, so he stole the Brain's vegetables. As a counterstrike the Brain used the same experiment that brought Maurice to life to bring the stolen vegetables to life. Unfortunately the controller the Brain was using to control the vegetables was damaged and the vegetables went on a rampage. However, the heat started to make the vegetables wilt, including the Maurice. The Brain realizes that the only way to save Maurice was to plant him in the soil and such he does. He was voiced by Frank Welker
The Devil
appeared in A Pinky and The Brain Halloween. He tried to convince the Brain to sell his soul in exchange for world domination. The Brain refused as doing this would prove that he was a failure in taking over the world with out super-natural assistance. However, Pinky sold his soul to the Devil in order to allow his best friend to get what he has always wanted, and The Brain was made king of the world. Pinky was taken down to Hades where he was to be tortured for all eternity. At first the Brain accepted this, however eventually he started to miss Pinky though he would not admit it to anyone else. Instead he told everyone that he just wanted to ask Pinky were he kept the food pellets. Snowball gives the Brain a map to Hades (directly under a department of motor vehicles building). While Brain makes his trek to Hades, Snowball steals his position as king of the Earth. In the end the Brain challenges the devil to a challenge of rhythmic gymnastics. In the end the Devil cheats and justifies it to the Brain by saying that no where in the contract did it say that it had to be a "fair" competition. However, Pinky comes across a loophole accidentally in the original contract in which he sold his soul. Pinky asked in his contract that he was to have a device for all eternity which the devil did not have knowledge of (due to the fact that Pinky most likely made it up or at least came up with his own name for it) so the devil could not provide it thus voiding the contract. This made the Devil angry and he changed into his beast like form, and stared to chase the Pinky and the Brain. However, the two mice managed to escape to the surface. Since the contract that gave the Brain the world was voided, Snowballs power which he stole from the Brain was also voided. In the end the Brain promises to attempt to take over the world tomorrow night, without super-natural assistance.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... For the 1950 film version, see Born Yesterday (1950 film) For the 1993 remake, see Born Yesterday (1993 film) Born Yesterday is a play written and first directed by Garson Kanin and adapted into a successful 1950 film. ... Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921–June 7, 1965) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... William Holden (April 17, 1918 – ca. ... Tress MacNeille (born June 20, 1951) is an American voice actress best known for providing various voices on the animated television shows The Simpsons, Futurama, and Animaniacs. ... 13 year old Peruvian Paso mare A broodmare and foal In English, a mare (an old Germanic word) is a female horse; the word is also an etymological root of marshal (originally marescalcus horse servant). Mares are considered easier to handle than males, which are called stallions or after castration... Fahrvergnügen was a slogan, translating as driving enjoyment (from fahren, to drive, plus Vergnügen, enjoyment), used by Volkswagen in an ad campaign (c. ... Volkswagen AG (ISIN: DE0007664005), or VW, is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany. ... For the computer software, see: Phar Lap (company). ... A plastic tray of Fig Newtons The Fig Newton is a brand of fig bar (in Europe, fig roll), a soft, cake-like pastry filled with fig jam. ... Wakkos Wish is a 1999 direct-to-video animated film based on the Warner Bros. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Larry Fine (October 5, 1902 – January 24, 1975) was an American comedian and actor, who is best-known as a member of the comedy act The Three Stooges. ... The Three Stooges were an American vaudeville and comedy act of the mid 20th century best known for their numerous short subject films. ... Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing (1980) Arthur Ira Garfunkel (born November 5, 1941) is an American white gollywog and actor, best known as half of the folk duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... Sounds of Silence is an album by Simon and Garfunkel released January 17, 1966. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... Herbert Marx (February 25, 1901 – November 29, 1979) is best known as Zeppo Marx, the name he used when he performed with his brothers, The Marx Brothers. ... See Marx brothers (fencing) for the 16th century German brotherhood. ... For the silent film-era actor, see Billy West (silent film actor). ... Dr. Spock (l) with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Pat the Bunny is a touch and feel book for small children and babies that has been a perennial best-seller in the U.S. since published in 1940. ... Ventriloquism is an act of deception in which a person (ventriloquist) manipulates his or her voice so that it appears that the voice is coming from elsewhere. ... Ernest Borgnine (born Ermes Effron Borgnino in Hamden, Connecticut on January 24, 1917[1][2] ) is a Golden Globe, BAFTA and Academy Award winning American actor. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is an English comedian, actor, author and composer of comedic songs. ... Dunn at the Laws of Attraction priemere. ... Macarena may mean: Macarena. ... Townsend Coleman (born May 1954) is an American voice actor. ... Paul Rugg is an American voice over actor, primarily in the animated field. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... This article is about a military rank. ... For other uses of the word fair see Fair (disambiguation) Fair is the name for the gathering together of people to display or trade produce or other goods, to parade or display animals and often to enjoy associated carnival or fairground entertainment. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... In the United States of America, Department of Motor Vehicles (or DMV) is a commonly used name of the government agency of a U.S. state which administers the registration of automobiles (e. ... Rhythmic gymnasts from Greece in the 2000 Sydney Olympics Rhythmic gymnastics is a sport in which single competitors or pairs, trios or even more manipulate one or two apparatuses: Ball, Clubs, Hoop, Ribbon, and Rope. ...

Creation and inspiration

Caricatures of Minton (left) and Fitzgerald from "The Pinky and the Brain Reunion Special"
Caricatures of Minton (left) and Fitzgerald from "The Pinky and the Brain Reunion Special"

The inspiration for Pinky and the Brain are based on the unique personalities of two of producer Tom Reugger's Tiny Toon Adventures colleagues, Eddie Fitzgerald and Tom Minton, respectively.[24] Ruegger thought of the premise of Pinky and the Brain when he wondered what would happen if Minton and Fitzgerald tried to take over the world. Fitzgerald (who has also worked on Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures and Ren and Stimpy) is said to have constantly said "Narf" and "Egad" around the Tiny Toons production office.[24] Series producer Peter Hastings described Eddie by saying, "He always greeted you like you were wearing a funny hat – and he liked it."[25] The Fitzgerald/Minton connection to Pinky and the Brain is parodied further in the episode "The Pinky and the Brain Reunion Special"[19] in which two cartoon writers within the short that write for Pinky and the Brain are caricatures of Fitzgerald and Minton, and which themselves they reflect in the Pinky and the Brain cartoons that they write.[26] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ren and Stimpy are the eponymous characters of two cartoon television series created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi. ...


While Ruegger initially based The Brain after Minton, the Welles connection came from LaMarche, who is a big fan of the actor/director, and had supplied the voice for Orsen Welles in the 1994 movie Ed Wood. LaMarche describes Brain's voice as "65% Orson Welles, 35% Vincent Price".[27] Brain's similarity to Orson Welles was made explicit in the Animaniacs episode Yes, Always, which was based upon an outtake from one of Welles' television commercials, colloquially known as Frozen Peas, in which he ranted about the poor quality of the script. This cartoon was described by writer Peter Hastings as "a $250,000 inside joke": LaMarche used excerpts from it as sound check material, and Hastings took it to its logical conclusion.[28] Strengthening the Welles connection was an episode in which Brain took on the mind-clouding powers of a radio character called "The Fog": a parody of The Shadow, a popular radio character for which Welles once provided the voice.[29] Other episodes alluding to Welles included an episode entitled "The Third Mouse", a parody of The Third Man in which the Brain played the part of Welles' character Harry Lime (with Pinky as Holly Martins),[30] and an episode, "Battle for the Planet", in which Brain, inspired by Welles' infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast and the hysteria it provoked, stages an alien invasion on television, believing that this will cause humanity to erupt in mass panic, allowing him to seize power. A caricature of Orson Welles even appears in a late episode of the series ("What Ever Happened to Baby Brain"), echoing a rant of the Brain's and introducing himself afterwards.[31] Ed Wood is a biopic directed by Tim Burton, starring Johnny Depp as the cross-dressing cult movie maker Edward D. Wood, Jr. ... Vincent Leonard Price Jr. ... An outtake can be a take or scene, as of a movie, or a television program, that is filmed but not used in the final cut, usually for pacing reasons. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ... Frozen Peas is the colloquial term for a blooper audio clip wherein American filmmaker Orson Welles performs narration for a series of British television advertisements for Findus. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... The Third Man (1949) is a British film noir directed by Carol Reed. ... For other uses, see The War of the Worlds (disambiguation). ...


The episode "Win Big"[6] was the very first Pinky and the Brain segment. The story was by Tom Ruegger, the script was by Peter Hastings, and it was developed for the Animaniacs series. According to Ruegger, most of the elements that would become synonymous with Pinky and the Brain can be found in that original story. "Win Big" contained many dialog bits that became conventions of the entire series,[24] including "Are you pondering what I'm pondering", Pinky saying "Oh wait…but no…" in response to a plan, and ending every story with "What are we doing tomorrow night? (etc.)" among others.


Production

Producers

As with Animaniacs, Steven Spielberg was the executive producer during the entire run, Tom Ruegger was the senior producer, Jean MacCurdy was the executive in charge of production, and Andrea Romano was the voice director.


Writing

The original Pinky and the Brain shorts on Animaniacs were written primarily by Tom Reugger and Peter Hastings. Upon moving into its own show, the writing staff included Gordon Bressack, Charles M. Howell IV, Earl Kress, Wendell Morris, and Tom Sheppard.


Voicing

Rob Paulsen and Maurice LaMarche together at the 34th Annual Annie Awards red carpet.
Rob Paulsen and Maurice LaMarche together at the 34th Annual Annie Awards red carpet.

Pinky and the Brain were voiced by Rob Paulsen and Maurice LaMarche, respectively. The series also used the work of many of the same voice actors for Animaniacs including Tress MacNeille, Jess Harnell, Frank Welker, and Jeff Bennett, as well as Paul Rugg, Billy West, and Jim Cummings. Celebrities such as Roddy McDowell, Nora Dunn, Townsend Coleman, Ernest Borgnine, Eric Idle, Dick Clark, Ed McMahon, Steve Allen, Joyce Brothers, Gavin MacLeod, John Tesh, Michael McKean, Garry Marshall, Mark Hamill, and James Belushi have all performed guest voice work for the series as well.[32] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (518x774, 96 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pinky and the Brain 34th Annual Annie Awards Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (518x774, 96 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pinky and the Brain 34th Annual Annie Awards Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Wikinews has news related to: Cars big winner as 34th Annual Annie Awards handed out Cars director John Lasseter on the red carpet at the 34th Annual Annie Awards. ... Jess Q. Harnell (born December 23, 1963 in Teaneck, New Jersey, USA), is an American voice actor, best known for portraying Wakko Warner and Walter Wolf on Animaniacs. ... Franklin W. Welker (born March 12, 1946) is an American voice actor. ... Jeffrey Glenn Bennett (born October 2, 1962) is a well-known voice actor in cartoons, movies and games. ... For the silent film-era actor, see Billy West (silent film actor). ... James Jonah Jim Cummings (born November 3, 1952[1] in Youngstown, Ohio) is an American voice actor who is best known for his work on the Winnie the Pooh animated series. ... Roderick Andrew Anthony Jude McDowall (September 17, 1928–October 3, 1998) was a British actor. ... For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ... Edward Ed Peter Leo McMahon, Jr. ... Steve Allen on the cover of Steve Allen on the Bible, Religion, and Morality Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian, and writer who was instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... Joyce Brothers Joyce Brothers, PhD (maiden name Joyce Diane Bauer, born October 20, 1928) is a psychologist and advice columnist, publishing a daily syndicated newspaper column since 1960. ... Gavin MacLeod (born February 28, 1930) is an American actor, notable for playing Murray Slaughter on The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Captain Merrill Stubing on The Love Boat. ... John Frank Tesh (born July 9, 1952) is an American pianist and composer of new age and contemporary Christian music. ... Michael McKean (born October 17, 1947) is an American actor, comedian, composer and musician, best known for his portrayal of Leonard Lenny Kosnowski on the sitcom Laverne and Shirley; as one of the members of Spinal Tap; as a Saturday Night Live cast member; and for other various appearances in... Garry Kent Marshall (born November 13, 1934) is an American actor/director/writer/producer. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor. ... James Edgar Belushi (born June 15, 1954) is an American actor, comedian, musician and younger brother of the late comedian John Belushi. ...


Cree Summer reprised her role as Elymra during Pinky, Elmyra, and The Brain. Cree Summer Francks (born July 7, 1969 in Los Angeles, California), best known as Cree Summer, is an American-born actress, musician, and Emmy Award-nominated voice actress. ...


Animation

Like Animaniacs, most of the original Pinky and the Brain shorts used a variety of animation studios, including Tokyo Movie Shinsha, StarToons, Wang Film Productions, Freelance Animators New Zealand, and AKOM. However, the bulk of the episodes created outside of Animanaics (seasons 2 and beyond) were produced by Rough Draft Studios and Wang Film Productions. TMS logo (circa 1987) TMS Entertainment Limited ), formerly known as Tokyo Movie Shinsha ) (TYO: 3585 , a subsidiary of Sega Sammy), is a veteran animation studio located in Japan. ... StarToons was an American animation studio located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Wang Film Productions is one of the oldest and most prolific animation studios. ... Freelance Animators, New Zealand is an animation studio located in New Zealand, like the name implies. ... AKOM is a South Korean animation studio that has provided much work since its conception in 1985 by Nelson Shin. ... Rough Draft Studios, Inc. ...


Hallmarks

Humor

See also: Hallmarks of Animaniacs

Like Animaniacs, much of the humor in Pinky and the Brain was aimed at both adult and younger audiences. Parodies of pop culture icons were quite common on the series, more so during the original episodes developed for the WB prime time slot. Notably, these episodes included political figures such as then-President Bill Clinton and his wife Hillary and other world leaders at the time, and actors such as Christopher Walken. This article is about the television series. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...


Some episodes including more complete parodies similar to those in Animaniacs. The episode "The Megalomaniacal Adventures of Brainie the Poo" parodies Winnie The Pooh. "Cameos" include Jagger instead of Tigger and Al Gore instead of Eeyore. Al Gore is "full of hot air", floating like a balloon. Other parodic elements include Christopher Walken in place of Christopher Robin and the "Brainie the Poo" book appears to have been authored by "A.A. Meeting."[33] The three-part "Brainwashed" episode included several allusions to The Prisoner television show, though everyone in The Village was identified by the hat they wore, and not by number.[34][35] Pooh redirects here. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Tigger is a fictional tiger character originally introduced in A. A. Milnes book, The House at Pooh Corner. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... The original stuffed toys owned by Christopher Robin Milne and featured in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Christopher Robin is a character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. ... For other uses, see The Prisoner (disambiguation) and Prisoner. ...


Another similarity with Animaniacs was the presence of a gag credit in the closing credits; specifically, each show featured an uncommon English word, typically appropriate for the theme or some aspect of the episode, along with its definition. For example, "Around the World in 80 Narfs", where the mice are foiled by trying to speak "cabbie" and end up going in circles, the gag credit word was "anophelosis" defined as "morbid state due to extreme frustration."[36] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


"One is a genius, the other's insane"

"One is a genius, the other's insane"

The show's theme song informs the viewer that "One is a genius, the other's insane" Taken at face value, the Brain is the one supposed to be a genius, and Pinky is the one supposed to be insane. Pinky's unpredictable and startling insight as a foil to Brain's rather more plodding and stubborn approach to "taking over the world" has led more than one fan[37] to suggest that Pinky is, in fact, the real genius rather than Brain. Peter Hastings has stated that "Pinky IS smarter, he just shows it in a different way."[24] Other elements suggesting Pinky's mental superiority can be noticed throughout all episodes. Watching the cartoon through this perspective makes the viewer aware of human behavior that isn't logical. One example is figures of speech, which the Brain uses to give Pinky commands. Pinky carries out actions based on the literal meaning of the commands. Sometimes this is used to make a point about real life, such as "Inherit the Wheeze" in which Pinky thinks "Nick O'Teen" is a person, and thinks he must be "Really clever if he can convince people to suck burning stinky leaf-gas down their throats."[38] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Much of the episode "Pinky's Turn"[39] centers around Pinky. Pinky took on some of Brain's motivation for taking over the world, and became extremely successful at ruling at least a town, but of course the whole thing was put through the wringer of Pinky's 'clockwork orange' view of things; hence Pinky's choice of naming the town: "I think I'll call it 'Shiny Pants', because everyone in there will want to wear shiny pants…" He goes on to describe his ultimate goal and the path to getting there. Seeing Pinky's unexpected success, Brain is heard to wonder questions similar to many that may have been asked for centuries: "Why do people with such capacity for power seem to waste it on crazy things that work out somehow, but shouldn't?" A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian 1962 novel by the Mancunian writer Anthony Burgess, adapted as a film by Stanley Kubrick in 1971. ...


In one episode,[40] Pinky addressed a group of world leaders, lauding Brain's talents and intelligence, and convincing them to give Brain control of their countries. Brain, who was very upset at the time, repulsed the leaders with his anger and rudeness, leading them to take back their offer. A mortified Brain later realized that Pinky had delivered the world to him on a silver platter, and he himself ruined the deal. The supreme irony is that the seemingly stupid Pinky nearly took over the world using honest and open discussion and talk, as opposed to the overly complicated and Machiavellian strategies Brain himself typically uses, while Brain himself prevented the conquest from taking place. Pinky has a great heart, and he always tries to agree with Brain, until he's placed in a situation where he has power, and realizes that Brain's plans are morally wrong. At these times, Brain is usually left in danger, with Pinky coming to his rescue at the expense of his power. In "The Pink Candidate", Pinky ends up as the President of the United States with only minor help from Brain, and gives up his position of power to save Brain from being "stoned" by the Senators.[41] Ironic redirects here. ... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ... This article is about the use of the moral in storytelling. ...


Brain often asks Pinky about popular culture and famous people when needed; for example, when a basketball player was receiving attention, Brain asks why, which ultimately leads to his using basketball to attempt to take over the world. The reason for Pinky's knowing so much about popular culture is because he, according to Brain, "watch[es] too much TV," while Brain himself is usually too preoccupied with his plans of world domination to do so.[42] Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... This article is about the sport. ...


In an episode surrounding the origin of their receiving their intelligence, it is revealed that it was actually Pinky's idea for Brain to attempt to take over the world, after Brain's first-ever plan (viz: trying to show his intelligence in order to receive a high position within the lab where they were genetically modified) fails.[7]


"Are you pondering…?"

Sometimes referred to by the acronym "AYPWIP", the following exchange occurs in all but one episode:

Brain: Pinky, are you pondering what I'm pondering?
Pinky: I think so, Brain, but...

The ellipsis is filled in each time with a unique non-sequitur such as, "we're already naked," "isn't a cucumber that small called a gherkin?" or "but if they called them sad meals kids wouldn't buy them." The result is always utterly nonsensical in the context given, indicating that Pinky was in no way pondering what Brain was pondering (or that Pinky does not know what the word ponder means). Often this resulted in a quip from Brain, like 'the fact that your mind is not clouded by medication only fills me with pity.' In "The Pinky POV",[16] the viewer sees from Pinky's perspective and witnesses his train of thought as Brain speaks to him. The picture begins as Brain and his speech, but the dialogue fades out and the picture morphs into a whimsical fantasy. When Brain asks Pinky the usual question, Pinky responds with a query regarding the last thing he saw. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the fruit. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Cucumis anguria. ... Happy Meal logo, English Happy Meal logo, Japanese. ...


In the episode "Napoleon Brainaparte",[13] Pinky's non-sequitur actually refers to an exchange earlier in the episode. As Pinky and Brain are riding through the streets of Paris they pass the Louvre, and Pinky remarks that they should build a giant glass pyramid in the courtyard, to which Brain sarcastically replies "Yes, and then they'll send the London Bridge to America." Later, when Brain asks Pinky "Are you pondering what I'm pondering?" Pinky replies "I think so Brain, but then you'd have to take that whole bridge apart, wouldn't you?" This is an example of meta-humor, in that both of these events have in reality occurred. The old London Bridge is currently in Lake Havasu City, Arizona. This article is about the museum. ... The large glass pyramid of le musée du Louvre The Louvre Pyramid is a large metal and glass pyramid which serves as the main entrance to the Musée du Louvre and has become a landmark for the city of Paris. ... For other uses, see London Bridge (disambiguation). ... Lake Havasu City is a city in Mohave County, Arizona, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 41,938. ...


In one rare instance, Brain's ponderance ("We shall disguise ourselves as a cow!") was exactly what Pinky was pondering, except Pinky ironically thought the ponderance too stupid to voice.[36]


In the episode "Brain Food", Pinky finally admits that he almost never is pondering what Brain is pondering, causing Brain to ponder that exact same thing. [43]


Another rare instance occurred in the episode "That Smarts", in which Brain uses a device to increase Pinky's intelligence. Brain asks Pinky, "Are you pondering what I'm pondering?" and Pinky, now being a genius, responds, "Yes, I am."[44]


On the extremely rare occasion, Pinky has asked Brain the question. In "Welcome to the Jungle", Pinky, taking control after Brain realizes he is unable to be rational in nature, once asked Brain as they found a box on a riverbank "Are you pondering what I'm pondering?", to which Brain replied, confusedly "We eat the box?", which turned out to be partially what he was pondering. ["No, we build a boat! And then we eat the box!"] Also, in Pinky's Plan, Pinky jokingly asked Brain the question when Pinky got the idea of getting Brain world leadership for his birthday. However, Pinky quickly denied saying it, causing Brain to think he was hearing things.


There are only two exceptions to the use of "Are you pondering…". In the episode "Pavlov's Mice", Brain uses "thinking" in place of "pondering".[3] In the movie Wakko's Wish, which included Pinky and the Brain, there is an extra word: "Pinky, are you pondering exactly what I'm pondering?" to fit the rythm of the song that was going on at that time in the movie. Wakkos Wish is a 1999 direct-to-video animated film based on the Warner Bros. ...


Response

Popularity

The creation of the Pinky and the Brain series was a result of the popularity of the characters from Animaniacs. The show continued attracting many of the same fans as Animaniacs along with the rise of the availability of the Internet. Maurice LaMarche and Rob Paulsen appeared on voice actor tours around the Warner Bros. Studio Stores.


In an interview on the 3rd DVD volume, LaMarche and Paulsen noted that Roy Langbord (vice-president of Showtime), Al Franken, and Barenaked Ladies are fans of the shows.[45] This article is about the pay TV channel. ... Alan Stuart Al Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an Emmy Award–winning American comedian, actor, author, screenwriter, political commentator, radio host and, recently, politician. ... Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ...


Nominations and awards

Pinky and the Brain has won several Emmy and Annie Awards.[46] In 1996, the series won a Primetime Emmy Award for "Outstanding Animated Program" for the episode "A Pinky and the Brain Christmas".[9] Rob Paulsen won the Annie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement for "Voice Acting by a Male Performer in an Animated Television Program Production in 1996 and 1997, while Maurice LaMarche won the same in 1998. Paulsen also won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program for his role as Pinky subsequently in 1999. The series itself won the 1999 Daytime Emmy for "Outstanding Special Class Animated Program". An Emmy Award. ... The Annie Awards are given to an animation award show created by the International Animated Film Society ASIFA-Hollywood, and are animations highest honor[1]. Originally designed to celebrate lifetime or career contributions to animation in the fields of producing, directing, animation, design, writing, voice acting, sound and sound...


The episode "Inherit the Wheeze",[38] in which Brain was subject to the effects of smoking by a tobacco company, won a PRISM Award for its anti-smoking message.[47] The Entertainment Industries Council is a non-profit organization founded in 1983 that promotes the depiction of health and social issues in film, television, music, and comic books. ...


Allusions in other media

The phrase "The same thing we do every night, Pinky," was spoofed in one episode of The New Batman Superman Adventures by Batgirl/Barabra Gordon while talking to Bruce Wayne/Batman.


The Rice University Neologism dictionary[48] includes not only "narf" as a random sound or nonce word, but also "narfed" as a verb to mean "to be struck completely" with some embarrassment or folly, much as Pinky would be hit on the head by Brain after his follies ruined Brain's plan. Both words are directly attributed to Pinky and the Brain. The Internalational Dictionary of Neologisms[49] includes the word "narfistic" as "an idea or concept that works fine when you think about it – but is very difficult to express to someone else", as a result of Pinky only saying "Narf!" after Brain elaborates on one of his extensive plans. Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... A neologism is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (or coined), often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... A nonce word is a word used only for the nonce—to meet a need that is not expected to recur. ...


Pinky and the Brain were alluded to in The Incredible Hulk #438 as two white mice, kept by Omnibus. One of the realistically drawn mice had an enlarged cranium, and when their cage was destroyed the sound "narf" is indicated. Omnibus claims that he is being haunted by The Leader, but once the mice have escaped their cage, the "ghost" of the Leader is silenced and Omnibus is robbed of his brilliant schemes for world domination. Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ...


The Virgin New Adventures Doctor Who novel, "Death and Diplomacy" by Dave Stone includes two characters repeating the "Are you pondering…" lines, and near the end, two of the fallen villains in the story recover, one telling his comrade that they must prepare for tomorrow night when they will take over the universe. The Virgin New Adventures (often referred to simply as NAs within fandom) were a series of novels from Virgin Publishing based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which had been cancelled in 1989, continuing the story of the series from where the television programme had left off. ... This article is about the television series. ... Death and Diplomacy is an original novel written by Dave Stone and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Dave Stone is a British writer. ...


There is a heavy metal band in Niagara Falls, New York called thinksobrain.[50] Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In Mystery Science Theater 3000 episode 907, Hobgoblins, Pearl Forrester calls her sidekicks Professor Bobo and Observer "Pinky" and "Brain," respectively. Mystery Science Theater 3000, often abbreviated MST3K, is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... For the legendary creatures, see Hobgoblin. ... Mads Pearl Forrester (Mary Jo Pehl) (center), Observer (aka Brain Guy)) (left), and Professor Bobo (Kevin Wagner Murphy) (right). ... Mads Pearl Forrester (Mary Jo Pehl), Professor Bobo (Kevin Wagner Murphy), and Brain Guy (Bill Corbett). ... Mads (l. ...


History

On Animaniacs and Pinky and the Brain

Pinky and the Brain first appeared as a recurring segment on the animated series Animaniacs, another show produced by Steven Spielberg. On September 14, 1993, Pinky and the Brain premiered on television in the episode Win Big, which aired on the FOX Kids Network. The following is an episode list for the Warner Brothers animated television series Pinky and the Brain, which ran from 1995 to 1998. ... This article is about the television series. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article discusses Fox Kids in United States. ...


On September 9, 1995, Pinky and the Brain were spun off onto their own half-hour series on Kids' WB, with each episode consisting of one or more segments, including some of the segments from Animaniacs. The first season of the show was scheduled in a prime-time slot from September 9, 1995 through May 12, 1996 as part of the new WB Network lineup, and as a result, tended to have more jokes and humor aimed to adults rather than children. However, due to poor ratings, subsequent seasons were moved to Saturday mornings as part of the Kids' WB programming block. is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Kids WB is the Saturday morning cartoon block of The CW Television Networks weekend programming. ... Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The WB Television Network is a television network in the United States, founded as a joint venture between the Warner Bros. ...


On Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain

Around 1997 the overall structure within the WB Network changed, including the placement of Jamie Kellner as head of the Kids WB programming. Along with this came pressure on the writers of the show to back off on the idea of world domination and to include more characters on the show.[51] The episode "Pinky and the Brain and ...Larry"[18] was a response to this pressure.[51] Pinky and the Brain are cartoon characters from the American animated television series Animaniacs. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Jamie Kellner is an American television executive. ...


With increased pressure from the WB network, the series was retooled on September 1, 1998 into Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain, in which Pinky and the Brain were owned by Tiny Toons character Elmyra Duff. The show lasted for 13 episodes, 5 of which were shown whole and 6 of which were chopped into segments and aired as part of The Cat&Birdy Warneroonie PinkyBrainy Big Cartoonie Show. is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Steven Spielberg Presents Tiny Toon Adventures (also known as Tiny Toon Adventures or Tiny Toons) is an American animated television series created and produced as a collaborative effort between Steven Spielberg and Warner Bros. ... Elmyra, full of love, having snared Buster. ... The Cat&Birdy Warneroonie PinkyBrainy Big Cartoonie Show, or The Big Cartoonie Show for short, was a compilation program that aired on Kids WB! in 1999 and 2000. ...


Cancellation and syndication

After Pinky and the Brain and Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain were canceled from the Kids WB, Cartoon Network aired Pinky and the Brain from 1998 to 2000. Nickelodeon then acquired syndication rights to broadcast all 65 episodes of Pinky and the Brain on both Nickelodeon, and later Nicktoons Network, beginning on September 4, 2000.[52][53] While the episodes aired unchanged, Nickelodeon altered the opening sequence, masking various items such as beakers with the orange Nickelodeon logo in the same shape and the Acme Labs sign changing into a Nickelodeon logo (this garnered a lot of negative criticism from fans). During 2003, Pinky and the Brain aired on Boomerang with the theme song unaltered. It continued to air on Boomerang and Nicktoons Network until 2005 when it was taken off both channels. It can now be found on Toon Disney, weeknights at 9:30 Eastern Standard Time. For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... This article is about the TV channel. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast television programs to multiple television stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... Nicktoons Network, once known as Nicktoons TV and simply Nicktoons, is a digital cable and satellite television network. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... For Boomerang worldwide, see Boomerang (TV channel). ...


During 2006, Pinky and the Brain, among other shows, was scheduled to be broadcast on the AOL broadband channel, In2TV.[54] However, as of 2007, Pinky and the Brain is no longer a featured series on the site.


In Canada, Pinky and the Brain is currently airing on YTV having started on September 3, 2007. The theme song has been unaltered. is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Merchandise

Pinky and the Brain, along with Animaniacs, aired coincident with the formation of The Warner Bros. Studio Store chain across the United States, and, as a result, numerous t-shirts, coffee mugs, stuffed animals, animation cels, and original artwork from the show were available through these outlets. Other merchandise included comic books, computer games, and video tapes. When Warner Brothers acquired the Hanna-Barbera animation properties in 1998, there was a significant decrease with such merchandise through the store.[55] By the time the series was canceled, very little merchandise was available. The Warner Bros. ... T-Shirt A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt with short or long sleeves, a round neck, put on over the head, without pockets. ... Categories: Toys stubs | Dolls ... See Cel programming language for the programming language A cel, short for celluloid, is a transparent sheet on which objects are drawn or painted for traditional, hand-drawn animation. ... Cartoon Network Studios, formerly known as Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ...


VHS releases

Five VHS collections of Pinky and the Brain episodes were released from 1993 to 1995: A Pinky and the Brain Christmas, Cosmic Attractions, Mice of the Jungle, World Domination Tour, and You Will Buy This Video!, each with approximately 4 episodes that including both Pinky and the Brain shorts from Animaniacs and their own show. These collections are now out of print. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ...


DVD releases

The entire 65 episode run of Pinky and the Brain shows are now available in DVD sets through Warner Home Video. The sets divide the series by 21 or 22 episodes in chronological order instead of following the season breakdown due to the imbalanced size of each season. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

DVD Name Ep # Release Date Additional Information
Volume 1 22 July 25, 2006[56] This four-disk box set includes the first 22 episodes from the series. Contains "Pinky and the Brain: Are You Pondering What I'm Pondering?" — Featurette with Tom Ruegger, Peter Hastings, Rob Paulsen, Maurice LaMarche, Andrea Romano as they discuss why they had so much fun working on the show.
Volume 2 21 December 5, 2006[57] This four-disk box set contains the next 21 episodes from the series. Contains "The Return of World Dominating Extras" – Featurette with Mark Hamill and Wayne Knight as they answer a casting call to do the voices of Pinky and The Brain and get coached by Maurice LaMarche and Rob Paulsen.
Volume 3 22 June 19, 2007[58] This four-disk box set contains the final 22 episodes of the series. Contains the featurette, "It's All About the Fans" – Rob Paulsen (Voice of Pinky) and Maurice LaMarche (Voice of the Brain) pay tribute to their fans.

is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wayne Knight (born August 7, 1955) is an American actor, known for his roles as Newman in the TV sitcom Seinfeld, Dennis Nedry in Jurassic Park, and as police officer Don Orville in the sitcom 3rd Rock from the Sun. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Print

Pinky and the Brain were also regulars in the Animaniacs comic book published by DC Comics. From July 1996 through November 1998, they starred in their own comic book also published by DC Comics, which ran for 27 issues before cancellation. Following the cancellation of the Pinky and the Brain comic, the mice later starred in stories that took up half of the later Animaniacs issues, which, starting at issue #43, was retitled Animaniacs featuring Pinky and the Brain, and ran for other 16 issues before cancellation. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


Pinky and the Brain also had a cameo appearance in the second issue of the Marvel vs. DC miniseries. DC vs Marvel Comics or Marvel Comics vs DC is a 4-issue limited series published by DC Comics and Marvel in 1996. ...


Computer games

There has been one computer game dedicated to Pinky and the Brain, called Pinky and the Brain: World Conquest for the PC, produced by SouthPeak Interactive and distributed by Warner Bros. However, the characters have appeared in several of the Animaniacs games, such as Animaniacs: The Great Edgar Hunt.


Music

The theme music for Pinky and the Brain was composed by Richard Stone with lyrics by Tom Ruegger.[24] The theme during Animaniacs shorts were sung by Yakko, Wakko, and Dot (that is, Rob Paulsen, Jess Harnell, and Tress MacNeille). On the Pinky and the Brain show, the theme gained an additional verse and was sung by unidentified male voices.


While Pinky and the Brain does not feature as many songs as Animaniacs, some of the music from the show can be found across the three Animaniacs CDs. An expanded version of the episode "Bubba Bo Bob Brain" presented in a radio drama or audiobook fashion was released as a CD in 1997 by Rhino Entertainment. As was Animaniacs, Pinky and the Brain was scored primarily by Richard Stone, with assistance from Steve and Julie Bernstein who also orchestrated and sometimes conducted the 40-piece orchestra. The recordings were done on Stage A on the Warner Bros lot, the same stage (and with the same piano) where Carl Stalling recorded his Looney Tunes music. Radio drama is a form of audio storytelling broadcast on radio. ... An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ... Rhino Entertainment Company is an American specialty record label. ...


There have been three notable songs similar to "Yakko's World" in how they play on existing music with new lyrics. "Cheese Roll Call" is sung by Pinky to the march "Semper Fidelis" by John Philip Sousa and praises his love for all cheeses from around the world.[59] "Brainstem" is sung to "Camptown Races" with Brain listing out all the major parts of the human brain, with Pinky jumping in at the chorus to shout "Brainstem! Brainstem!".[60] "A Meticulous Analysis of History" is set to "When I Was a Lad" from Gilbert and Sullivan's H.M.S. Pinafore, and sung by both Brain and Pinky, with Brain reciting the rise to power of famous historical leaders such as Napoleon and Cleopatra, while Pinky mentions how they all fell from power.[61] Yakkos World is a song from the second episode of Animaniacs, sung by Yakko Warner. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era known particularly for American military marches. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Camptown Races, sometimes referred to as Camptown Ladies, is a comic song in broad, stereotyped negro dialect by Stephen Foster (1826 – 1864), known as the father of American music, who was the pre-eminent songwriter in the United States of the 19th century. ... The human brain In animals, the brain (enkephalos) (Greek for in the skull), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behavior. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: H.M.S. Pinafore H.M.S. Pinafore, or The Lass that Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The musical score for Pinky and the Brain will frequently contain veiled musical references — for example, in the episode where the Brain builds a new Papier-mâché Earth, the theme from the 2nd and 4th movements of Dvorak's 'New World Symphony' can be heard throughout the episode.[62] The episode Napoleon Brainaparte makes frequent reference to the French anthem, La Marseillaise,[13] while in the episode in which Pinky becomes the artist "Pinkasso" Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition can be heard.[63] Papier-mâché around a form such as a balloon to create a pig. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák  listen (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of classical music. ... New World Symphony redirects here; for the Miami-based orchestra, see New World Symphony Orchestra. ... This article is about the anthem La Marseillaise. A sculpture popularly called La Marseillaise is part of the sculptural program of the Arc de Triomphe. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ...


See also

The following is an episode list for the Warner Brothers animated television series Pinky and the Brain, which ran from 1995 to 1998. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Spellbound". Animaniacs. 1993-11-10. No. 38, season 1.
  2. ^ "When Mice Ruled The World". Animaniacs. 1993-11-23. No. 47, season 1.
  3. ^ a b "Pavlov's Mice". Animaniacs. 1993-10-06. No. 18, season 1.
  4. ^ a b c d "Snowball". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-01-20. No. 7, season 1.
  5. ^ a b "Brain's Night Out". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-02-21. No. 52, season 3.
  6. ^ a b "Win Big". Animaniacs. 1993-09-14. No. 2, season 1.
  7. ^ a b c d "Project B.R.A.I.N.". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-09-28. No. 59, season 3.
  8. ^ a b c d "Brainwashed: Wash Harder". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-09-16. No. 64, season 4.
  9. ^ a b "A Pinky and the Brain Christmas". Pinky and the Brain. 1995-12-13. No. 8, season 1.
  10. ^ a b "The World Can Wait". Animaniacs. 1993-11-18. No. 44, season 1.
  11. ^ "Leggo My Ego". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-11-07. No. 44, season 3.
  12. ^ "The Mouse of La Mancha". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-02-25. No. 12, season 1.
  13. ^ a b c "Napoleon Brainaparte". Pinky and the Brain. 1995-11-26. No. 7, season 1.
  14. ^ "Brain Noir". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-09-13. No. 30, season 3.
  15. ^ a b "Jockey for Position". Animaniacs. 1995-10-25. No. 27, season 1.
  16. ^ a b "The Pinky POV". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-05-16. No. 56, season 3.
  17. ^ "The Maze". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-01-01. No. 22, season 2.
  18. ^ a b "Pinky and the Brain…and Larry". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-09-13. No. 28, season 3.
  19. ^ a b "The Pinky and the Brain Reunion Special". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-09-21. No. 61, season 3.
  20. ^ "Brinky". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-02-22. No. 23, season 2.
  21. ^ "The Visit". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-05-12. No. 13, season 1.
  22. ^ "The Family That Poits Together, Narfs Together". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-02-21. No. 53, season 3.
  23. ^ "My Feldmans, My Friends". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-09-16. No. 29, season 3.
  24. ^ a b c d e Jeff (1995-04-05). "Peter Hastings' Q&A – P&TB". alt.tv.animaniacs. (Web link). Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  25. ^ Will, Ed (June 11, 1996), "BRAIN POWER: Pinky, genius pal to resume plotting in 1997", The Denver Post
  26. ^ takineko (2006-12-19). The Silver Age of Animation. Retro Junk. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  27. ^ Arseneau, Adam (2006-07-25). Pinky And The Brain: Volume 1. DVD Verdict. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  28. ^ "Yes, Always". Animaniacs. 1994-02-11. No. 52, season 1.
  29. ^ "Pinky and the Fog". Pinky and the Brain. 1995-09-24. No. 4, season 1.
  30. ^ "The Third Mouse". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-05-12. No. 12, season 1.
  31. ^ "Battle For the Planet". Animaniacs. 1993-10-01. No. 15, season 1.
  32. ^ Pinky and the Brain – Full Cast List. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  33. ^ "The Megalomaniacal Adventures of Brainie the Poo". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-02-07. No. 51, season 3.
  34. ^ "Brainwashed: Brain, Brain Go Away". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-09-02. No. 62, season 4.
  35. ^ "Brainwashed: I Am Not a Hat". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-09-10. No. 63, season 4.
  36. ^ a b "Around the World in 80 Narfs". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-02-03. No. 10, season 1.
  37. ^ Don Markstein's Toonpedia: Pinky and the Brain. Retrieved on 2007-06-18.
  38. ^ a b "Inherit the Wheeze". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-02-28. No. 54, season 3.
  39. ^ "Pinky's Turn". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-02-28. No. 57, season 3.
  40. ^ "Pinky's Plan". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-09-17. No. 34, season 3.
  41. ^ "The Pink Candidate". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-11-02. No. 17, season 2.
  42. ^ "Hoop Schemes". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-05-17. No. 26, season 2.
  43. ^ "Brain Food". Pinky and the Brain. 1998-05-16. No. 56, season 3.
  44. ^ "That Smarts". Pinky and the Brain. 1995-09-17. No. 3, season 1.
  45. ^ Maurice LaMarche and Rob Paulsen. "It's All About the Fans" extra on "Pinky and the Brain Volume 3" [DVD].
  46. ^ IMDB - List of Nominations and Awards for Pinky and the Brain. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  47. ^ MIRAMAX, NBC, CBS & ABC AMONG WINNERS OF PRISM Awards Which Champion Accurate Depiction Of Drug Use In Movies & On Tv (1999-03-09). Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  48. ^ Rice University Neologism Dictionary. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  49. ^ International Dictionary of Neologisms. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  50. ^ thinksobrain.com - home page of the band named from Pinky's usual "AYPWIP" response.. Retrieved on 2007-07-04.
  51. ^ a b Platypus Comix article on Pinky, Elmyra, and the Brain. Platypus Comix. Retrieved on 2006-06-16.
  52. ^ John Dempsey (August 30, 2000). Toon web sans synergy: WB sells to Nick: Cartoon Network turns down Spielberg-produced skeins (English). Variety.com. Reed Business Information. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  53. ^ Unknown (August 29, 2000). Nickelodeon Acquires Exclusive Television Rights to Warner Bros. Animation's STEVEN SPIELBERG PRESENTS PINKY & THE BRAIN (English). TimeWarner.com Newsroom. TimeWarner. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  54. ^ AOL to Launch New Video Portal. TimeWarner Newsroom. TimeWarner (2006-07-31). Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  55. ^ Gookie (1999-06-17). "A Sad Day in Warner Bros' History". alt.tv.animaniacs. (Web link). Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  56. ^ Lambert, David (2006-03-29). Pinky and the Brain - Art, Info, and Conformation of Date... The Pinky and the Brain - Vol. 1 Plot Exposed!. TVShowsonDVD.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  57. ^ Lacey, Gord (2006-08-16). Pinky and the Brain - Ponder This: Volume 2. TVShowsonDVD.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  58. ^ Lacey, Gord (2007-02-28). Pinky and the Brain - Ponder the end of Pinky and the Brain on DVD: The final release hits DVD on June 19. TVShowsonDVD.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  59. ^ "Cheese Roll Call". Pinky and the Brain. 1995-10-01. No. 4, season 1.
  60. ^ "Brainstem". Pinky and the Brain. 1995-09-17. No. 3, season 1.
  61. ^ "A Meticulous Analysis of History". Pinky and the Brain. 1997-09-20. No. 31, season 3.
  62. ^ "It's Only a Paper World". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-09-07. No. 14, season 2.
  63. ^ "Pinkasso". Pinky and the Brain. 1996-09-14. No. 15, season 2.

This article is about the television series. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television series. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television series. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television series. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television series. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television series. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television series. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Pinky and the Brain TV Show - Pinky and the Brain Television Show - TV.com (642 words)
Pinky and the Brain are two genetically engineered lab mice living at Acme Labs.
Pinky and the Brain first appeared as supporting characters on Animaniacs, then becoming popular enough to get their own series.
Pinky and Brain are 2 lab rats in the acme labs that try to concoct super funny schemes to take over the world with Brain being the genious and Pinky being slightly insanely silly, Well let's just leave it at that a perfect formula!
Pinky and the Brain - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia (0 words)
Pinky and the Brain are body parts that starred in their eponymous television show, which ran on the Nickelodeon network from 1992 through 2003.
Pinky and the Brain are aptly named body parts; Pinky is the smallest digit from the left hand of an adult male Caucasian, and the Brain is the genetically-enhanced organ from a 12-year-old girl.
Pinky is an adorable, self-sufficient pinky finger, obsessed with keeping a clean cuticle, proud of his opposability, and dumb as a doorknob.
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