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Encyclopedia > Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd in 1968 with (L – R): Nick Mason, Syd Barrett, David Gilmour, Roger Waters and Richard Wright
Pink Floyd in 1968 with (L – R): Nick Mason, Syd Barrett, David Gilmour, Roger Waters and Richard Wright
Background information
Origin Cambridge, England
Genre(s) Psychedelic rock, art rock, progressive rock, space rock
Years active 1964–present
(on indefinite hiatus since 1996) (One-off reunion: 2005)
Label(s) Harvest, EMI UK

Capitol, Tower, Columbia US This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Harvest Records was a record label, formed by EMI in 1969 to promote progressive rock music and to compete with Philips Vertigo label and Deccas Deram labels. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label owned by EMI and located in Hollywood, California. ... The Logo Tower Records was a record label from 1964 to 1970. ...

Associated acts Sigma 6
Website www.pinkfloyd.co.uk
Members
David Gilmour
Rick Wright
Nick Mason
Former members
Roger Waters
Syd Barrett
Bob Klose

Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. They are known for philosophical lyrics, sonic experimentation, innovative cover art, and elaborate live shows. One of rock music's most successful acts, the group have sold over 200 million albums worldwide[1][2] including 74.5 million albums in the United States alone.[3] For the toyline and animation series, see G.I. Joe: Sigma 6. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Richard Wright, also known as Rick Wright (born July 28, 1945), is the keyboard player of Pink Floyd. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... Rado Bob Klose (born 1944; sometimes referred to as Bob Close or Brian Close in various publications) is a English musician and photographer. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Acoustics is the interdisciplinary sciences that always deals with the study of sound, ultrasound and infrasound (all mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids). ... Example of book cover art. ... Pink Floyd are pioneers in the live music experience, renowned for their lavish stage shows that combine over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. ...


Pink Floyd had moderate mainstream success and were one of the most popular bands in the London underground music scene in the late 1960s as a psychedelic band led by Syd Barrett; however, Barrett's erratic behaviour eventually forced his colleagues to replace him with guitarist and singer David Gilmour. After Barrett's departure, singer and bass player Roger Waters gradually became the dominant and driving force in the group in the late-1970s, until his eventual departure from the group in 1985. The band recorded several albums, achieving worldwide success with The Dark Side of the Moon (1973), Wish You Were Here (1975), Animals (1977), and The Wall (1979). In 1985, Waters declared Pink Floyd "a spent force", but the remaining members, led by Gilmour, continued recording and touring under the name Pink Floyd. Although they were unsuccessfully sued by Waters for rights to the name, they again enjoyed worldwide success with A Momentary Lapse of Reason (1987) and The Division Bell (1994). Eventually they reached a settlement out of court with Waters allowing them use of the name. Waters performed with the band for the first time in 24 years on 2 July 2005 at the London Live 8 concert. Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The main Live 8 concert was held at Hyde Park, London, England on 2 July 2005, in front of over 200,000 people. ...

Contents

Band history

Syd Barrett – led era: 1964–1968

Pink Floyd evolved from an earlier rock band, formed in 1964,[4][5] which was at various times called Sigma 6, the Meggadeaths, The Tea Set (or The T-Set), The Architectural Abdabs, The Abdabs and The Screaming Abdabs. When the band split up, some members — guitarists Rado "Bob" Klose and Roger Waters, drummer Nick Mason, and wind instrument player Rick Wright — formed a new band called "Tea Set". After a brief stint with a lead vocalist named Chris Dennis,[6] blues and folk guitarist and vocalist Syd Barrett joined the band, with Waters moving to bass.[7] For the toyline and animation series, see G.I. Joe: Sigma 6. ... Rado Bob Klose (born 1944; sometimes referred to as Bob Close or Brian Close in various publications) is a English musician and photographer. ... For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. ... Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ...


When Tea Set found themselves on the same bill as another band with the same name, Barrett came up with the alternative name The Pink Floyd Sound, after two blues musicians, Pink Anderson and Floyd Council (two names he'd seen on the notes of a Blind Boy Fuller album).[8][9] For a time after this they oscillated between The Tea Set and The Pink Floyd Sound, with the latter name eventually winning out. The Sound was dropped fairly quickly, but the definite article was still used regularly until 1970. The group's UK releases during the Syd Barrett era credited them as The Pink Floyd as did their first two U.S. singles. 1969's More and Ummagumma albums credit the band as Pink Floyd, produced by The Pink Floyd, while 1970's Atom Heart Mother credits the band as The Pink Floyd, produced by Pink Floyd. David Gilmour is known to have referred to the group as The Pink Floyd as late as 1984.[10] Blues music redirects here. ... Pinkney Pink Anderson (February 12, 1900 — October 12, 1974[1]) was a blues singer and guitarist, born in Laurens, South Carolina (the same town as Rev. ... Floyd Council (September 2, 1911–May 9, 1976) was an American blues musician. ... Blind Boy Fuller (born Fulton Allen) was an American blues guitarist and vocalist. ... For the pop music band, see The The. ...


The heavily jazz-oriented Klose left after recording only a demo,[11] leaving an otherwise stable lineup with Barrett on guitar and lead vocals, Waters on bass guitar and backing vocals, Mason on drums and percussion, and Wright switching to keyboards and backing vocals. Barrett soon started writing his own songs, influenced by American and British psychedelic rock with his own brand of whimsical humour. Pink Floyd became a favourite in the underground movement, playing at such prominent venues as the UFO club, the Marquee Club and the Roundhouse. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A backup vocalist or background singer (or, especially in the U.S., backup singer or sometimes background singer) is a singer who sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other backing vocalists, or alone but not singing the lead. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... UFOria The UFO Club was a famous but shortlived club in London during the 1960s, venue of performances by many of the top bands of the day. ... The Marquee is a legendary music club first located at 165 Oxford Street, London, England when it opened in 1958 with a range of jazz and skiffle acts. ... The Roundhouse was built in 1847 as a turntable engine shed for the London and Birmingham Railway at Chalk Farm (near Camden Town), in London, England. ...


At the end of 1966 the band were invited to contribute music for Peter Whitehead's film Tonite Let's All Make Love In London; they were filmed recording two tracks ("Interstellar Overdrive" and "Nick's Boogie") in January 1967. Although hardly any of this music made it onto the film, the session was eventually released as London '66/'67 in 2005. Peter Lorrimer Whitehead (b. ... Tonite Lets All Make Love in London is a 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the swinging London. It features live perfomance by Pink Floyd and footage of John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsburg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine, and many... Interstellar Overdrive is a psychedelic music composition by Pink Floyd, which appears on their 1967 debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn at almost ten minutes in length. ...


As their popularity increased, the band members formed Blackhill Enterprises in October 1966, a six-way business partnership with their managers, Peter Jenner and Andrew King,[12] issuing the singles "Arnold Layne" in March 1967 and "See Emily Play" in June 1967. "Arnold Layne" reached number 20 in the UK Singles Chart, and "See Emily Play" reached number 6,[13] granting the band its first national TV appearance on Top of the Pops in July 1967. (They had earlier appeared, performing "Interstellar Overdrive" at the UFO Club, in a short documentary, "It's So Far Out It's Straight Down". This was broadcast in March 1967 but seen only in the UK's Granada TV region.). Blackhill Enterprises was a rock music management company, founded as a partnership by the four original members of Pink Floyd, with Peter Jenner and Andrew King. ... Peter Jenner is a British manager of rock bands and acts, and a record producer. ... Arnold Layne was the first single released by British Psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, shortly after landing a recording contract with EMI. The song was written by Syd Barrett, Pink Floyds co-founder and original front man. ... See Emily Play was the third single recorded by British psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, written by original frontman Syd Barrett. ... “British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... Top of the Pops, also known as TOTP, was a long-running British music chart television programme, made and broadcast by the BBC. It was originally shown each week, mostly on BBC One, from 1 January 1964 to 30 July 2006. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Released in August 1967, the band's debut album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, is today considered to be a prime example of British psychedelic music,[14] and was generally well-received by critics at the time. It is now viewed as one of the best debut albums by many critics.[15] The album's tracks, predominantly written by Barrett, showcase poetic lyrics and an eclectic mixture of music, from the avant-garde free-form piece "Interstellar Overdrive" to whimsical songs such as "The Scarecrow", inspired by the Fenlands folk music, a rural region north of Cambridge (Barrett, Gilmour and Waters's home town). Lyrics were entirely surreal and often referred to folklore, such as "The Gnome". The music reflected newer technologies in electronics through its prominent use of stereo panning, tape editing, echo effects (specifically, a Binson Echorec machine) and electric keyboards. The album was a hit in the UK where it peaked at #6, but did not do well in North America, reaching #131 in the U.S.,[16] and that only after it was reissued in the wake of the band's state side commercial breakthrough in the 1970s. During this period, the band toured with Jimi Hendrix, which helped to increase its popularity. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... Interstellar Overdrive is a psychedelic music composition by Pink Floyd, which appears on their 1967 debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn at almost ten minutes in length. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn track listing Chapter 24 (Track 9) The Scarecrow (Track 10) Bike (Track 11) The Scarecrow is a song on Pink Floyds debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967), though it first appeared as the B-side of their second... The Fens may also refer to the Back Bay Fens, a park in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Folk song redirects here. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The Gnome is a song by then psychedelic music, later progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Panning is the spread of a monaural signal in a stereo or multi-channel sound field. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


Barrett's decline

As the band became more popular, the stresses of life on the road, pressure by the record company to produce hit singles, and a significant intake of psychedelic drugs took their toll on Barrett, whose mental health had been deteriorating for several months.[17] In January 1968, guitarist David Gilmour joined the band to carry out Barrett's playing and singing duties, though Gilmour believes that Jeff Beck was considered as well.[18] This entry pertains to the word psychedelic, its origin and uses. ... Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ...


With Barrett's behaviour becoming less and less predictable, and his almost constant use of LSD, he became very unstable, occasionally staring into space while the rest of the band performed. During some performances, he would just strum one chord for the duration of a concert, or randomly begin detuning his guitar.[19] He was also equally erratic in rehearsals; on one occasion he was, according to band members, perfectly on the ball and ready to record while preparing, yet as soon as the recording began he would stare into space. When recording was cut, he became, as Waters describes him, 'the usual jack-the-lad, hopping around on the balls of his feet.' The absent expression in his eyes inspired Waters' lyrics in 1975's "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", "Now there's that look in your eyes/ Like black holes in the sky.' The band's live shows became increasingly ramshackle until, eventually, the other band members simply stopped taking him to the concerts. The last concert featuring Barrett was on 20 January 1968 on Hastings Pier. It was originally hoped that Barrett would write for the band with Gilmour performing live, but Barrett's increasingly difficult compositions, such as "Have You Got It, Yet?", which changed melodies and chord progression with every take, eventually made the rest of the band give up on this arrangement.[20] Once Barrett's departure was formalised in April 1968, producers Jenner and King decided to remain with him, and the six-way Blackhill partnership was dissolved.[20] The band adopted Steve O'Rourke as manager, and he remained with Pink Floyd until his death in 2003.[21] Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Shine On You Crazy Diamond is an epic nine-part Pink Floyd composition with lyrics written by Roger Waters, in tribute to former band member Syd Barrett, and music written by Waters, Richard Wright, and David Gilmour. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ... For architectural piers, see Pier (architecture). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Have You Got It, Yet? is an unreleased and unrecorded song written by Syd Barrett during the short time in which Pink Floyd was a five-piece. ... A chord progression (also chord sequence and harmonic progression or sequence), as its name implies, is a series of chords played in order. ... Steve ORourke, Pink Floyd manager and keen racing driver, sadly passed away in Miami, Florida, USA, in October 2003. ...


After recording two solo albums (The Madcap Laughs and Barrett) in 1970 (co-produced by and sometimes featuring Gilmour, Waters and Wright) to moderate success, Barrett went into seclusion. Again going by his given name, Roger, he eventually moved back to his native Cambridge and lived a quiet life there until his death on 7 July 2006. The Madcap Laughs was Syd Barretts first solo album after being replaced in Pink Floyd by his old school friend David Gilmour. ... Barrett was the second and final studio album of new material released by former Pink Floyd member Syd Barrett. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Finding their feet: 1968–1970

This period was one of musical experimentation for the band. Gilmour, Waters and Wright each contributed material that had its own voice and sound, giving this material less consistency than the Barrett-dominated early years or the more polished, collaborative sound of later years. As Barrett had been the lead singer during his era, Gilmour, Waters and Wright now split both songwriting and lead vocal duties. Waters mostly wrote low-key, jazzy melodies with dominant bass lines and complex, symbolic lyrics, Gilmour focused on guitar-driven blues jams, and Wright preferred melodic psychedelic keyboard-heavy numbers. Unlike Waters, Gilmour and Wright preferred tracks that had simple lyrics or that were purely instrumental. Some of the band's most experimental music is from this period, such as "A Saucerful of Secrets", consisting largely of noises, feedback, percussions, oscillators and tape loops, and "Careful with That Axe, Eugene" (which went by a number of other names as well), a very Waters-driven song with a bass and keyboard-heavy jam culminating in crashing drums and Waters' primal screams. In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A bassline is a series of notes with tones that are low in pitch or frequency. ... For an account of the late 19th-century movement in poetry and the arts, known as Symbolism, see symbolism (arts). ... A jam session is a musical act where musicians gather and play (or jam) without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is a multi-part instrumental by the rock band Pink Floyd from an album of the same name, released in 1968. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Careful With That Axe, Eugene is a Pink Floyd song. ...


Whilst Barrett had written the bulk of the first album, only one composition by him, "Jugband Blues", appeared on the second Floyd album. Barrett also played on the songs "Remember A Day" (recorded during the sessions for Piper) and "Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun". A Saucerful of Secrets was released in June 1968, reaching #9 in the UK and becoming the only Pink Floyd album not to chart in the U.S.[16] Somewhat uneven due to Barrett's departure, the album still contained much of his psychedelic sound combined with the more experimental music that would be fully showcased on Ummagumma. Its centrepiece, the 12-minute title track, hinted at the epic, lengthy songs to come, but the album was poorly received by critics at the time,[15] although critics today tend to be kinder to the album in the context of their body of work.[14] Future Pink Floyd albums would expand upon the idea of long, sprawling compositions, offering more focused songwriting with each subsequent release. Jugband Blues is a song by British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is the second album by rock band Pink Floyd, and arguably one of the first progressive rock albums. ... Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ...


Pink Floyd were then recruited by director Barbet Schroeder to produce a soundtrack for his film, More, which was premièred in May 1969. The music was released as a Floyd album in its own right, Soundtrack from the Film More, in July 1969; the album achieved another #9 finish in the UK, and peaked at #153 in the U.S.[16] Critics tend to find the collection of the film's music patchy and uneven.[14] The band would use this and future soundtrack recording sessions to produce work that may not have fit into the idea of what would appear on a proper Pink Floyd LP; many of the tracks on More (as fans usually call it) were acoustic folk songs. Two of these songs, "Green Is the Colour" and "Cymbaline", became fixtures in the band's live sets for a time and were a part of their live The Man/The Journey suite, as can be heard in the many available bootleg recordings from this period. "Cymbaline" was also the first Pink Floyd song to deal with Roger Waters' cynical attitude toward the music industry explicitly. The rest of the album consisted of avant-garde incidental pieces from the score (some of which were also part of The Man And The Journey) with a few heavier rock songs thrown in, such as "The Nile Song". Barbet Schroeder (born August 26, 1941 in Teheran to a Swiss diplomat father) is a movie director and producer who started his career in French cinema in the 1960s, working together with directors such as Jean-Luc Godard and Jacques Rivette. ... More is a film directed by Barbet Schroder, released in 1969 starring Mimsy Farmer and Klaus Grunberg, dealing with heroin addiction on the island of Ibiza. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Music from the Film More (often referred to simply as More) is Pink Floyds first full-length film soundtrack. ... Cymbaline is a Pink Floyd song from the album More. ... The official program advertising The Man portion of the shows. ... For other uses, see Bootleg. ... Music from the Film More track listing Cirrus Minor (1) The Nile Song (2) Crying Song (3) The Nile Song is the second song from Pink Floyds 1969 album More. ...


The next record, the double album Ummagumma, was a mix of live recordings and unchecked studio experimentation by the band members, with each member recording half a side of a vinyl record as a solo project (Mason's first wife makes an uncredited contribution as a flautist).[22] Though the album was realised as solo outings and a live set, it was originally intended as a purely avant-garde mixture of sounds from "found" instruments. The subsequent difficulties in recording and lack of group organization led to the shelving of the project. The title is Cambridge slang for sexual intercourse[23] and reflects the attitude of the band at the time, as frustrations in the studio followed them throughout these sessions. The band was wildly experimental on the studio disc, which featured Waters' pure folk "Grantchester Meadows", an atonal and jarring piano piece ("Sysyphus"), meandering progressive rock textures ("The Narrow Way") and large percussion solos ("The Grand Vizier's Garden Party"). "Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a Pict" is a five-minute song composed entirely of Roger Water's voice played at varied speeds, resulting in a noise resembling rodents and birds. Large portions of the studio disc were previously played in their live The Man/The Journey concept piece. The live disc featured acclaimed performances of some of their most popular psychedelic-era compositions and caused critics to receive the album more positively than the previous two albums.[14] The album was Pink Floyd's most popular release yet, hitting UK #5 and making the U.S. charts at #74.[16] Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ... A flautist, flutist, or flute player is a musician who plays the flute. ... Grantchester Meadows is a song from the second half of the experimental Pink Floyd album Ummagumma. ... Sysyphus is a four part suite written by progressive rock band Pink Floyds keyboardist Rick Wright. ... The Narrow Way is a section on the studio Vinyl Record of Pink Floyds fourth album Ummagumma. ... The Grand Viziers Garden Party is a three part instrumental of Pink Floyds Ummagumma album. ...


Atom Heart Mother (1970), the band's first recording with an orchestra, was a collaboration with avant-garde composer Ron Geesin. The name was a last minute decision by the band when they were inspired by a newspaper article about a woman who had given birth with a pacemaker. The cover was equally as unplanned, with the photographer claiming to have "gone out into the countryside and taking a picture of the first thing he saw." One side of the album consisted of the title piece, a 23-minute long "rock-orchestral" suite. The second side featured one song from each of the band's then-current vocalists/songwriters (Roger Waters' folk-rock "If", David Gilmour's bluesy "Fat Old Sun" and Rick Wright's nostalgic "Summer '68"). Another lengthy piece, "Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast", was a sound collage of a man cooking and eating breakfast and his thoughts on the matter, linked with instrumentals. The man was Alan Stiles, one of Pink Floyd's roadies at the time. The use of noises, incidental sound effects and voice samples would thereafter be an important part of the band's sound. While Atom Heart Mother was considered a huge step back for the band at the time[24] and is still considered one of its most inaccessible albums,[14] it had the best chart performance for the band up to that time, reaching #1 in the UK and #55 in the U.S.[16] It has since been described by Gilmour as "a load of rubbish" and Waters has said he wouldn't mind if it were "thrown in the dustbin and never listened to by anyone ever again."[25] The album was another transitional piece for the group, hinting at future musical territory such as "Echoes" in its ambitious title track. The popularity of the album allowed Pink Floyd to embark on its first full U.S. tour. Atom Heart Mother is a 1970 (see 1970 in music) progressive rock album by Pink Floyd. ... Probably best known as the co-author of Pink Floyds Atom Heart Mother in 1970, composer, performer, sound architect, writer, lecturer, broadcaster and interactive designer Ron Geesin also collaborated with Roger Waters on the innovative Music from the Body in 1970, a recording that employed organic sounds as instruments. ... Atom Heart Mother is a six-part suite by progressive rock band Pink Floyd, composed by the whole band and Ron Geesin. ... Symphonic rock is a subgenre of rock music, and more specifically, progressive rock. ... If is a song by Pink Floyd on their album Atom Heart Mother. ... Fat Old Sun is a Pink Floyd song written and sung by [[David Gilmour. ... Summer 68 is a song by Pink Floyd on their album Atom Heart Mother. ... Alans Psychedelic Breakfast is a three-part instrumental track from the 1970 Pink Floyd album Atom Heart Mother. ... Sound collage is the production of songs, musical compositions, or recordings using portions, or samples, of previously made recordings. ... Sound effects or audio effects are artificially created or enhanced sounds, or sound processes used to emphasize artistic or other content of movies, video games, music, or other media. ...


Before releasing its next original album, the band released a compilation album, Relics, which contained several early singles and B-sides, along with one original song (Waters' jazzy "Biding My Time", part of The Man/The Journey recorded during the Ummagumma sessions). They also contributed to the soundtrack of Zabriskie Point, though many of their contributions were eventually discarded by director Michelangelo Antonioni.-1... “B-Sides” redirects here. ... Biding My Time is a composition by Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters. ... Zabriskie Point is a 1970 film by Michelangelo Antonioni that depicts the U.S. counterculture movement of that time. ... Michelangelo Antonioni (September 29, 1912 - July 30, 2007) was an Italian modernist film director whose films are widely considered as some of the most influential in film aesthetics. ...


Breakthrough era: 1971–1975

During this time, Pink Floyd shed their association with the "psychedelic" scene and became a distinctive band who were difficult to classify. The divergent styles of their primary songwriters, Gilmour, Waters and Wright, merged into a unique sound, which quickly became known among fans as "The Pink Floyd Sound". This era contains what many consider to be two of the band's masterpiece albums, The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here. This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Pink Floyd performing at Earls Court, 1973
Pink Floyd performing at Earls Court, 1973

The sound became polished and collaborative, with the philosophic lyrics and distinctive bass lines of Waters combining with the unique blues guitar style of Gilmour and Wright's haunting keyboard melodies, and harmonic textures. Gilmour was the dominant vocalist throughout this period, and female choirs and Dick Parry's saxophone contributions became a notable part of the band's style. The sometimes atonal and harsh sound exhibited in the band's earlier years gave way to a very smooth, mellow and soothing sound, and the band's epic, lengthy compositions reached their zenith with "Echoes". This period was not only the beginning but the end of the truly collaborative era of the band; after 1973 Waters' influence became more dominant musically as well as lyrically. Wright's last credited composition and last lead vocal on a studio album until 1994's The Division Bell were in this period ("Time" and "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" respectively), and Gilmour's writing credits sharply declined in frequency until Waters left the band in 1985, though he continued to perform lead vocals and write songs throughout the whole time. The last ties with Barrett were severed in musical fashion with Wish You Were Here, whose epic track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" was written both as a tribute and eulogy to Barrett. The epic, 26-minute piece was described by Gilmour as "Roger's paean to Syd". Dick Parry is a saxophonist born in 1944. ... A studio album is a collection of studio-recorded tracks by a recording artist. ... The Dark Side of the Moon Tracks Speak to Me (1:08) Breathe (2:48) On the Run (3:31) Time / Breathe (Reprise) (7:04) The Great Gig in the Sky (4:47) Money (6:23) Us and Them (7:48) Any Colour You Like (3:25) Brain Damage (3... Shine On You Crazy Diamond is an epic nine-part Pink Floyd composition with lyrics written by Roger Waters, in tribute to former band member Syd Barrett, and music written by Waters, Richard Wright, and David Gilmour. ...


The band's sound was considerably more focused on Meddle (1971), with the 23-minute epic "Echoes" taking up the second side of the LP. "Echoes" is a smooth progressive rock song with extended guitar and keyboard solos and a long segue in the middle consisting largely of synthesised music produced on guitars, organs, and synths, along with backward wah pedal guitar sounding like samples of sea gulls or albatross and an entire whale song playing over the top, described by Waters as a "sonic poem".[26] The song took a while to construct, and went through many named stages, including "Nothings","Son Of Nothings" and "Return Of The Son Of Nothings". The latter was performed at their free Hyde Park concert and was well received by the crowd. Meddle was considered by Nick Mason to be "the first real Pink Floyd album. It introduced the idea of a theme that can be returned to."[27] The album had the sound and style of the succeeding breakthrough-era Pink Floyd albums but stripped away the orchestra that was prominent in Atom Heart Mother.[28] Meddle also included the atmospheric "One of These Days", a concert favourite featuring Nick Mason's menacing one-line vocal ("One of these days, I'm going to cut you into little pieces"), distorted and bluesy lap steel guitar, and a melody that at one point fades into a throbbing synthetic pulse quoting the theme tune of the cult classic science fiction television show Doctor Who. The mellow feeling of the next three albums is very present on "Fearless", and this track displays a folk influence, as does the prominent lap steel guitar on "A Pillow of Winds". The latter track is one of the Floyd's very few acoustic love songs. Waters' role as lead songwriter began to take form, with his jazzy "San Tropez" brought to the band practically completed and ready to record. Meddle was greeted both by critics[29] and fans enthusiastically, and Pink Floyd were rewarded with a #3 album chart peak in the UK; it only reached #70 in U.S. charts.[16] According to Nick Mason, this was partly because Capitol Records had not provided the album with enough publicity support in the U.S.[30] Today, Meddle remains one of their most well-regarded efforts.[14] Alternate cover U.S./Canadian releases cover Meddle is an album by English progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd song. ... Meddle track listing One of These Days (1) A Pillow of Winds (2) One of These Days is the opening track from Pink Floyds 1971 album Meddle. ... Chandler electric lap steel guitar, a modern solid body with the classic Weissenborn profile. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the television series. ... Meddle track listing A Pillow of Winds (2) Fearless (3) San Tropez (4) Fearless is the title of the third track on Meddle by Pink Floyd. ... Lap Steel Guitar (also called Hawaiian Guitar or simply lap steel or steel guitar) is a type of guitar, and a method of playing the instrument. ... A Pillow of Winds is the second track from Pink Floyds 1971 album Meddle. ... A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... San Tropez is the title of the fourth track from the album Meddle by the band Pink Floyd. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label owned by EMI and located in Hollywood, California. ...


Obscured by Clouds was released in 1972 as the soundtrack to the film La Vallee, another art house film by Barbet Schroeder. This was the band's first U.S. Top 50 album (where it hit #46), hitting at #6 in the UK.[16] While Mason described the album years later as "sensational,"[31] it is less well-regarded by critics.[14] The lyrics of "Free Four", the first Pink Floyd song to achieve significant airplay in the U.S., introduced Waters' ruminations on his father's death in World War II which would figure in subsequent albums. Two other songs on the album, "Wot's... Uh the Deal" and "Childhood's End", also hint at themes used in later albums, the former focusing on loneliness and desperation which would come to full fruit in the Roger Waters-led era, and the latter hinting much at the next album, fixated on life, death and the passage of time. "Childhood's End", inspired by the Arthur C. Clarke book of the same name, was also Gilmour's last lyrical contribution for 15 years.[31] The album was, to an extent, stylistically different from the preceding Meddle, with the songs generally being shorter, often taking a somewhat pastoral approach compared to the atmospheric use of sound effects and keyboard on sections of Meddle, and sometimes even running into folk-rock, blues-rock and piano-driven soft rock ("Burning Bridges", "The Gold It's in the..." and "Stay" being the best examples for each). Obscured by Clouds is a rock album by Pink Floyd based on their soundtrack for the French film La Vallée. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Andrei Tarkovskys The Mirror Le Fantôme de la liberté, one of the last films by Luis Bunuel (1974), which depicts seemingly random events, disrupting the conventions of storytelling in film. ... The Top 50 refers to a list of weekly hit singles, or albums. ... Free Four is a Pink Floyd song written by Roger Waters, with Waters also taking on lead vocals, from the album Obscured by Clouds. ... Wots. ... Childhoods End is a song from Pink Floyds 1972 album Obscured by Clouds. ... Sri Lankabhimanya Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (16 December 1917–19 March 2008), was a British science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, most famous for the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, written in collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick, a collaboration which led also to the film of the same name... This article is about a novel. ... -1... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Burning Bridges is a song from Pink Floyds 1972 album, Obscured by Clouds. ... The Gold Its In The. ... Stay is a song from Pink Floyds 1972 album, Obscured by Clouds. ...


The release of Pink Floyd's massively successful 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon, was a watershed moment in the band's popularity. Pink Floyd had stopped issuing singles after 1968's "Point Me at the Sky" and was never a hit-single-driven group, but The Dark Side of the Moon featured a U.S. Top 20 single ("Money").[13] The album became the band's first #1 on U.S. charts[16] and, as of December 2006, is one of the biggest-selling albums in U.S. history, with more than 15 million units sold,[3] and one of the best-selling albums worldwide, with more than 40 million copies sold.[16] The critically-acclaimed album stayed on the Billboard Top 200 for an unprecedented 741 weeks (including 591 consecutive weeks from 1976 to 1988),[32] establishing a world record. It also remained 301 weeks on UK charts, despite never rising higher than #2 there,[16] and is highly praised by critics.[33] This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... Point Me At The Sky is a single by the British band Pink Floyd. ... Alternate cover Cover of the singles 2003 re-issue (which coincided with the release of the albums 30th anniversary SACD re-issue) The Dark Side of the Moon Tracks Speak to Me (1:08) Breathe (2:48) On the Run (3:31) Time / Breathe (Reprise) (7:04) The... This is a list of the worlds best-selling albums, as determined by sources that have a history as being trustworthy and reliable. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ...


Saxophone forms an important part of the album's sound, exposing the band's jazz influences (especially that of Rick Wright), and female backing vocals play a key role in helping to diversify the album's texture. For example, songs such as "Money" and "Time" are placed on either side of mellow lap steel guitar sounds (reminiscent of Meddle) in "Breathe (Reprise)" and female vocal-laden song "The Great Gig in the Sky" (with Clare Torry on lead vocal), while minimalist instrumental "On the Run" is performed almost entirely on a single synthesiser. Incidental sound effects and snippets of interviews feature alongside the music, many of them taped in the studio. Waters' interviews started out with questions like "What is your favourite colour?" in an attempt to get the person comfortable. He would then ask, "When was the last time you were violent? Were you in the right?" The latter answer was played on the album. Other interviews would ask, "Are you afraid of dying?" The album's lyrics and sound attempt to describe the different pressures that everyday life places upon human beings. This concept (conceived by Waters in a band meeting around Mason's kitchen table)[34] proved a powerful catalyst for the band and together they drew up a list of themes, several of which would be revisited by Waters on later albums, such as "Us and Them"'s musings on violence and the futility of war, and the themes of insanity and neurosis discussed in "Brain Damage". The album's complicated and precise sound engineering by Alan Parsons set new standards for sound fidelity; this trait became a recognisable aspect of the band's sound and played a part in the lasting chart success of the album, as audiophiles constantly replaced their worn-out copies.[32] Breathe (Reprise) is a song by Pink Floyd. ... The Great Gig in the Sky is the fourth track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Clare Torry is a British singer, best known for her soulfully evocative wordless vocals on Pink Floyds The Great Gig in the Sky on the 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon Torry has also performed as a session singer and live backing vocalist with Olivia Newton-John... On the Run is the third track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... The Dark Side of the Moon Tracks Speak to Me (1:08) Breathe (2:48) On the Run (3:31) Time / Breathe (Reprise) (7:04) The Great Gig in the Sky (4:47) Money (6:23) Us and Them (7:48) Any Colour You Like (3:25) Brain Damage (3... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Neurosis, also known as psychoneurosis or neurotic disorder, is a catch all term that refers to any mental imbalance that causes distress, but, unlike a psychosis or some personality disorders, does not prevent or affect rational thought. ... Brain Damage is the ninth track[1] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Audio engineering is a part of audio science dealing with the recording and reproduction of sound through mechanical and electronic means. ... Alan Parsons (b. ...


Seeking to capitalise on its new-found fame, the band also released a compilation album, A Nice Pair, which was a gatefold repackaging of The Piper at the Gates of Dawn and A Saucerful of Secrets. It was also during this period that director Adrian Maben released the first Pink Floyd concert film, Live at Pompeii. The original theatrical cut featured footage of the band performing in 1971 at an amphitheatre in Pompeii with no audience present except the film crew and stage staff. Maben also recorded interviews and behind-the-scenes glimpses of the band during recording sessions for The Dark Side of the Moon at Abbey Road Studios; although the timeline of events indicate the recording sessions may have been staged after the recording, they provide a glimpse into the processes involved in producing the album. This footage was incorporated in later video releases of Live at Pompeii. A Nice Pair is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... A gatefold cover or gatefold LP is a form of packaging for LP records which was popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... i went a free film from you to wacth ... For other uses, see Pompeii (disambiguation). ... The recording studio Abbey Road Studios, established in November of 1931 by EMI in London, England, is an iconic recording studio located at Abbey Road, in St Johns Wood in the City of Westminster. ...


After the success of Dark Side, the band were unsure of their future direction and worried about how they would be able to top that record's huge popularity. In a return to their experimental beginnings, they began work on a project entitled Household Objects, which would consist of songs played literally on household appliances. Instruments consisted of old hand mixers, rubber bands stretched between two tables, wine glasses, etc. However, the planned album was soon shelved after the band decided that it was just easier and better to play the songs on actual musical instruments. No finished recordings of these sessions exist, however some of the recorded effects were put to use on their next album.


Wish You Were Here, released in 1975, carries an abstract theme of absence: absence of any humanity within the music industry and, most poignantly, the absence of Syd Barrett. Well-known for its popular title track, the album includes the largely instrumental, nine-part song suite "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", a tribute to Barrett in which the lyrics deal explicitly with the aftermath of his breakdown. Many of the musical influences in the band's past were brought together — atmospheric keyboards, blues guitar pieces, extended saxophone solos (by Dick Parry), jazz-fusion workouts and aggressive slide guitar — in the suite's different linked parts, culminating in a funeral dirge played with synthesised horn and ending with a musical quote from their early single "See Emily Play" as a final nod to Barrett's early leadership of the band.[35] The remaining tracks on the album, "Welcome to the Machine" and "Have a Cigar", harshly criticise the music industry; the latter is sung by British folk singer Roy Harper. It was the first Pink Floyd album to reach #1 on both the UK and the U.S. charts,[36] and critics praised it just as enthusiastically as The Dark Side of the Moon.[14] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Wish You Were Here (song) redirects here. ... For the technique, see Slide (guitar technique). ... Welcome to the Machine is the second song on Pink Floyds 1975 album Wish You Were Here. ... Have a Cigar is the third track on Pink Floyds 1975 album Wish You Were Here. ... Roy Harper (born June 12, 1941), is an English rock singer-songwriter / guitarist who specialises in folk music. ...


In a famous anecdote, a heavyset man, his head and eyebrows completely shaved, wandered into the studio while the band was mixing "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". The band could not recognise him for some time, when suddenly one of them realised it was Syd Barrett. On being asked how he had put on so much weight, he retorted "I've got a big fridge in the kitchen and I've been eating a lot of pork chops".[37]


In an interview for the 2001 BBC Omnibus documentary Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond (later released on DVD as The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story[7]), the story is told in full. Rick Wright spoke about the session, saying: "One thing that really stands out in my mind, that I'll never forget; I was going in to the "Shine On" sessions. I went in the studio and I saw this guy sitting at the back of the studio, he was only as far away as you are from me. And I didn't recognise him. I said, 'Who's that guy behind you?' 'That's Syd.' And I just cracked up, I couldn't believe it... he had shaven all his hair off... I mean, his eyebrows, everything... he was jumping up and down brushing his teeth, it was awful. And, uh, I was in, I mean Roger was in tears, I think I was; we were both in tears. It was very shocking... seven years of no contact and then to walk in while we're actually doing that particular track. I don't know – coincidence, karma, fate, who knows? But it was very, very, very powerful". In the same documentary, Nick Mason stated: "When I think about it, I can still see his eyes, but... it was everything else that was different". In that same interview, Roger Waters has said: "I had no idea who he was for a very long time". David Gilmour stated: "None of us recognised him. Shaved...shaved bald head and very plump". In the 2006 'definitive edition' DVD release of The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story in the UK/Europe, the director John Edginton's interviews with Barrett's former Floyd colleagues are included unedited, with far more detail of their feelings and actions during Syd Barrett's tragic breakdown and withdrawal from the band. Richard Wright, also known as Rick Wright (born July 28, 1945), is the keyboard player of Pink Floyd. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ...


Roger Waters – led era: 1976–1985

During this era, Waters asserted more and more control over Pink Floyd's output. During the recording, Waters fired Richard Wright after The Wall was finished, arguing that Wright was not contributing much,[38] in part due to a cocaine addiction.[39] Waters claimed that David Gilmour and Nick Mason supported Waters' decision to fire Wright, but in 2000, Gilmour stated that he and Mason were against Wright's dismissal.[40] Author Nick Mason claims that Wright was fired because Columbia Records had offered Waters a substantial bonus to finish the album in time for a 1979 release. Since Wright refused to return early from his summer holiday, Waters wanted to dismiss Wright.[41] Wright was fired from the band but stayed on to finish the album and perform the live concerts as a paid musician. Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ...


Much of the music from this period is considered secondary to the lyrics, which explore Waters' feelings about his father's death in World War II and his increasingly cynical attitude towards political figures such as Margaret Thatcher and Mary Whitehouse. Although still finely nuanced, the music grew more guitar-based at the expense of keyboards and saxophone, both of which became (at best) part of the music's background texture along with the usual sound effects. A full orchestra (even larger than the brass ensemble from Atom Heart Mother) plays a significant role on The Wall and especially The Final Cut. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


By January 1977, and the release of Animals (UK #2, U.S. #3),[16] the band's music came under increasing criticism from some quarters in the new punk rock sphere as being too flabby and pretentious, having lost its way from the simplicity of early rock and roll.[42] Animals was, however, considerably more guitar-driven than the previous albums, due to either the influence of the burgeoning punk-rock movement or the fact that the album was recorded at Pink Floyd's new (and somewhat incomplete) Britannia Row Studios. The album was also the first to not have a single songwriting credit for Rick Wright. Animals again contained lengthy songs tied to a theme, this time taken in part from George Orwell's Animal Farm, which used "Pigs", "Dogs" and "Sheep" as metaphors for members of contemporary society. Despite the prominence of guitar, keyboards and synthesizers still play an important role on Animals, but the saxophone and female vocal work that defined much of the previous two albums' sound is absent. The result is a more hard-rock effort overall, bookended by two parts of a quiet acoustic piece. Many critics did not respond well to the album, finding it "tedious" and "bleak,"[43] although some celebrated it for almost those very reasons.[14] For the cover artwork, a giant inflatable pig was commissioned to float between the chimney towers of London's Battersea Power Station. However, the wind made the pig balloon difficult to control,[44] and in the end it was necessary to matte a photo of the pig balloon onto the album cover. The pig was created by Dutch industrial designer and artist Theo Botschuijver. The pig nevertheless became one of the enduring symbols of Pink Floyd, and inflatable pigs were a staple of Pink Floyd live performances from then on. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Britannia Row Studios is a recording studio located in London, England, N1. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ... Pigs (Three Different Ones) is a song from Pink Floyds 1977 album Animals. ... Sheep is a song by the English band Pink Floyd. ... The infamous Pink Floyd Pig is one of the staples of Pink Floyd, one of the most famous European Rock bands in history. ... Battersea Power Station viewed from the north bank of the River Thames at Pimlico. ... Mattes are used in photography and filmmaking to insert part of a foreground image onto a background image, which is often a matte painting, a background filmed by the second unit, or computer generated imagery. ... Example of industrial design item - hanger chair Industrial design is an applied art whereby the aesthetics and usability of products may be improved for marketability and production. ... Pink Floyd are pioneers in the live music experience, renowned for their lavish stage shows that combine over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. ...


In 1978 the band were told that due to legal matters involving tax, they had to leave the United Kingdom for one year, with absolutely no visits in between. It was during this time that the band started to pursue their own interests and focus less on music, and so when they re-met (although contact was not infrequent) in the UK, they were short of ideas. It was then that it came to light that Waters had been working on two projects, The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking and The Wall. The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking is a concept album by British musician Roger Waters. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ...


1979's epic rock opera The Wall, conceived by Waters, dealt with the themes of loneliness and failed communication, which were expressed by the metaphor of a wall built between a rock artist and his audience. The deciding moment in which to conceive The Wall was during a concert in Montreal, Canada in which Roger Waters spat at an audience member who had been shouting unhelpful comments and requesting songs throughout the show. It was this point where Waters felt the alienation between audience and band. This album gave Pink Floyd renewed acclaim and their only chart-topping single with "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)".[13] The Wall also included the future concert staples "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", with the former in particular becoming a cornerstone of album-oriented rock and classic-rock radio playlists as well as one of the group's best-known songs. The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... This article is about the three songs by Pink Floyd. ... Staples may mean: Abram Penn Staples Billy Staples Chris Staples Curtis Staples Greg Staples Isaac Staples Jim Staples (rugby player) Mavis Staples Neville Staples Peter Staples Pops Staples Sam Staples (cricketer) Todd Staples Waller Redd Staples Staples, Minnesota Staples Inc. ... The Wall Disc Two track listing Comfortably Numb is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd, which was released on the 1979 double album The Wall. ... The Wall track listing In the Flesh (Track 8) Run Like Hell (Track 9) Waiting for the Worms (Track 10) Run Like Hell is a song on the Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Album-oriented rock (sometimes referred to as adult-oriented rock), abbreviated AOR and originally called album-oriented radio, was originally an American FM radio format focusing on album tracks by rock artists. ... Genre Classic rock was originally conceived as a radio station broadcasting format and although loosely defined, it generally includes the music from rock bands formed between the early 1960s and late 1970s. ...


The album was co-produced by Bob Ezrin, a friend of Waters who shared songwriting credits on "The Trial" and from whom Waters later distanced himself after Ezrin "shot his mouth off to the press."[45] Even more than during the Animals sessions, Waters was asserting his artistic influence and leadership over the band, using the band's perilous financial situation to his advantage, which prompted increased conflicts with the other members. The music had become distinctly more hard-rock, although the large orchestrations on some tracks recalled an earlier period, and there are a few quieter songs interspersed throughout (such as "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Nobody Home", and "Vera"). Wright's influence was minimised, and he was fired from the band during recording, only returning on a fixed wage for the live shows in support of the album. Ironically, this fixed salary made Wright the only "member" of Pink Floyd to make any money from the Wall concerts, with the three remaining members stuck covering the extensive cost overruns of their most spectacular concerts yet.[46] The Wall was performed live in only a few cities, contributing to the "tour"'s lack of profitability. (It would be performed one more time, after the Berlin Wall came down in Germany, by Roger Waters and others). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Trial is a track from the critically-acclaimed rock opera/concept album The Wall, by Pink Floyd. ... Goodbye Blue Sky is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Nobody Home is a song on Pink Floyds album The Wall. ... This song is a reference to Vera Lynn, a British singer during World War II and her popular song Well Meet Again. The reference is ironic, as Roger Waters (and his fictional character Pink) would not meet his father, lost in the war. ... View in 1986 from the west side of graffiti art on the walls infamous death strip Walls poster in memory of the fall. ...


Despite never hitting #1 in the UK (it reached #3), The Wall spent 15 weeks atop the U.S. charts in 1980.[16] Critics praised it,[47] and it has been certified 23x platinum by the RIAA, for sales of 11.5 million copies of the double album in the U.S. alone.[48] The huge commercial success of The Wall made Pink Floyd the only artists since the Beatles to have the best-selling albums of two years (1973 and 1980) in less than a decade. The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ...


A film entitled Pink Floyd: The Wall was released in 1982, incorporating almost all of the music from the album. The film, written by Waters and directed by Alan Parker, starred Boomtown Rats founder Bob Geldof, who re-recorded many of the vocals, and featured animation by noted British artist and cartoonist Gerald Scarfe. Film critic Leonard Maltin referred to the movie as "the world's longest rock video, and certainly the most depressing", but it grossed over US$14 million at the North American box office.[49] A song which first appeared in the movie, "When the Tigers Broke Free", was released as a single on a limited basis. This song was finally made widely available on the compilation album Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd and the re-release of The Final Cut. Also in the film is the song "What Shall We Do Now?", which was cut out of the original album due to the time constraints of vinyl records. The only songs from the album not used were "Hey You" and "The Show Must Go On." Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Alan Parker on the set of Pink Floyd The Wall Sir Alan Parker (born February 14, 1944) is a British film director, producer, writer, and actor. ... The Boomtown Rats The Boomtown Rats (1975-1985) were a punk rock/new wave group headed by Bob Geldof, who was later known for organizing charity rock concerts such as Band Aid (intended to help famine victims in Ethiopia), Live Aid, Live 8, and Hands Across America (intended to help... Robert Frederick Xenon Geldof[1], KBE[2], known as Bob Geldof (born 5 October 1951) [3], is an Irish singer, songwriter, actor and political activist. ... Gerald Scarfe (born 1936) is a British cartoonist and illustrator whose work is characterised by an apparent obsession with the grotesque and diseased, perhaps a result of an asthmatic, bed-ridden childhood. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... When the Tigers Broke Free is a song by Roger Waters describing the death of his father, Eric Fletcher Waters, in World War II. The song was written specifically for the 1982 movie version of Pink Floyds album The Wall and first released as a 7 single on July... A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ... Alternate uses: Echoes (disambiguation) Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... The Final Cut is a rock album by Pink Floyd recorded at several studios in the UK from July to December 1982. ... What Shall We Do Now? is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd, written by Roger Waters. ... Manufacturers put records inside protective and decorative cardboard jackets and an inner paper sleeve to protect the grooves from dust and scratches. ... Hey You is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... The Show Must Go On, a song by popular British rock band, Pink Floyd, that appeared on their 1979 rock epic The Wall. ...


Their 1983 studio album, The Final Cut, was dedicated by Waters to his father, Eric Fletcher Waters. Even darker in tone than The Wall, this album re-examined many previous themes, while also addressing then-current events, including Waters' anger at Britain's participation in the Falklands War, the blame for which he laid squarely at the feet of political leaders ("The Fletcher Memorial Home"). It concludes with a cynical and frightening glimpse at the possibility of nuclear war ("Two Suns in the Sunset"). Michael Kamen and Andy Bown contributed keyboard work in lieu of Richard Wright, whose departure had not been formally announced before the album's release. The Final Cut is a rock album by Pink Floyd recorded at several studios in the UK from July to December 1982. ... Eric Fletcher Waters (born 1913 - died February 18, 1944) was a soldier in World War II. He was the father of Roger Waters, an English rock musician and songwriter, and was a major influence on his songwriting, despite never having met him. ... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... The Fletcher Memorial Home is a song by Roger Waters, performed by Pink Floyd. ... The Titan II ICBM carried a 9 Mt W53 warhead, making it one of the most powerful nuclear weapons fielded by the United States during the Cold War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Michael Kamen (April 15, 1948 – November 18, 2003) was an American composer (especially of film scores), orchestral arranger, orchestral conductor, song writer, and session musician. ... Andy Bown was born Andrew Steven Bown on 27 March 1946, in London. ...


Though technically a Pink Floyd album, the LP's front cover displayed no words, only the back cover reading: "The Final Cut — A requiem for the post-war dream by Roger Waters, performed by Pink Floyd: Roger Waters, David Gilmour, Nick Mason". Roger Waters received the sole songwriting credit for the entire record, which became a prototype in sound and form for later Waters solo projects. Waters has since said that he offered to release the record as a solo album, but the rest of the band rejected this idea. However, in his book Inside Out, drummer Nick Mason says that no such discussions ever took place. Gilmour reportedly asked Waters to hold back the release of the album so that he could write enough material to contribute, but this request was refused. The music's tone is largely similar to The Wall's but somewhat quieter and softer, resembling songs like "Nobody Home" more than "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)." It is also more repetitive, with certain leitmotifs cropping up continually. Only moderately successful with fans by Floyd's standards (UK #1, U.S. #6),[16] but reasonably well-received by critics,[50] the album yielded one minor radio hit (albeit in censored form), "Not Now John", the only hard-rock song on the album (and the only one partially sung by Gilmour). The arguments between Waters and Gilmour at this stage were rumoured to be so bad that they were supposedly never seen in the recording studio simultaneously. Gilmour has said he wanted to continue making good quality rock music, and felt Waters was constructing music sequences together merely as a vehicle for his socially critical lyrics. Waters claims that his bandmates never fully understood the importance of the social commentary he was making. By the end of recording, Gilmour's co-producer credit was dropped from the album sleeve (though he received attendant royalties).[51] There was no tour for the album, although parts of it have since been performed live by Waters on his subsequent solo tours. A leitmotif (also spelled leitmotiv) is a recurring musical theme, associated within a particular piece of music with a particular person, place or idea. ... Not Now John is a song from Pink Floyds 1983 album, The Final Cut. ...


After The Final Cut Capitol Records released the compilation Works, which made the 1970 Waters track "Embryo" available for the first time on a Pink Floyd album, although the track had been released on the 1970 VA compilation Picnic - A Breath of Fresh Air on the Harvest Records label.[52] The band members then went their separate ways and spent time working on individual projects. Gilmour was the first to release his solo album About Face in March 1984. Wright joined forces with Dave Harris of Fashion to form a new band, Zee, which released the experimental album Identity a month after Gilmour's project. In May 1984, Waters released The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking, a concept album once proposed as a Pink Floyd project. Waters had written this at the same time as The Wall and during proposal of both, the band selected The Wall. A year after his bandmates' projects, Mason released the album Profiles, a collaboration with Rick Fenn of 10cc which featured guest appearances by Gilmour and UFO keyboardist Danny Peyronel. Works is a Pink Floyd compilation album released in 1983 by their former American label, Capitol Records, to compete with their then-current album The Final Cut. ... The term Various Artists is used in the record industry when numerous singers and musicians collaborate on a song or collection of songs. ... Picnic - A Breath of Fresh Air is a compilation album issued by the Harvest Records label, originally released in 1970. ... Harvest Records was a record label, formed by EMI in 1969 to promote progressive rock music and to compete with Philips Vertigo label and Deccas Deram labels. ... About Face is the second solo album of the Pink Floyd guitarist, David Gilmour, released in March 1984. ... Fashion were a 1980s British band consisting of De Harriss, Luke James,Alan Darby, Mulligan, Marlon Recchi and Dik Davis. ... Zee was formed in 1983, with Richard Wright and Dave Harris. ... Identity is the only album by Zee, a short-lived partnership consisting of Pink Floyd keyboardist Richard Wright and Dave Harris of New Romantic outfit Fashion. ... The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking is a concept album by British musician Roger Waters. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... For other uses of the term profiles, please see profile. ... 10cc was a British pop band which achieved its greatest commercial success during the 1970s. ... UFO are an English rock band formed in 1969. ...


David Gilmour – led era: 1987–1995

Waters announced in December 1985 that he was departing Pink Floyd, describing the band as "a spent force", but in 1986 Gilmour and Mason began recording a new Pink Floyd album. At the same time, Roger Waters was working on his second solo album, entitled Radio K.A.O.S. (1987). A bitter legal dispute ensued with Waters claiming that the name "Pink Floyd" should have been put to rest, but Gilmour and Mason upheld their conviction that they had the legal right to continue as "Pink Floyd." The suit was eventually settled out of court.[53] This article is about the Roger Waters album. ...


After considering and rejecting many other titles, the new album was released as A Momentary Lapse of Reason (UK #3, U.S. #3).[16] Without Waters, who had been the band's dominant songwriter for a decade, the band sought the help of outside writers. As Pink Floyd had never done this before (except for the orchestral contributions of Geesin and Ezrin), this move received much criticism. Ezrin, who had renewed his friendship with Gilmour in 1983 (as Ezrin co-produced Gilmour's About Face album), served as co-producer as well as being one of these writers along with Jon Carin who wrote the music for "Learning To Fly" and played much of the Keyboards on the album.[54] Wright also returned, at first as a salaried employee during the final recording sessions, and then officially rejoining the band after the subsequent tour. Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Gilmour later admitted that Mason and Wright had hardly played on the album. Because of Mason and Wright's limited contributions, some critics say that A Momentary Lapse of Reason should really be regarded as a Gilmour solo effort, in much the same way that The Final Cut might be regarded as a Waters album.[14]


A year later, the band released a double live album and a concert video taken from its 1988 Long Island shows, entitled Delicate Sound of Thunder, and later recorded some instrumentals for a classic-car racing film La Carrera Panamericana, set in Mexico and featuring Gilmour and Mason as participating drivers. During the race Gilmour and manager Steve O'Rourke (acting as his map-reader) crashed. O'Rourke suffered a broken leg, but Gilmour walked away with just some bruises. This article is about the island in New York State. ... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd live double album from the David Gilmour-led era of the band which was recorded over five nights at the Nassau Coliseum in Long Island, New York in August 1988 and mixed at Abbey Road Studios in September 1988. ... La Carrera Panamericana is a 1992 video of the Carrera Panamericana automobile race in Mexico. ...

David Gilmour in a break during the "Carrera Panamericana", in San Luis Potosi, Mexico
David Gilmour in a break during the "Carrera Panamericana", in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

The instrumentals are notable for including the first Floyd material co-written by Wright since 1975, as well as the only Floyd material co-written by Mason since Dark Side of the Moon.


1992 saw the box set release of Shine On. The 9-disc set included re-releases of the studio albums A Saucerful of Secrets, Meddle, The Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here, Animals, The Wall, and A Momentary Lapse of Reason. A bonus disc entitled The Early Singles was also included. The set's packaging featured a case allowing the albums to stand vertically together, with the side-by-side spines displaying an image of the Dark Side of the Moon cover. The circular text of each CD includes the almost illegible words "The Big Bong Theory". The year also saw the release of Roger Waters' solo album Amused to Death. A box set (sometimes referred to as a boxed set) is one or more musical recordings, films, television programs, or other collection of related things that are contained in a box. ... Shine On is a nine CD box set by Pink Floyd which was released in 1992 to coincide with Pink Floyds 25th Anniversary as a recording and touring band. ... For Céline Dions album by the same name, see The Early Singles. ... Amused to Death is a solo album by former Pink Floyd member Roger Waters, released in 1992 (see 1992 in music). ...


The band's next recording was the 1994 release, The Division Bell, which was much more of a group effort than Momentary Lapse had been, with Wright now reinstated as a full band member. The album was received more favourably by critics and fans alike than Lapse had been,[55] but was still heavily criticised as tired and formulaic.[56] It was the second Pink Floyd album to reach #1 on both the UK and U.S. charts.[16] This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ...


The Division Bell was another concept album, in some ways representing Gilmour's take on the same themes Waters had tackled with The Wall. The title was suggested to Gilmour by his friend Douglas Adams. Many of the lyrics were co-written by Polly Samson, Gilmour's girlfriend at the time, whom he married shortly after the album's release. Besides Samson, the album featured most of the musicians who had joined the A Momentary Lapse of Reason tour, as well as saxophonist Dick Parry, a contributor to the mid-70s Floyd albums. Anthony Moore, who had co-written the lyrics for several songs on the previous album, wrote lyrics for Wright's tune "Wearing the Inside Out", also Wright's first lead vocal on a Pink Floyd record since Dark Side of the Moon. This writing collaboration continued on Wright's 1996 solo album, Broken China. Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... Polly Samson, journalist and writer, was born in London in 1962 to a diplomatic correspondent father and a writer mother of Chinese descent (mother, Esther Cheo Ying, wrote a memoir Black County Girl In Red China, about her time serving as a Major in Mao Zedongs Red Army) . Following... Broken China is a solo album by Pink Floyd keyboard player Richard Wright. ...


The band released a live album entitled P*U*L*S*E in 1995. It hit #1 in U.S. and featured songs recorded during the "Division Bell" tour, primarily from concerts in Londons Earl Court. The Division Bell concerts featured a mix of classic and modern Pink Floyd. The Pulse album has an entire performance of The Dark Side of the Moon.[16] VHS and Laserdisc versions of the concert at London's Earl's Court 20 October 1994, were also released. A DVD edition was released on 10 July 2006[57] and quickly topped the charts. The 1994 CD case had an LED, timer IC, and battery which caused a red flash to blink once per second, like a heartbeat, as it sat in the owner's CD collection. P·U·L·S·E (also referred to as Pulse) is a live double CD by Pink Floyd, released in 1995. ... The Earls Court Exhibition Centre (also known as Earls Court Arena or often simply Earls Court) is located in West London, England on the boundary between the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and Hammersmith and Fulham. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... P*U*L*S*E is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the October 20, 1994 concert at Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, in The Division Bell tour, which is currently available on DVD. There was considerable delay in the release of the DVD edition of P*U*L... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... LED redirects here. ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips (EPROM memory) with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ...


Furthermore, in 1995, the band received their first and only Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for "Marooned". Despite worldwide high expectations, band leader Gimour ceased planning new tours for Pink Floyd after their "Division Bell" tour. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance has been awarded since 1980. ... The song Marooned is an instrumental track on Pink Floyds 1994 album The Division Bell. ...


Solo work and more: 1995–present

On 17 January 1996, the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame[58] by The Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan. Roger Waters did not attend, still being antagonistic towards his former bandmates. At their acceptance speech, Gilmour said, "I'll have to grab a couple more of these for our two band members that started playing different tunes; Roger and Syd...". Although Mason was present to accept the award, he did not join Gilmour and Wright (and Billy Corgan) for their acoustic performance of 'Wish You Were Here'. is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... William Patrick Corgan, Jr. ...


A live recording of The Wall was released in 2000, compiled from the 1980–1981 London concerts, entitled Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980–81. It reached #19 on the American album chart. In 2001, a remastered two-disc set of the band's best-known tracks entitled Echoes was released. Gilmour, Mason, Waters and Wright all collaborated on the editing, sequencing, and song selection of the included tracks. Minor controversy was caused due to the songs seguing into one another non-chronologically, presenting the material out of the context of the original albums. Some of the tracks, such as "Echoes", "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", "Marooned", and "High Hopes" have had substantial sections removed from them. The album reached #2 on the UK and U.S. charts.[16] Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980-81 Is There Anybody out There?, The Wall Live Pink Floyd 1980-81 is an album released by Pink Floyd in 2000. ... Alternate uses: Echoes (disambiguation) Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... The Division Bell track listing High Hopes is a song from the 1994 Pink Floyd album, The Division Bell, written by David Gilmour and Polly Samson. ...


In 2003, an SACD reissue of The Dark Side of the Moon was released with new artwork on the front cover. The album was also re-released as an 180 gram, virgin vinyl pressing in 2003, which included all the original album art from the original release of the album, albeit with a new poster. The reissue of Wish You Were Here is in the works, with no release date announced.[59] Nick Mason's book, Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd was published in 2004 in Europe and 2005 in the U.S. Mason made public promotional appearances in a few European and American cities, giving interviews and meeting fans at book signings. Some fans claimed that he said he wished he were on a tour with the band rather than on a book tour. Super Audio CD (SACD) is a read-only optical audio disc format aimed at providing much higher fidelity digital audio reproduction than the Red Book audio CD. Introduced in 2000, it was developed by Sony and Philips Electronics, the same companies that created the Compact Disc. ...


Long-time Pink Floyd manager Steve O'Rourke died on 30 October 2003. Gilmour, Mason and Wright reunited at his funeral and performed "Fat Old Sun" and "The Great Gig in the Sky" in Chichester Cathedral in tribute.[60] is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chichester Cathedral today Chichester Cathedral, illustrated circa 1650 The Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, West Sussex, England is an Anglican Cathedral. ...


Two years later, on 2 July 2005, the band reunited once again for a one-off performance at the London Live 8 concert. This time, however, they were joined by Waters - the first time all four band members were on stage together in 24 years. The band performed a four-song set consisting of "Speak to Me/Breathe/Breathe (Reprise)", "Money", "Wish You Were Here", and "Comfortably Numb", with both Gilmour and Waters sharing lead vocals. At the end of their performance Gilmour said "thank you very much, good night" and started to walk off the stage. Waters called him back, however, and the band shared a group hug that became one of the most famous images of Live 8. is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Speak To Me is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Breathe[1] is the second track[2] from British progressive rock band Pink Floyds 1973 album, The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Money is the 5th/6th song on Pink Floyds famous album Dark Side of the Moon. ... Wish You Were Here is the title track on Pink Floyds 1975 album Wish You Were Here. ... The Wall Disc Two track listing Comfortably Numb is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd, which was released on the 1979 double album The Wall. ...


In the week after Live 8, there was a revival of interest in Pink Floyd. According to record store chain HMV, sales of Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd went up, in the following week, by 1343%, while Amazon.com reported increases in sales of The Wall at 3600%, Wish You Were Here at 2000%, The Dark Side of the Moon at 1400% and Animals at 1000%. David Gilmour subsequently declared that he would donate his share of profits from this sales boom to charity,[61] and urged all the other artists and record companies profiting from Live 8 to do the same. On 16 November 2005 Pink Floyd were inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame by Pete Townshend. Gilmour and Mason attended in person, explaining that Wright was in hospital following eye surgery, and Waters appeared on a video screen, from Rome. Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ... This article is about the trademark. ... Amazon. ... The record industry is the part of the music industry that earns profit by selling sound recordings of music. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The UK Music Hall of Fame honours musicians for their lifetime fame in music. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


David Gilmour released his third solo record, On an Island, on 6 March 2006, and began a tour of small concert venues in Europe, Canada and the U.S. with a band including Richard Wright and was joined several times for the encore by Nick Mason. During the tour, he performed Pink Floyd's first single, "Arnold Layne". Waters was also invited to join them in London, but final rehearsals for his 2006 Europe/U.S. tour required him to decline.[62] Waters was joined on stage by Mason on 29 June 2006 for the second half of a show in Cork, Ireland where he performed the whole of The Dark Side of the Moon. On an Island is the third solo album by David Gilmour, best known as the lead vocalist and guitarist for Pink Floyd. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... After hinting that he was interested in performing The Dark Side of the Moon live again after the Live 8 performance with Pink Floyd, Roger Waters is staging a worldwide tour performing the album in its entirety, beginning at the Rock In Rio festival on 2 June 2006. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Waters and Wright are both reported to be working on solo albums, and there has been talk of Waters doing a Broadway musical version of The Wall, with extra music to be written by Waters. Waters also embarked on his worldwide The Dark Side of the Moon Live Tour; the setlist consisted of The Dark Side of the Moon in its entirety along with a selection of other Pink Floyd favourites and a small number of songs from Waters' solo career. Waters also contributed the song "Hello (I Love You)," cowritten by Howard Shore, to the 2007 film The Last Mimzy. After expressing an interest in reviving The Dark Side of the Moon following his performance with Pink Floyd at Live 8, Roger Waters announced that he would be staging The Dark Side of the Moon Live, a worldwide concert tour. ... Howard Leslie Shore (born October 18, 1946) is an Oscar, Golden Globe and Grammy Award-winning Canadian composer, best known for composing the scores to The Lord of the Rings film trilogy and films of David Cronenberg. ... The Last Mimzy is a 2007 science fiction family film directed by Bob Shaye and loosely adapted from the acclaimed 1943 science fiction short story Mimsy Were the Borogoves authored by Lewis Padgett (the pseudonym of husband and wife team Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore). ...


On May 21, 2008, it was announced that Pink Floyd had been selected as the 2008 Polar Music Prize laureates. The Polar Music Prize is an international music prize and awarded to individuals, groups or institutions in recognition of exceptional achievements in the creation and advancement of music. The prize was founded in 1989 following a donation from Stig Anderson and is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of...


Future directions

Many fans expressed hope that the band's Live 8 appearance would lead to a reunion tour, and a record-breaking US$250 million deal for a world tour was offered,[63] but the band made it clear that they have no such plans. In the weeks after the show, however, the rifts between the members seem to have mostly healed. Gilmour confirmed that he and Waters are on "pretty amicable terms",[64] but Waters has offered conflicting comments on the issue, with statements as varied as "I [can] roll over for one show, but I couldn't roll over for a whole fucking tour"[65] and "I hope we do it again,"[66] although most recently, his statements indicate his desire to play together again, not for a whole tour, but for an event similar to Live 8.[67][68] Pink Floyd are pioneers in the live music experience, renowned for their lavish stage shows that combine over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. ...


On 31 January 2006, David Gilmour issued a joint statement on behalf of the group stating that they have no plans to reunite, refuting rumours from several media outlets.[69] Gilmour later stated in an interview with La Repubblica that he is finished with Pink Floyd and wishes to focus on solo projects and his family. He mentions that he agreed to play Live 8 with Waters to support the cause, to make peace with Waters, and knowing he would regret not taking part.[63] However, he states that Pink Floyd would be willing to perform for a concert "that would support Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts".[70] Then speaking with Billboard, Gilmour changed his "finished with Pink Floyd" sentiment to "who knows". A surprise performance by the post-Waters Pink Floyd line-up of David Gilmour, Rick Wright and Nick Mason occurred on the last performance of David Gilmour's three night run at The Royal Albert Hall on May 31, 2006 as the three played "Wish You Were Here" and "Comfortably Numb". is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... La Repubblica (meaning: The Republic) is an Italian daily newspaper. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ...


2007 saw the 40th anniversary of Pink Floyd's signing to EMI and the 40th anniversary of the release of their first three singles "Arnold Layne", "See Emily Play" and "Apples and Oranges" and their debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. This was marked by the release of a limited edition set containing mono and stereo mixes of the albums, plus tracks from the singles and other rare recordings.


On 10 May 2007, Roger Waters performed at the Syd Barrett tribute concert at the Barbican Centre in London. This was then followed by a surprise performance by the post-Waters Pink Floyd line-up of David Gilmour, Rick Wright and Nick Mason of "Arnold Layne" to a rapturous applause and standing ovation. However, hopes of a second reunion concert with the band's classic lineup were dashed when Waters did not perform with the group. Roger Waters took to the stage to screams of "Pink Floyd!" to which he responded, "Later." Gilmour, Mason, and Wright took to the stage to screams of "Roger Waters!" to which Gilmour politely responded, "Yeah, he was here too, now the rest of us."[71] is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Barbican Arts Centre and lakeside terrace Interior - concert hall foyer; library and gallery above Interior - concert hall with orchestra The Barbican Arts Centre opened in 1982, after a long and at times painful gestation which dated right back to the area having been badly bombed during World War II. Situated...


In a January 2007 interview, Waters suggested he has become more open to a Pink Floyd reunion: “I would have no problem if the rest of them wanted to get together. It wouldn’t even have to be to save the world. It could be just because it would be fun. And people would love it.”[72]


On 25 September 2007, Gilmour stated that a future reunion of Pink Floyd in any form, be it with or without Roger Waters, looked grim, stating that "I can’t see why I would want to be going back to that old thing. It’s very retrogressive. I want to look forward, and looking back isn’t my joy."[73] is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


On December 10 (UK) & 11th (US) 2007, Pink Floyd released a new CD box set, Oh, By the Way,[74] containing all fourteen studio albums with their newest respective CD remasters, original vinyl artwork plus new artwork from Storm Thorgerson. is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oh, By the Way is a compilation box set by Pink Floyd. ...


Mason and Waters have said that they would be happy to do a Pink Floyd tour, but during the BBC1 Special, "Which One's Pink?," when asked about whether the band would reform, Gilmour ambiguously stated either "Ain't Gonna Happen" or "Anything could happen". Which of these two phrases were said is debatable.[75][76] During the same documentary, Wright stated that he "wouldn't mind playing the Pink Floyd 'music' again," but said nothing solid about reuniting with the actual members.


In a May 2008 interview for BBC 6Music, David Gilmour hinted that he would be in favour of another one-off show, but ruled out a full tour: "Who knows? Who knows the future? I haven't absolutely said 'no' to the possibility but I think that in reality any sort of long-term thing together is not going to happen. We did the one-off thing and that was probably enough for me but we shall see. At my incredibly advantaged age - having achieved this - I've earned the right to sit on my ass for a little while and consider what to do next." [77]


Live performances

Pink Floyd are renowned for their lavish stage shows, combining over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. Pink Floyd are pioneers in the live music experience, renowned for their lavish stage shows that combine over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. ...

Stage lighting on The Division Bell Tour (1994). The latest version of "Mr Screen" featured robotic lights around its circumference.

They have always resisted the temptation of a large screen portraying band members because they "don't really do very much", preferring instead to show music videos to run alongside the songs. Image File history File links PFLive. ... Image File history File links PFLive. ... A music video (also video clip, promo) is a short film or video meant to present a visual representation of a popular music song. ...

Influence

Pink Floyd have influenced progressive rock artists of the 1970s such as Genesis and Yes;[78] and various contemporary artists such as Dream Theater, Tool, Porcupine Tree, Anathema and Nine Inch Nails.[79] Their music plays a featured role in the Tom Stoppard play Rock 'n' Roll.[80] For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ... Tool is an American rock band that was formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California. ... Porcupine Tree is an English progressive rock band formed in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England by Steven Wilson. ... Anathema are an English band from the city of Liverpool, which, together with Paradise Lost and My Dying Bride, helped to develop the death/doom sound, a subgenre of doom metal. ... NIN redirects here. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Rock n Roll is a play by Tom Stoppard that premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 2006. ...


Discography

This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ...

Albums

The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is the second album by rock band Pink Floyd, and arguably one of the first progressive rock albums. ... Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ... Atom Heart Mother is a 1970 (see 1970 in music) progressive rock album by Pink Floyd. ... Alternate cover U.S./Canadian releases cover Meddle is an album by English progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Obscured by Clouds is a rock album by Pink Floyd based on their soundtrack for the French film La Vallée. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... The Final Cut is a rock album by Pink Floyd recorded at several studios in the UK from July to December 1982. ... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ...

DVD and video

Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii is a 1973 Adrian Maben film featuring Pink Floyd performing six songs, at the ruins of the empty ancient amphitheatre in Pompeii, Italy. ... Gerald Scarfes depiction of the wall from Pink Floyd The Wall Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 MGM film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd live double album from the David Gilmour era of the band. ... La Carrera Panamericana is a 1992 video of the Carrera Panamericana automobile race in Mexico. ... P•U•L•S•E (pronounced and sometimes written as Pulse) is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the October 20, 1994 concert at Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, in The Division Bell tour, which is currently available on DVD. There was considerable delay in the release of the...

Personnel

Richard Wright, also known as Rick Wright (born July 28, 1945), is the keyboard player of Pink Floyd. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ...

Former members

Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Rado Bob Klose (born 1944; sometimes referred to as Bob Close or Brian Close in various publications) is a English musician and photographer. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The Times-July 2006
  2. ^ BBC News release 2006
  3. ^ a b RIAA, retrieved 22 April 2006
  4. ^ Pink Floyd online
  5. ^ Infoplease
  6. ^ Mason, p. 21
  7. ^ Schaffner, p. 25
  8. ^ Mason, p. 30
  9. ^ Uncut, September 2006, p. 54
  10. ^ Schaffner, p. 276
  11. ^ (1995) The complete guide to the music of Pink Floyd. London: Omnibus,, 150p.. ISBN 071194301x. 
  12. ^ Schaffner, p. 30
  13. ^ a b c Schaffner, p. 320–321
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j allmusic (((Pink Floyd > Discography > Main Albums))). Retrieved on 2006-02-16.
  15. ^ a b Rolling Stone, 26 October 1968
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Pink Floyd & Co. discography, retrieved 15 February 2006
  17. ^ The Observer, 6 October 2002
  18. ^ Pinnell, B. (1980). Australian Radio Interview, David Gilmour. Retrieved on 2007-08-24.
  19. ^ Schaffner, p. 105
  20. ^ a b Schaffner, p. 107–108
  21. ^ [1], 11 April 2003
  22. ^ Schaffner, p. 146
  23. ^ BBC Music profile, retrieved 25 November 2006
  24. ^ Rolling Stone, 2 December 1970
  25. ^ Schaffner, p. 154
  26. ^ Schaffner, p. 164
  27. ^ BBC..Later with Jools Holland, transcript retrieved here 16 April 2006
  28. ^ Schaffner, p. 163
  29. ^ Rolling Stone, 6 January 1972
  30. ^ Mason, p. 182
  31. ^ a b Schaffner, p. 167
  32. ^ a b Schaffner, p. 183
  33. ^ Rolling Stone, 21 January 1997
  34. ^ Schaffner, p. 171
  35. ^ Mason, p. 213
  36. ^ Schaffner, p. 323
  37. ^ Miles, Pink Floyd unofficial biography
  38. ^ Wright confirmed this on the US rock radio album premiere of Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980-81 in 2000.
  39. ^ Publius FAQ [2]
  40. ^ Gilmour confirmed that he was against Wright's dismissal on the U.S. rock radio album premiere of Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980-81 in 2000
  41. ^ Mason, Nick (2004). Inside Out : A Personal History of Pink Floyd. London: Orion Books, p.245. ISBN 0753819066. 
  42. ^ Schaffner, p. 209
  43. ^ Rolling Stone, 24 March 1977
  44. ^ batterseapowerstation.org.uk, retrieved 11 February 2006
  45. ^ Schaffner, p. 243
  46. ^ Schaffner, p. 236
  47. ^ Rolling Stone, 7 February 1980
  48. ^ RIAA
  49. ^ The Numbers, retrieved 13 February 2006
  50. ^ Rolling Stone, 14 April 1983
  51. ^ Schaffner, p. 257
  52. ^ Prog Archives.com discography, retrieved 12 July 2006
  53. ^ Schaffner, p. 297
  54. ^ Schaffner, p. 289
  55. ^ AMG, retrieved 15 February 2006
  56. ^ Rolling Stone, 16 June 1994
  57. ^ Amazon.co.uk, retrieved 4 July 2006
  58. ^ Official Article
  59. ^ brain-damage.co.uk, 20 July 2005, retrieved 10 July 2006
  60. ^ neptunepinkfloyd.co.uk, 13 November 2003, retrieved 5 July 2007
  61. ^ Donate Live 8 profit says Gilmour BBC News, 5 July 2005. Accessed 2007-04-07.
  62. ^ Video Interview with Nick Mason
  63. ^ a b La Repubblica, 3 February 2006, translation here
  64. ^ Music Week, here
  65. ^ Rolling Stone [3]
  66. ^ Word Magazine, October 2005
  67. ^ Guitar World, April 2006
  68. ^ Waters Willing To Perform Together Again, 1 March 2007
  69. ^ Official site of Pink Floyd [4]
  70. ^ Die Welt, 6 February 2006
  71. ^ Pink Floyd appear at Syd Barrett tribute gig
  72. ^ Roger Waters Interview by Graham Reid: Dark Side of the Moon Concert Auckland
  73. ^ Rolling Stone: Exclusive: David Gilmour Looks Darkly at the Future of Pink Floyd [5]
  74. ^ Brain Damage Pink Floyd Box Set Confirmed For Dec '07 2007-10-13 Accessed: 2007-11-22
  75. ^ Possible Reunion for '08/'09?
  76. ^ Waters And Mason On Board, Pink Floyd Reunion Lies With David Gilmour
  77. ^ NME: Pink Floyd to repeat Live8 reunion? [6]
  78. ^ ClassicRock Pink Floyd by Dave White
  79. ^ Trent Reznor Meets Roger Waters
  80. ^ www.Broadway.TV article, "Stoppard's Rock-N-Roll Connection"

is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other works based on the Pink Floyd album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... For other works based on the Pink Floyd album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Music Week is a trade paper for the UK record industry. ... Two issues of Guitar World featuring Jimmy Page, and Jimi Hendrix on the covers, and the accompanying CDs (May 2005, October 2005) Guitar World is a monthly music magazine devoted to guitarists. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Beech, Mark. The A-Z of Names in Rock, 1998. ISBN 1-86105-059-3
  • Blake, Mark. Pigs Might Fly - The Inside Story of Pink Floyd, 2007. ISBN 1-84513-261-0 and ISBN 978-1-84513-261-3
  • Fitch, Vernon. The Pink Floyd Encyclopedia (3rd edition), 2005. ISBN 1-894959-24-8
  • Jones, Cliff. Another Brick in the Wall: The Stories Behind Every Pink Floyd Song, 1996. ISBN 0-553-06733-8
  • Mason, Nick. Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd, 2004. ISBN 0-297-84387-7 (followed in 2005 by the paperback edition (ISBN 0-7538-1906-6) which features an updated section on the band's Live 8 reunion)
  • 'Miles' and Mabbett, Andy. Pink Floyd : the visual documentary, 1994. ISBN 0-7119-4109-2
  • Palacios, Julian. Lost in the Woods: Syd Barrett and the Pink Floyd, 2001. ISBN 0-7522-2328-3
  • Schaffner, Nicholas. Saucerful of Secrets: The Pink Floyd Odyssey, 1991. ISBN 0-517-57608-2
  • Mabbett, Andy; MacDonald, Bruno; Trueman, Ivor and Walker, Dave (Eds). "The Amazing Pudding", 1982–1992. ISSN 0951-8304 (a fanzine)

Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... Nicholas Schaffner was Singer/Songwriter and author of authoritative books on The Beatles and other British rock groups, including Pink Floyd. ... The Amazing Pudding was a Pink Floyd and Roger Waters fan magazine, founded by Ivor Trueman and published, variously, by him, Andy Mabbett (, Dave Walker and Bruno MacDonald, for ten years (and 60 issues). ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Anderson Council Australian Pink Floyd Show El Monstero Y Los Masked Avengers The Machine The Pink Floyd Experience Think Floyd Wish You Were Here This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The worlds best-selling music artists cannot be listed officially, as there is no organization that has recorded global music sales in the manner that the RIAA does in the United States. ... Dark Side of the Rainbow logo from The Synchronicity Arkive Dark Side of the Rainbow (also known as Dark Side of Oz or The Wizard of Floyd) is the name used to refer to the act of listening to the 1973 Pink Floyd album The Dark Side of the Moon...

External links

Official sites

Other links

  • Another Link on the Wall - A large collection of fan sites, news resources and other external links, updated regularly.

For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Nicholas Berkeley Nick Mason (born January 27, 1944 in Birmingham, England) is the drummer for Pink Floyd. ... Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... Rado Bob Klose (born 1944; sometimes referred to as Bob Close or Brian Close in various publications) is a English musician and photographer. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... A Saucerful of Secrets is the second album by rock band Pink Floyd, and arguably one of the first progressive rock albums. ... Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ... Atom Heart Mother is a 1970 (see 1970 in music) progressive rock album by Pink Floyd. ... Alternate cover U.S./Canadian releases cover Meddle is an album by English progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... The Final Cut is a rock album by Pink Floyd recorded at several studios in the UK from July to December 1982. ... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ... This article is about the Pink Floyd album. ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Tonite Lets All Make Love in London is a 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the swinging London. It features live perfomance by Pink Floyd and footage of John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsburg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine, and many... Zabriskie Point is a soundtrack album to the Michelangelo Antonioni film of the same name. ... Obscured by Clouds is a rock album by Pink Floyd based on their soundtrack for the French film La Vallée. ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Ummagumma is a progressive/psychedelic rock double album by Pink Floyd, released in 1969. ... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd live double album from the David Gilmour-led era of the band which was recorded over five nights at the Nassau Coliseum in Long Island, New York in August 1988 and mixed at Abbey Road Studios in September 1988. ... P•U•L•S•E (pronounced and sometimes written as Pulse) is a live double CD by Pink Floyd, released on May 29, 1995[1], and is considered widely by many fans to be the best live album released by Pink Floyd, despite the departure of former band leader Roger... For other works based on the Pink Floyd album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... -1... A Nice Pair is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... Masters of Rock is a little-known compilation album of early Pink Floyd music, concentrating on singles from 1967 to 1968. ... A Collection of Great Dance Songs is a compilation album by Pink Floyd released against the will of Roger Waters on November 23, 1981 (see 1981 in music) on Harvest/EMI in the UK and Columbia Records in the US originally. ... Works is a Pink Floyd compilation album released in 1983 by their former American label, Capitol Records, to compete with their then-current album The Final Cut. ... Shine On is a nine CD box set by Pink Floyd which was released in 1992 to coincide with Pink Floyds 25th Anniversary as a recording and touring band. ... For Céline Dions album by the same name, see The Early Singles. ... Alternate uses: Echoes (disambiguation) Echoes: The Best of Pink Floyd is a compilation album by Pink Floyd. ... Oh, By the Way is a compilation box set by Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd The Wall is a 1982 film by British director Alan Parker based on the 1979 Pink Floyd album The Wall. ... Delicate Sound of Thunder is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the A Momentary Lapse of Reason concert tour. ... La Carrera Panamericana is a 1992 video of the Carrera Panamericana automobile race in Mexico. ... P•U•L•S•E (pronounced and sometimes written as Pulse) is a Pink Floyd concert video taken from the October 20, 1994 concert at Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, in The Division Bell tour, which is currently available on DVD. There was considerable delay in the release of the... The Pink Floyd and Syd Barrett Story is a documentary released on 24 March 2003 by the BBC as part of the Omnibus series and originally called Syd Barrett: Crazy Diamond. ... London 66-67 is a little-known and unauthorised EP of Pink Floyd music, containing two lost tracks, a longer version of Interstellar Overdrive and Nicks Boogie. These tracks were originally recorded for Peter Whiteheads film Tonite Lets All Make Love In London on January 11 and... This page lists Pink Floyd albums and singles, both official and unofficial, as well as various awards. ... Steve ORourke, Pink Floyd manager and keen racing driver, sadly passed away in Miami, Florida, USA, in October 2003. ... Pink Floyd are pioneers in the live music experience, renowned for their lavish stage shows that combine over-the-top visual experiences with music to create a show in which the performers themselves are almost secondary. ... Pigs are heavily featured in the artwork and stage shows of the progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Dark Side of the Rainbow logo from The Synchronicity Arkive Dark Side of the Rainbow (also known as Dark Side of Oz or The Wizard of Floyd) is the name used to refer to the act of listening to the 1973 Pink Floyd album The Dark Side of the Moon... The official program advertising The Man portion of the shows. ... Give Birth to a Smile is a song written by Roger Waters, performed by Pink Floyd, from Waters and Ron Geesins album Music from The Body. All the Pink Floyd members play in the song although they are not mentioned in the album booklet. ... {{ Album infobox | | Name = Music from The Body | Type = LP/CD | Artist = Roger Waters | Cover = Roger_Waters_The_Body. ... The Division Bell album cover The Publius Enigma is a puzzle connected with Pink Floyds 1994 album The Division Bell. ... 19367 Pink Floyd is a minor planet that has been named in honor of the English musical group Pink Floyd. ...


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