FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Pindar" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pindar

Pindar (or Pindarus, Greek: Πίνδαρος) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was a Greek lyric poet. Of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, Pindar is the one whose work is best preserved, and some critics since antiquity have regarded him as the greatest.[1] A number of military citadels exist under central London, dating mostly from the Second World War and the Cold War. ... A number of military citadels exist under central London, dating mostly from the Second World War and the Cold War. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC Events 529 BC - Cambyses II succeeds his father Cyrus as ruler of Persia. ... Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC Years: 448 BC 447 BC 446 BC 445 BC 444 BC - 443 BC - 442 BC 441 BC... This article is about the city in Greece. ... The nine lyric poets (nine melic poets) were a canon of archaic Greek composers esteemed by the scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria as worthy of critical study. ...

Contents

Biography and works

Pindar was born at Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia. He was the son of Daiphantus and Cleodice. The traditions of his family have left their impression on his poetry, and are not without importance for a correct estimate of his relation to his contemporaries. The clan of the Aegidae – tracing their line from the hero Aegeus – belonged to the Cadmean element of Thebes, i.e., to the elder nobility whose supposed date went back to the days of the founder Cadmus. Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... In Greek mythology, Aegeus, also Aigeus, Aegeas or Aigeas, was the father of Theseus and an Athenian King. ... Cadmus Sowing the Dragons teeth, by Maxfield Parrish, 1908 Caddmus, or Kadmos (Greek: Κάδμος), in Greek mythology, was the son of the king of Phoenicia (Modern day Lebanon) and brother of Europa. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ...


Employing himself by writing choral works in praise of notable personages, events and princes, his house in Thebes was spared by Alexander the Great in recognition of the complimentary works composed for king Alexander I of Macedon. For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Alexander I was ruler of Macedon from 495 BC to 450 BC. He was the son of Amyntas I of Macedon. ...


Pindar composed choral songs of several types. According to a Late Antique biographer, these works were grouped into seventeen books by scholars at the Library of Alexandria. They were, by genre:[2] Late Antiquity is a rough periodization used by historians and other scholars to describe the interval between high Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages in Europe and the Mediterranean world - between the decline of the western Roman Empire from the 3rd century AD onward, to the resurgence of the West... Inscription regarding Tiberius Claudius Balbilus of Rome (d. ...

  • 1 book of humnoi "hymns"
  • 1 book of paianes "paeans"
  • 2 books of dithuramboi "dithyrhambs"
  • 2 book of prosodia "preludes"
  • 3 books of parthenia "songs for maidens"
  • 2 book of huporchemata "songs to support dancing"
  • 1 book of enkomia "praise-songs"
  • 1 book of threnoi "laments"
  • 4 books of epinikia "victory odes"

Of this vast and varied corpus, only the victory odes survive in complete form; the rest are known to us only by quotations in other ancient authors or papyrus scraps unearthed in Egypt. An Athenian comic playwright, Eupolis, is said to have remarked that the poems of Pindar "are already reduced to silence by the disinclination of the multitude for elegant learning"[3] and it may be suggested that in modern times, too, Pindar is more respected than read. A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a god or other religiously significant figure. ... Paean, in Homer, was the Greek physician of the gods. ... The dithyramb was originally an ancient Greek hymn sung to the god Dionysus. ... For other uses, see Papyrus (disambiguation). ... Eupolis (ca. ...


The victory odes were composed for aristocratic victors in the four most prominent athletic festivals in early Classical Greece: the Olympian, Pythian, Isthmian and Nemean Games. Rich and allusive in style, they are packed with dense parallels between the athletic victor, his illustrious ancestors, and the myths of gods and heroes underlying the athletic festival. But "Pindar's power does not lie in the pedigrees of ... athletes, ... or the misbehavior of minor deities. It lies in a splendour of phrase and imagery that suggests the gold and purple of a sunset sky."[4] Two of Pindar's most famous victory odes are Olympian 1 and Pythian 1. Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Parthenon This article is on the term Classical Greece itself. ... Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ... View of the stadium of the Delphi sanctuary, used for the Pythian Games. ... The Isthmian Games were one of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, and were held at Corinth every two years. ... The Nemean Games were one of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, and were held at Nemea every two years. ... Allusion is a figure of speech, in which one refers covertly or indirectly to an object or circumstance that has occurred or existed in an external content. ...


In keeping with the Theban pedagogic tradition, a good part of his poetry touches on pederastic themes. Among these are his Olympian Odes I and IX, as well as his paean to the eromenos Theoxenus, a skolion thought to have been dedicated to Pindar's own beloved, but now believed to have been commissioned by Theoxenus' lover. (Hubbard, Thomas K. Pindar, Theoxenus, and the Homoerotic Eye)[5] Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... In the pederastic tradition of Classical Athens, the eromenos (Greek ἐρόμενος, pl. ... Skolion (pl. ...


Pindar is to be conceived, then, as standing within the circle of those families for whom the heroic myths were domestic records. He had a personal link with the memories which everywhere were most cherished by Dorians, no less than with those which appealed to men of "Cadmean" or of Achaean stock. And the wide ramifications of the Aegidae throughout Hellas rendered it peculiarly fitting that a member of that illustrious clan should celebrate the glories of many cities in verse which was truly Panhellenic. [[Im Category: ... This article is about the ancient people of the Achaeans. ... Greece, formally called the Hellenic Republic (Greek: Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), is a country in the southeast of Europe on the southern tip of the Balkan peninsula. ...


Pindar is said to have received lessons in aulos-playing from one Scopelinus at Thebes, and afterwards to have studied at Athens under the musicians Apollodorus (or Agathocles) and Lasus of Hermione. Several passages in Pindar's extant odes glance at the long technical development of Greek lyric poetry before his time, and at the various elements of art which the lyricist was required to temper into a harmonious whole. The facts that stand out from these meagre traditions are that Pindar was precocious and laborious. Preparatory labour of a somewhat severe and complex kind was, indeed, indispensable for the Greek lyric poet of that age. A nude youth plays the aulos at a banquet: Attic red-figure cup by the Euaion Painter, ca. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... For the grindcore band, see Agathocles (band) Agathocles (361 BC - 289 BC), tyrant of Syracuse (317 BC - 289 BC) and king of Sicily (304 BC - 289 BC). ... Lasus of Hermione was a Greek lyric poet of the 6th century BC. He is known to have been active at Athens under the reign of the Peisistratids. ... For other uses, see Ode (disambiguation). ... Lyric poetry is the purest form of poetry, which does not attempt to tell a story, as do epic poetry and dramatic poetry. ...


Pindar's wife's name was Megacleia, and he had a son named Daiphantus and two daughters, Eumetis and Protomache. He is said to have died at Argos, at the age of seventy-nine, in 443 BC. This article is about the city in Greece. ...


Chronology of the Odes

Modern editors (e.g. Snell and Maehler in their Teubner edition), have assigned dates, securely or tentatively, to Pindar's victory odes, based on ancient sources and other grounds. (Doubt is indicated by a question mark immediately following the number of an ode in the list below.) The result is a fairly clear chronological outline of Pindar's career as an epinician poet: The covers of Bibliotheca Teubneriana Greek texts through the years: Philodemi De ira liber, ed. ...

  • 498 BC: Pythian Odes 10
  • 490 BC: Pythian Odes 6, 12
  • 488 BC: Olympian Odes 14 (?)
  • 485 BC: Nemean Odes 2 (?), 7 (?)
  • 483 BC: Nemean Odes 5 (?)
  • 486 BC: Pythian Odes 7
  • 480 BC: Isthmian Odes 6
  • 478 BC: Isthmian Odes 5 (?); Isthmian Odes 8
  • 476 BC: Olympian Odes 1, 2, 3, 11; Nemean Odes 1 (?)
  • 475 BC: Pythian Odes 2 (?); Nemean Odes 3 (?)
  • 474 BC: Olympian Odes 10 (?); Pythian Odes 3 (?), 9, 11; Nemean Odes 9 (?)
  • 474/473 BC: Isthmian Odes 3/4 (?)
  • 473 BC: Nemean Odes 4 (?)
  • 470 BC: Pythian Odes 1; Isthmian Odes 2 (?)
  • 468 BC: Olympian Odes 6
  • 466 BC: Olympian Odes 9, 12
  • 465 BC: Nemean Odes 6 (?)
  • 464 BC: Olympian Odes 7, 13
  • 462 BC: Pythian Odes 4
  • 462/461 BC: Pythian Odes 5
  • 460 BC: Olympian Odes 8
  • 459 BC: Nemean Odes 8 (?)
  • 458 BC: Isthmian Odes 1 (?)
  • 460 BC or 456 BCE: Olympian Odes 4 (?), 5 (?)
  • 454 BC: Isthmian Odes 7 (?)
  • 446 BC: Pythian Odes 8; Nemean Odes 11 (?)
  • 444 BC: Nemean Odes 10 (?)

This article is in need of attention. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC - 490 BC - 489 BC 488 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC 490 BC 489 BC - 488 BC - 487 BC 486 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 490 BC 489 BC 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC - 485 BC - 484 BC - 483 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC 484 BC - 483 BC - 482 BC 481 BC... Centuries: 6th century BCE - 5th century BCE - 4th century BCE Decades: 530s BCE 520s BCE 510s BCE 500s BCE 490s BCE - 480s BCE - 470s BCE 460s BCE 450s BCE 420s BCE 430s BCE Years: 491 BCE 490 BCE 489 BCE 488 BCE 487 BCE - 486 BCE - 485 BCE 484 BCE... The Persian invasion of Greece in 480-479 BC May — King Xerxes I of Persia marches from Sardis and onto Thrace and Macedonia. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 483 BC 482 BC 481 BC 480 BC 479 BC - 478 BC - 477 BC 476 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 481 BC 480 BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC _ 476 BC _ 475 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC Years: 480 BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC - 475 BC - 474 BC 473 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC - 474 BC - 473 BC 472 BC 471... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 479 BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC - 474 BC - 473 BC 472 BC 471... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC 474 BC 473 BC 472 BC 471 BC 470... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 478 BC 477 BC 476 BC 475 BC 474 BC 473 BC 472 BC 471 BC 470... Suspected of plotting to seize power in Sparta by instigating a helot uprising, Pausanias takes refuge in the Temple of Athena of the Brazen House to escape arrest. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 473 BC 472 BC 471 BC 470 BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 471 BC 470 BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC - 466 BC - 465 BC 464 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 470 BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC - 465 BC - 464 BC 463 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465 BC - 464 BC - 463 BC 462 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 467 BC 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC - 462 BC - 461 BC 460 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 467 BC 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC - 462 BC - 461 BC 460 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC Years: 466 BC 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC - 461 BC - 460 BC 459 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC - 460 BC - 459 BC 458 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC 460 BC - 459 BC - 458 BC 457 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC 460 BC 459 BC - 458 BC - 457 BC 456 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 465 BC 464 BC 463 BC 462 BC 461 BC - 460 BC - 459 BC 458 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 461 BC 460 BC 459 BC 458 BC 457 BC - 456 BC - 455 BC 454 BC... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 459 BC 458 BC 457 BC 456 BC 455 BC - 454 BC - 453 BC 452 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC Years: 451 BC 450 BC 449 BC 448 BC 447 BC - 446 BC - 445 BC 444 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC Years: 449 BC 448 BC 447 BC 446 BC 445 BC - 444 BC - 443 BC 442 BC...

Notes

  1. ^ Quintilian 10.1.61; cf. Pseudo-Longinus 33.5.
  2. ^ M.M. Willcock: Pindar: Victory Odes (p. 3). Cambridge UP, 1995.
  3. ^ Noted in Deipnosophistae, epitome of book I.
  4. ^ Lucas, F. L.. Greek Poetry for Everyman. Macmillan Company, New York, p. 262. 
  5. ^ 1.85-1.87 Pindar. Homosexuality in Greece and Rome: a sourcebook of basic documents in translation. Retrieved on 2006-05-20.

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. ... Longinus (Λογγινος) is a conventional name applied to a Greek teacher of rhetoric or a literary critic who may have lived in the first or third century CE. Longinus is known only for his treatise On the Sublime (Περι υψους), a work which focuses on the effect of good writing (Russell xlii). ... The Deipnosophistes (deipnon “dinner” and sophistae, “the wise ones”) is variously translated as The Banquet of the Learned or Philosophers at Dinner or The Gastronomers is work of some 15 books (some complete and some surviving in summaries only) by the ancient Greek author Athenaeus of Naucratis in Egypt, written... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Bundy, Elroy L. [1962] (2006). Studia Pindarica (PDF), digital version, Berkeley, California: Department of Classics, University of California, Berkeley. Retrieved on 2007-02-12. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Perseus Project is a digital library project of Tufts University that assembles digital collections of humanities resources. ... Basil Lanneau Gildersleeve (October 23, 1831 _ January 9, 1924), American classical scholar, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, son of Benjamin Gildersleeve (1791-1875), a Presbyterian evangelist, and editor of the Charleston Christian Observer in 1826-1845, of the in 1845-1856, and of The Central Presbyterian in 1856...

Nine Lyric Poets | Ancient Greek Literature
Alcman | Sappho | Alcaeus | Anacreon | Stesichorus | Ibycus | Simonides | Pindar | Bacchylides

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. The nine lyric poets (nine melic poets) were a canon of archaic Greek composers esteemed by the scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria as worthy of critical study. ... Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in the Greek language until the 4th century AD. // Wikisource has original text related to this article: an essay on the transition to written literature in Greece This period of Greek literature stretches from Homer until the 4th century BC and the rise... Alcman (also Alkman, Greek ) (7th century BC) was an Ancient Greek choral lyric poet from Sparta. ... Ancient Greek bust. ... Alcaeus (Alkaios) of Mitylene (ca. ... Anacreon (born ca. ... Stesichorus (, lit. ... Ibycus (), of Rhegium in Italy, Greek lyric poet, contemporary of Anacreon, flourished in the 6th century BC. He was included in the canonical list of nine lyric poets by the scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria. ... Bold textil8jjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjpooSimonides of Ceos (ca. ... Bacchylides, Ancient Greek lyric poet, was born at Iulis, in the island of Ceos. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pindar: multi channel publishing and communications organisation (89 words)
Harnessing the finest local expertise and talent around the world
Learn more about Pindar's high profile sports marketing initiatives,ocean racing team, corporate sailing and charter activities.
The Pindar group of companies, Thornburgh Rd, Eastfield, Scarborough, North Yorkshire YO11 3UY
Pindar: Sports sponsorship, yacht chartering and corporate hospitality (375 words)
Pindar is committed to building two brands: Pindar and AlphaGraphics, each made visible through Pindar's high-profile sports marketing initiatives.
Pindar's sporting strategy focuses on the people – their exceptional personalities, their values and approach to life.
Ian Williams, a relative newcomer to Pindar is currently dominating the World Match Racing sailing series.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m