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Encyclopedia > Pin (professional wrestling)

A pinfall, a pin, or a fall (the first term most commonly used in professional wrestling) is a victory condition in various forms of wrestling that is met by holding an opponent's shoulders on the wrestling mat for a prescribed period of time. For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift Womens wrestling Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... This article is about the pin as it is defined in amateur wrestling. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... This article is about the body part. ...

Contents

Pinning also refers to the pinning of hands during close hand-to-hand combat of Wing Chun. Wing Chun, occasionally romanized as Ving Tsun or Wing Tsun (literally spring chant and alternatively as forever spring, or substituted with the character for eternal springtime[1]) is a Chinese martial art that specializes in aggressive close-range combat. ...


In professional wrestling, a pinfall is a common method of winning a match and typically must be held for a count of three by the referee (though the staged and entertainment-based nature of the sport makes this a somewhat ephemeral requirement). For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... In professional wrestling, a work is slang for a staged event (that is, one that enforces kayfabe). ...


The purpose of a pinning maneuver is to hold the opponents shoulders against the mat for a count of three. The count is broken (a near-fall) if the opponent manages to raise one or both of his shoulders off of the mat, usually by kicking out -- throwing their legs up to cause their shoulders to rise from the mat. In some positions, a wrestler may bridge, arching their back so that only their feet and the top of their head are touching the ground, to put more of their weight on the pinning opponent or to prop them up. In the context of professional wrestling, a near-fall occurs when a wrestlers shoulders are pinned to the mat for a count of two, but the wrestler manages to escape before the referees hand hits the mat a third time, which would signify a pinfall. ...


Sometimes, an attacking wrestler may (illegally) hook the opponents tights for extra leverage. Another popular illegal tactic of heel wrestlers is to attempt a pin close to the ring ropes so they can prop their legs up on the ropes to either gain additional leverage or put more weight on the opponent. In professional wrestling, a heel is a villain character. ...


Types of pinfalls

Back slide

The attacking wrestler stands back-to-back with their opponent and hooks both of the opponent's arms. They then lean forward and drops to their knees, sliding the opponent down their back so that their shoulders are against the mat and their chin is against their chest. The attacker holds the opponents arms down with their own arms for the pin.


Cover

Also known as a lateral press, cross press or simply as the basic pin. With an opponent lying face-up on the mat, the attacking wrestler lies face-down across the opponent's chest to hold them down. Sometimes, when both wrestlers are (kayfabe) exhausted or badly hurt the attacking wrestler will cover with just an arm or lie down face up rather than face down. In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb; IPA: ) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is the portrayal of professional wrestling as not staged or worked. ...


The term floatover (when in reference to a pin) refers to an attacking wrestler using the momentum of a throw or slam they are performing to propel themselves over the opponent into the lateral press position.


Cradle

The attacking wrestler lies across the opponents chest and hooks a leg with the arm on the opposite side (left leg with right arm or right leg with left arm). Holding the leg gives the attacker greater leverage and makes it harder for the opponent to kick out. This was derived from the inside cradle and outside cradle in amateur wrestling.


Crucifix

An attacking wrestler hooks the arms of an opponent, one by grapevining their legs around it, and the other using their arms. This positions the attacking wrestler horizontally across the back of the opponent and forced the opponent's arms out like a crucifixion. The attacking wrestler then lowers their bodyweight so that the opponent is brought drown to the mat backwards and is forced on to his own shoulders in a pinning position with his legs in the air. Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ...


A variation on the standard crucifix, the Crucifix bomb, or Crucifix driver sees an attacking wrestler violently force their bodyweight downwards to throw the opponent into the mat with greater impact.


These moves are not to be confused with the Crucifix hold or its powerbomb counterpart. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents. ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Delfin Clutch

The Delfin Clutch, named and innovated by Super Delfin, has an attacking wrestler crossing the arms of the opponent across their own chest while they're laying on their back on the mat. The attacking wrestler then kneels down on one knee on the opponents arms, pinning the opponents shoulders down to the mat. The attacking wrestler then grabs the opponents legs, crosses them, and places them under one of their armpits, bending the opponent to a pinning predicament. Hiroto Wakita is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently runs Osaka Pro Wrestling, and is also working as a wrestler there. ...


Gedo Clutch

The Gedo Clutch, named, popularized and innovated by Gedo has an attacking wrestler sit kneeling on the back of an opponent who is laying face down and facing the same way. The attacking wrestler then grabs the opponents arms and lifts them over their thighs, similar to a camel clutch. The attacker then grabs hold of the opponents head and pushes it down and forward between his legs, while leaning himself forward onto his stomach, flipping the opponent over onto their shoulders, with the attackers legs pinning the opponent down to the mat. This hold is technically known as a double leg nelson. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents. ...


Jackknife hold

The hold has the opponent wrestler laying on their back. The attacking wrestler then lifts the opponents legs and places their head between them while holding them with their arms. The attacking wrestler then flips forward over the opponent planting their feet on the mat and bridging back to add leverage.


La magistral

Also referred to as la casita or as bandito, this move's technical name is arm wrench inside cradle pin and it is performed with the opponent on their hands and knees. From this position, the attacking wrestler stands next to the opponents hip, grabs one arm and applies an armbar. The attacking wrestler then steps over the arm with his inside leg so that he is facing away from the opponent. The attacking wrestler continues his turning motion and dives forward over the opponent, rolling onto their side. The barred arm acts as a lever, flipping the opponent over the attacker and onto their back. The attacker hooks one or both legs as the opponent goes over and holds for the pin. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents. ...


Oklahoma roll

The attacking wrestler stands to the side of his opponent, who is on their hands and knees. The attacker hooks one arm around the opponents neck and one between the legs, and rolls over the opponent. The attacker lands on his back or side, and the opponent is flipped so that their shoulders are pressed against the mat.


Prawn hold

Similar to a rana, except that the attacking wrestler is standing, bent over the opponent with both legs hooked pressing his weight down. This pin is typically the result of a powerbomb. Toshiaki Kawada, who learned the original move from Genichiro Tenryu, later innovated a variation where he slides forward and lifts his legs off the mat, putting his full body weight on top of the wrestler and thus pinning their shoulders more firmly against the mat. A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ... Toshiaki Kawada ) is a professional wrestler who is most known for his work in All Japan Pro Wrestling. ... Genichiro Tenryu (天龍源一郎 Tenryū Genichirō), real name Genichiro Shimada (嶋田源一郎 Shimada Genichirō, born February 2, 1950), is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


Roll-up

The attacking wrestler rolls their opponent back so that the opponents legs are above their head. The attacker wraps his/her arms around the legs and presses down to pin the shoulders.


The most common type of roll up is the school boy where the attacking wrestler drops down behind the opponent and puts one arm up between the opponent's legs to pull the opponent over the attacking wrestler so that they fall flat on their back. At this point, the attacking wrestler would stack the fallen opponent on their shoulders for the pin. Often when female wrestlers use this move, commentators will refer to it as a school girl.


The roll-up is often used to pick up sneaky wins due to it being performed from behind an opponent at anytime. The roll-up is also a popular pinfall move for heel wrestlers, who often secure the hold by using the ropes, or pull on the opponent's tights, for leverage. In professional wrestling, a heel is a villain character. ...


Sitout pin

The attacking wrestler sits down with the legs of the opponent hooked over their shoulders so that the legs and lower body of the opponent are elevated while their shoulders and upper back are in contact with the mat. The arms of the opponent are sometimes pinned beneath the legs of the attacker. This hold results from numerous throws, including the sitout powerbomb, the spin-out powerbomb, and the sunset flip. Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents. ...


Small package

The Small package or Inside Cradle is a pinning maneuver where the attacking wrestler applies a front facelock on the opponent, falls backwards while turning, hooking the opponents far leg with their legs and the opponents other leg with their free arm, ending up on top of the opponent, pinning their shoulders against the mat. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents. ...


Rana

The technical term for the pinning position which results from a sunset flip or a hurricanrana. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents. ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ...


In the Sunset flip version the opponent is laying shoulders down on the mat, almost completely flat on their back, with the attacking wrestler applying the pin sits below the legs of the opponent and uses their own legs to cover the opponents shoulders or arms, and hooks both legs around the thighs to force their weight down to the mat.


The other variation which usually results from a hurricanrana sees the one performing the hurricanrana sit on the opponents chest and hook the opponents legs behind them whilst hooking their arms with their legs. This variation is the same hold just with the attacking wrestler on top.


This interchangeability often sees a spot where the wrestlers change their weight distribution to move from one pinning hold to the other for a succession of near falls. In professional wrestling, a spot is a pre-planned move, which is designed to get a particular audience reaction or determine the pace of the match. ...


Victory roll

Also known as the Mexican Rolling Clutch Pin. The attacking wrestler jumps onto their opponents shoulders from behind and rolls forward. As the attacker flips over, they hook the opponents shoulders with their legs, flipping the opponent over onto their shoulders. The attacker hooks both of the opponents legs to hold them in place for the pin.


References

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leslie Alan Malady was born on October 28, 1940 in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...

See also

  • Near-fall

 
 

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