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Encyclopedia > Piledriver (professional wrestling)

A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his opponent, turns him upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponent's head into the mat. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ...


The most common piledrivers are the basic belly-to-back, or Texas piledriver, and the belly-to-belly tombstone piledriver popularized by The Undertaker, but many more intricate variants are in use. For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ...


Piledrivers are generally considered to be one of the more dangerous maneuvers in wrestling because of the impact on the head and compression of the neck; if even slightly botched, the move can cause serious injury, even paralysis. A standard kayfabe piledriver properly done has the head barely touching the ground, if at all. To botch in professional wrestling means to attempt a move that does not come out as the wrestler wanted it to come out. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ...


A standard piledriver is banned in World Wrestling Entertainment, although they are still used on rare occasions. The Undertaker's tombstone piledriver, however, is not.[1] It is also considered an automatic disqualification in pro wrestling matches held in Memphis, Tennessee, as the move is banned in that city. (Ironically Jerry Lawler, a wrestler and promoter in that city, uses a piledriver as one of his finishing moves.) In some promotions in the United Kingdom, the move can result in not only a disqualification, but a fine. In Mexico, the piledriver (called a Martinete) is an automatic disqualification and wrestlers usually act as if their neck is broken. A Martinete generally refers to the tombstone piledriver and/or its variations, but it is also used for other variations. World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... FINE was created in 1998 and is an informal association of the four main Fair Trade networks: F Fairtrade Labelling Organizations International (FLO) I International Fair Trade Association (IFAT) N Network of European Worldshops (NEWS!) and E European Fair Trade Association (EFTA) // The aim of FINE is to enable these...

Contents

Variations

Argentine piledriver

The move is executed from a Argentine backbreaker rack (face up, with the neck and one leg cradled) position. The wrestler pushes the opponent forward while holding the opponent's leg with one arm, and the head with the other arm, and then sits down, driving the opponent head first down to the floor. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


This move was popularized by Super Dragon under the name the Psycho Driver. He also occasionally draped the arm of the opponent across the opponent's neck and held it in place while he delivered the move. // Super Dragon (born Daniel Lyon) began wrestling in 1997. ...


Canadian Piledriver

This move is executed by having the opponent up in a canadian backbreaker rack. Then the wrestler will pull down the opponent by hooking the opponent's chin and driving the opponents head into the mat while falling into a sitout position. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Innovated by Chris Hamrick. Chris Hamrick is an American professional wrestler. ...


Back to belly piledriver

The wrestler faces the opponent, places his head between the hold of them. He then stands up, lifting the opponent upside down. The wrestler then either sits down or drops on to his knees, driving the opponent's head down to the mat. Innovated by Takao Omori who calls this move the Axe Guillotine Driver. Takao Ōmori (大森隆男; Ōmori Takao) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


A variation on this which is sometimes known as the Sunset Driver sees the attacking wrestler hook the opponent's legs underneath his / her arms while holding the opponent up in the back to belly position. From here, the wrestler drops to his / her knees, driving the opponent's head into the mat. This move will often see the attacking wrestler hold the move after landing for a rana style pinfall attempt. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Kryptonite Krunch

The Kryptonite Krunch begins with the wrestler facing his opponent. From there, the wrestler will pick up the opponent and place them over his / her shoulder so that the opponent's head is dangling over the wrestler's back by the waist of the wrestler. The wrestler then holds the opponent in place by holding his / her leg with one arm and applies a headlock to the opponent with his / her other arm. The opponent is now bent into a circle. The wrestler then drops to a seated position, driving the head of the opponent into the ground.


The move was utilized nationally across the United States most often under the name Kryptonite Krunch by Nova, although it has been done for years under many other names like the Reality Check as used by Michael Modest and the Schwein as used by CIMA. Michael Bucci (born June 5, 1972) is an American professional wrestler. ... Micheal Cirigilo , born July 19, 1971 in San Francisco, California is a professional wrestler who currently runs the Pro Wrestling IRON promotion and wrestling school, and wrestles also for Pro Wrestling NOAH, and Ultimate Pro Wrestling. ... Nobuhiko Oshima, better known by his stage name CIMA (pronounced Shima), is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently wrestles for Dragon Gate. ...


Another method used when performing this over the shoulder piledriver sees the attacking wrestler lift the opponent over one shoulder but bring him / her across the wrestler's back and place the opponent's head under the other arm. This version is best known as Mariko Yoshida's Air Raid Crash, a name which is often wrongly used when referring to the Kryptonite Krunch. Dave Finlay uses this version as his finisher, calling it the Celtic Cross. Colt Cabana uses a neckbreaker variation of the position of the air raid crash where he drops down to a kneeling position, and lands the opponent onto his knee. Mariko Yoshida (吉田万里子, born February 15, 1970 in Hiroshima) is a professional wrestler best known for her work with the ARSION wrestling promotion, where she was also head trainer. ... David Edward Dave Finlay (born October 20, 1958) is a British/Northern Irish professional wrestler and road agent. ... Scott Colton (born May 6, 1980 in Deerfield, Illinois), better known under his ring name Classic Colt Cabana, is a professional wrestler, currently working in Ring of Honor and on the independent circuit. ... In professional wrestling a neckbreaker is any throw or slam that focuses its attack on the opponent’s neck. ...


Cradle piledriver

The Cradle Piledriver, largely popularized byJerry Lynn as his finisher, is a variation on standard piledrivers which sees the attacking wrestler grapevine the opponents leg with their arm. Jeremy Jerry Lynn (born June 12, 1963) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW), the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) and Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA). ...


The most common of which is similar to a Texas piledriver and was popularized by the legendary wrestler Karl Gotch. This move sees the attacking wrestler, from a position in which the opponent is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, reach around the opponent's midsection and lifting them so that they are held upside down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, the wrestler then hooks his / her arms around one leg of the opponent before dropping to a sitting or kneeling position with the opponent's head falling between the wrestler's thighs down to the mat. Categories: American professional wrestlers | Professional wrestling stubs ...


This variant can be used on other types of piledriver; most notably the Cradle tombstone piledriver variation, instead of wrapping both of his arms around the waist of the opponent, the wrestler wraps one arm around the waist and places his other arm between the opponent's legs, grabbing hold of his other arm. The wrestler then drops down on his knees, driving the opponent down to the mat head first.


Cross-arm piledriver

From a position in which the opponent is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, the attacking wrestler crosses the arms of this opponent for a straightjacket hold on the prone opponent before then lifting the opponent up into a vertical position and driving them down between the attacking wrestler's legs. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Double underhook piledriver

In this piledriver a wrestler will bend his / her opponent forward, placing the opponent's head between the wrestler's legs (a standing head scissors), and hooks each of the opponent's arms behind the opponent's back. He / she then pulls back on the opponent's arms lifting him/her up so that the opponent is held upside down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, the wrestler then drops to a sitting or kneeling position dropping the opponent's head into the mat.


The version which sees the attacking wrestler fall to a seated position was popular with several wrestlers based around independent promotions on the west coast of the United States, where it is known as the Tiger Driver '98.-1...


Flip piledriver

The move which is also referred to as a front flip piledriver begins in a position in which the opponent is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, the wrestler grabs around his / her opponent's midsection latching onto the opponent's back, with his / her head to one side of the opponent's hips, keeping his / her legs around the opponent's head. From this position the wrestler pushes off the mat with his / her legs to flip the opponent over.


As both wrestlers flip the attacking wrestler uses his / her body weight to land in a seated position driving the opponent's head down to the mat between the wrestler's thighs. It is most famously used by Petey Williams as the Canadian Destroyer. Petey Williams (born August 26, 1981) is a Canadian professional wrestler. ...


A double underhook variation exists in which the arms of a bent over opponent are placed in a butterfly prior to performing the flip. This move was innovated by Jake Crist, who calls it the Suicide Attempt. Jake often performs this variation off the top turnbuckle. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ...


Package Piledriver

A Package piledriver is almost the same as a Texas piledriver, but instead of grabbing the waist of the opponent, the wrestler puts their arms underneath the opponent's arms and grabs their legs by the knees. The wrestler then stands up, lifting the opponent until they are upside down, and drops to a sitting position with the opponent's head between their thighs.


An arm butterfly variation has been popularized lately by independent wrestler Kevin Steen. Japanese female wrestler Aja Kong can be seen using it at least a decade ago, notably in her classic match with Manami Toyota on March 26, 1995 in All Japan Women's Pro-Wrestling (Zenjo). Kevin Steen is a Canadian professional wrestler. ... Erika Shishido is a professional wrestler, better known by the stage name Aja Kong, and the founder of the ARSION all-women professional wrestling promotion. ... Manami Toyota(豊田真奈美) is a professional wrestler best known for her work with the All Japan Womens Pro-Wrestling wrestling promotion. ... All Japan Womens Pro-Wrestling (全日本女子プロレス, Zennihon Joshi Puroresu), nicknamed Zenjo (全女: 全 meaning All, 女 meaning Woman) is a joshi puroresu (womens professional wrestling) promotion established in 1968 by Takashi Matsunaga and his brothers. ...


Reverse piledriver

Also known by the term belly-to-belly piledriver, a wrestler first stands facing an opponent before then grab the opponent's waist and turns them upside-down, holding them against their torso. The wrestler then jumps up and drops down to a seated position, driving the opponent's head down to the mat between the wrestler's thighs.


The wrestler may also place the opponent on over his shoulder and fall to a seated position, driving the opponent's head to the mat between his legs. This move is often known by the name Fire Thunder, or Fire Thunder Driver as named by Mr. Gannosuke.


Mike Quackenbush innovated a cross-legged variation, named the Quackendriver II, which sees him after positioning his opponent in the belly to belly position lift one of his arms up and cross the opponents legs over each other and bend them downwards. While holding the opponents legs in this position he falls to a sitting position. Profile Mike Quackenbush (born Michael Spillane, March 18, 1976) is the owner of Chikara Pro Wrestling. ...


Another variation used by AJPW wrestler TARU sees the opponent lifted into a reverse piledriver how ever before he drops down he spins 360 degrees and then drops the opponents head int the mat.


Pumphandle reverse piledriver

This variation sees an attacking wrestler first lock an opponent in the pumphandle hold before then using the hold to raise the opponent up over the shoulder of the attacking wrestler. From here the attacking wrestler brings the opponent down into the belly-to-belly position before then sitting down for a reverse piledriver with the opponent's head impacting the mat between the legs of the attacking wrestler. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Delirious performs a double pumphandle reverse piledriver, named the Chemical Imbalance II, in which he stands behind a bent over opponent and threads both of the opponent's arms between their legs. He then grabs both of the opponent's wrists with both hands and lifts up, forcing the opponent to flip forward. The opponent then lands on their head in the piledriver while Delirious falls to a sitout position. William Hunter Johnston[1][2], better known by his ring name Delirious is an American professional wrestler currently wrestling on the independent circuit, most notably in Ring of Honor. ...

The Undertaker hitting the Tombstone Piledriver on Ric Flair.
The Undertaker hitting the Tombstone Piledriver on Ric Flair.

For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ...

Tombstone Piledriver

This variation of a belly-to-belly piledriver refers to any belly-to-belly piledriver that involves the wrestler holding the opponent in a belly-to-belly position, then falling to a kneeling position.


The name "Tombstone Piledriver" was popularized by The Undertaker, and later Kane. However, the move had been used under that name by other wrestlers many years beforehand. Justin Credible currently uses a spinning variation named That's Incredible! For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Glen Thomas Jacobs (born April 26, 1967) better known by his ring name Kane, is an American professional wrestler. ... Peter Joseph (P.J.) Polaco (born October 16, 1973) is an American professional wrestler. ...


Reverse tombstone piledriver

Variation of the Spike piledriver, instead of dropping to a kneeling position the wrestler drops to a sitting position.


Scoop side piledriver

Facing his opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with their right arm and reaches around the opponent's neck from the same side with their left arm. They then lift the opponent up on their chest so that they are facing downwards. The wrestler then moves their left arm from around the opponent's neck to around the opponent's torso. They then turn the opponent so that they are upside down on one side of the wrestler. The wrestler then jumps up and falls down to a sitting position, driving the opponent down to the mat neck and shoulder first.


Scoop slam piledriver

Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between his opponent's legs with their right arm and reaches around the opponent's neck from the same side with their left arm. They then lift the opponent up and turn them around so that they are held upside down, as in a Scoop slam. The wrestler then drops down to their knees, driving the opponent down to the mat neck and shoulder first. Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ...


Steve Corino uses a slight variation of this move where he first lifts the opponent up to a Fireman's carry. From that position Corino swings the opponent to his front with the move continuing like a regular Scoop slam piledriver.This is the Samoan driver. Steven Eugene (Steve) Corino (born May 29, 1973 in Winnipeg, Manitoba) is a Canadian professional wrestler, currently working for Pro Wrestling ZERO1-MAX and numerous independent promotions. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ...


Spike piledriver

A spike piledriver can refer to either jumping piledriver, aided piledriver, or reverse tombstone piledriver. Double-team maneuvers in professional wrestling are when two wrestlers work together to attack an opponent, these moves are mainly used by tag teams in tag matches. ...


Texas piledriver

Also called a traditional piledriver, or simply piledriver, this is the classic and original piledriver technique. From a position in which the opponent is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, the wrestler grabs around his / her opponent's midsection and lifts so that the opponent is held upside down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, the wrestler then drops to a sitting position with the opponent's head falling between the wrestler's thighs down to the mat.


A slight variation on this piledriver, often used by Mick Foley and known as a Stump-Puller Pilediver, sees the wrestler not lift the wrestler upside down, but rather pulling the bent opponent forward while the wrestler sits back, pulling the bent opponent's head down to the mat between the wrestler's thighs. Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ...


Jumping piledriver

Also known as a spike piledriver, stuff piledriver or a belly-to-back piledriver, from a position in which the opponent is bent forward against the wrestler's midsection, the wrestler grabs around their opponent's midsection and lifts so that the opponent is held upside down facing in the same direction as the wrestler, the wrestler then jumps in the air and drops to a sitting position. Paul Orndorff's version is widely considered to be the best example of this move. Paul Orndorff (born October 29, 1949 in Brandon, Florida) is a retired professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with the World Wrestling Federation and World Championship Wrestling as Mr. ...


Vertebreaker

From a position in which the opponent is standing behind the wrestler, the wrestler underhooks his/her arms under the opponent's arms. Then the wrestler twists his / her body around so that the wrestler is facing the ground and the opponent is standing with his / her back resting against the wrestler's back. Then the wrestler stands while the opponent is in an upside down position while both the opponent and the wrestler's arms are still hooked and then the wrestler then drops to a sitting position. Another way to get the opponent into the position is to approach a standing opponent from behind, hook the opponent's arms, bend forward under the opponent, and then rise up, raising the opponent upside down.


This technique is extremely dangerous, as the receiver's arms are restrained and his / her head is not placed between the wrestler's legs, giving him / her little to post against. The wrestler receiving the technique is almost entirely dependent on the wrestler's strength and coordination to avoid serious neck injury.


Though the move is often referred to as a reverse gory special piledriver, or a back to back double underhook piledriver, it is best known in Japan as a Kudo Driver, a name in reference to the move's original inventor, Japanese female wrestler, Megumi Kudo, who actually called it the Kudome Valentine. "Sugar" Shane Helms popularized the name Vertebreaker, a reference to a character from the comic book Spawn, in America after using the move under that name in World Championship Wrestling. TNA wrestler Homicide uses this as a finisher that he calls Da Gringo Killa (formerly known as Da Cop Killa). Megumi Takayama, better known under her stage name, which is also her maiden name, Megumi Kudo ), and by her nickname Kudome, is an entertainment personality, and was a professional wrestler who worked most of her career for Frontier Martial Arts Wrestling. ... Gregory Shane Helms (July 12, 1974) is an American professional wrestler from Smithfield, North Carolina, who is currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment on its SmackDown! brand. ... Spawn (real name Al Simmons) is a fictional character in Image Comics comic book of the same name. ... For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ... Nelson Erazo (born in Brooklyn, New York, New York) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Homicide. ...


Vertical suplex piledriver

Better known as the screwdriver or Pile-Plex / Plex-Driver. The wrestler applies a front facelock to the opponent and hooks the opponent's near arm over their shoulder and lifts them into a vertical suplex position. They then turn the opponent 180°, and force the opponent into the reverse piledriver position, they then drop to a sitting position, dropping the opponent on their head. Scott Steiner popularized this move in the U.S. after he learned it in Japan. Scott Carl Rechsteiner (born July 29, 1962) better known by his ring name Scott Steiner, is an American professional wrestler. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... Scott Carl Rechsteiner (born July 29, 1962) better known by his ring name Scott Steiner, is an American professional wrestler. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


See also

Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. ...

References

  1. ^ (October 2007) "Amazing But True...". WWE Magazine (16): 13.

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Piledriver (professional wrestling) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2360 words)
A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his/her opponent, turns him/her upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponent's head into the mat.
It is also considered an automatic disqualification in pro wrestling matches held in Memphis, Tennessee as the move is banned in that city (Ironically Jerry Lawler, a wrestler and promoter in that city, uses a piledriver as one of his finishing moves).
In this variation, the setup is almost the same as a Texas piledriver, but instead of grabbing the waist of the opponent, the wrestler puts their arms underneath the opponent's arms and grabs their legs by the knees.
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