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Encyclopedia > Pierre de Coubertin

Pierre de Frédy, Baron de Coubertin (January 1, 1863September 2, 1937) was a French pedagogue and historian best known for being founder of the modern Olympic Games. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1062x1190, 221 KB) Centennial Olympic Park Location: Atlanta, GA, USA Date: 18 Nov 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Centennial Olympic Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1062x1190, 221 KB) Centennial Olympic Park Location: Atlanta, GA, USA Date: 18 Nov 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Centennial Olympic Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Fountain of Rings Centennial Olympic Park is a 21 acre (85,000 m²) public park located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ... History studies the past in human terms. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


Biography

Born in Paris into an aristocratic family, the third child of Charles Louis de Frédy and Agathe-Gabrielle de Mirville De Coubertin was inspired by his visits to British and American colleges and universities, and set out to improve his education. He thought part of this improvement should be sports education, which he considered an important part of the personal development of young people. He was particularly fond of rugby and was the referee of the first ever French championship rugby union final on March 20, 1892 between Racing Club de France and Stade Français. City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... A rugby union scrum. ... Racing Club de France can refer to: the former name of Métro-Racing rugby union club the former name of Racing Club de Paris football club Category: ... Stade Français CASG Paris is a French rugby union club that plays in the 16th arrondissement of Paris at Stade Jean-Bouin, across the road from Parc des Princes. ...


He conceived of an international competition to promote athletics. A growing international interest in the ancient Olympics, fed by recent archaeological finds at Olympia, De Coubertin devised a plan to revive the Olympic Games. Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ...


To publicize these plans, he organised an international congress on June 23, 1894 at the Sorbonne in Paris. There he proposed to reinstate the ancient Olympic Games. The congress led to the establishing of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), of which De Coubertin became the general secretary. It was also decided that the first modern Olympics would take place in Athens, Greece and that they would be held every four years. These Games proved a success, and De Coubertin took over the IOC presidency when Demetrius Vikelas stepped down after the Olympics in his own country. June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Ruins of the training grounds at Olympia The Ancient Olympic Games, originally referred to as simply the Olympic Games (Greek: ; Olympiakoi Agones) were a series of athletic competitions held between various city-states of Ancient Greece. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece between 776 BC to 396 AD. Its membership is 203 National Olympic Committees. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of central Greece. ... The 1896 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the I Olympiad, were held in 1896 in Athens, Greece. ... Demetrius Vikelas (February 15, 1835 – July 20, 1908) was the first president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) from 1894 to 1896. ...

Statue at Lausanne
Statue at Lausanne

Despite the initial success, the Olympic Movement faced hard times, as the 1900 (in De Coubertin's own Paris) and 1904 Games were both swallowed by World's Fairs, and received little attention. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 300 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (300 × 450 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) See Picswiss project on Commons File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pierre... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 300 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (300 × 450 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) See Picswiss project on Commons File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pierre... Lausanne (pronounced ) is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France) and with the Jura mountains to its north. ... The 1900 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad, were held in 1900 in Paris, France. ... participants The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ...


This changed for the better after the 1906 Summer Olympics, and the Olympic Games grew to become the most important sports event. De Coubertin created the modern pentathlon for the 1912 Olympics, and subsequently stepped down from his IOC presidency after the 1924 Olympics in Paris, which proved much more successful than the first attempt in that city in 1900. He was succeeded as president by Belgian Henri de Baillet-Latour. The 1906 Summer Olympics, also called the 1906 Intercalated Games, were held in Athens, Greece. ... Competitors in the final round of the Mens Modern Pentathlon pull for the finish line at the Goudi Sports Complex on August 26, 2004. ... (Redirected from 1912 Olympics) The Games of the V Olympiad were held in 1912 in Sweden. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... Belgian Count Henri de Baillet-Latour (March 1, 1876-January 6, 1942) was the third president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ...


De Coubertin remained Honorary President of the IOC until he died in 1937 in Geneva, Switzerland. He was buried in Lausanne (the seat of the IOC), although his heart was buried separately in a monument near the ruins of ancient Olympia. Hunters a cool hobo For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... Lausanne (pronounced ) is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France) and with the Jura mountains to its north. ...


Pierre de Coubertin Medal

The Pierre de Coubertin medal (also known as the De Coubertin medal or the True Spirit of Sportsmanship medal) is an award given by the International Olympic Committee to those athletes that demonstrate the spirit of sportsmanship in the Olympic Games. The Pierre de Coubertin medal (also known as the De Coubertin medal or the True Spirit of Sportsmanship medal) is a special medal given by the International Olympic Committee to those athletes that demonstrate the spirit of sportsmanship in Olympics events. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece between 776 BC to 396 AD. Its membership is 203 National Olympic Committees. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... It is sporting to shake the hand of ones opponent after the end of a game. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


The Pierre de Coubertin medal is considered by many athletes and spectators to be the highest award that an Olympic athlete can receive, even greater than a gold medal. The International Olympic Committee considers it as its highest honor.


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pierre de Coubertin
  • International Pierre De Coubertin Committee (CIPC) - Lausanne


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Presidents of the IOC

Demetrius Vikelas (1894–1896) | Pierre de Coubertin (1896–1925) | Godefroy de Blonay (acting 1916–1919) | Henri de Baillet-Latour (1925–1942) | Sigfrid Edström (1942–1952) | Avery Brundage (1952–1972) | Lord Killanin (1972–1980) | Juan Antonio Samaranch (1980–2001) | Jacques Rogge (2001–current) | Stamp The International Olympic Committee is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894 to reinstate the Ancient Olympic Games held in Greece between 776 BC to 396 AD. Its membership is 203 National Olympic Committees. ... Demetrius Vikelas (February 15, 1835 – July 20, 1908) was the first president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) from 1894 to 1896. ... Godefroy de Blonay (born July 25, 1869 in Niederschönthal, died February 14, 1937 in Biskra) was a Swiss baron. ... Belgian Count Henri de Baillet-Latour (March 1, 1876-January 6, 1942) was the third president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... Johannes Sigfrid Edström (November 21, 1870-March 18, 1964) was a Swedish industrial and sports official. ... Avery Brundage (September 28, 1887 – May 8, 1975) was an American athlete, sports official, art collector and philanthropist. ... The Right Honourable Michael Morris, 3rd Baron Killanin, MBE (30 July 1914–25 April 1999) was an Irish journalist and sports official, the sixth president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). ... Juan Antonio Samaranch Juan Antonio Samaranch, Marquess de Samaranch (also known as Torello) (born July 17, 1920 in Barcelona) is a Spanish sports official and was president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) from 1980 to 2001. ... Jacques Rogge (born May 2, 1942) is a Belgian orthopaedic surgeon and has been the president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) since 2001. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE - THE OLYMPIC MUSEUM LAUSANNE (627 words)
Pierre Frédy, Baron de Coubertin, was born in Paris in 1863.
Coubertin, whose father was an artist and mother a musician, was raised in cultivated and aristocratic surroundings.
Pierre de Coubertin suddenly died of a heart attack on 2 September, 1937, in a park in Geneva, and thus his "symphony" remained unfinished.
INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE - ORGANISATION - STRUCTURES (305 words)
Pierre de Frédy, Baron de Coubertin was born on 1 January 1863 at 20, rue Oudinot in Paris.
Giving up the army, abandoning too the political career that was open to him at the age of twenty-four, Pierre de Coubertin decided to launch a vast movement of educational reform, and at twenty-five his life work was started.
Pierre de Coubertin permanent exhibition at the Olympic Museum Lausanne
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