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Encyclopedia > Pier Paolo Pasolini
Pier Paolo Pasolini

Born: March 5, 1922(1922-03-05)
Bologna, Italy
Died: November 2, 1975 (aged 53)
Ostia, Rome, Italy
Occupation: Novelist, poet, intellectual, film director, journalist, linguist, philosopher

Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. Image File history File links P_p_pasolini. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Statue dedicated to Pier Paolo Pasolini Ostia is a large neighborhood in the commune of Rome, Italy, on the coast facing the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... An intellectual is one who tries to use his or her intellect to work, study, reflect, speculate on, or ask and answer questions with regard to a variety of different ideas. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ...


Pasolini distinguished himself as a philosopher, linguist, novelist, playwright, filmmaker, newspaper and magazine columnist, actor, painter and political figure. He demonstrated a unique and extraordinary cultural versatility, in the process becoming a highly controversial figure. A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... The following is a list of linguists, those who study linguistics. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics, sometimes this may include political scientists. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

Pasolini was born in Bologna, traditionally one of the most leftist of Italian cities. He was the son of a lieutenant of the Italian army, Carlo Alberto, who had become famous for saving Mussolini's life, and an elementary school teacher, Susanna Colussi. His family moved to Conegliano in 1923 and, two years later, to Belluno, where another son, Guidalberto, was born. In 1926, however, Pasolini's father was arrested for gambling debts, and his mother moved to her family's house in Casarsa della Delizia, in the Friuli region. Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, Bulåggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Coat of Arms of the Italian Army Dardo IFV on exercise in Capo Teulada Soldiers of the 33rd Field Artillery Regiment Acqui on parade The Italian Army (Esercito Italiano) is the ground defense force of the Italian Republic. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Conegliano is a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Treviso, 17 miles N. by rail from the town of Treviso, 230 ft. ... The River Piave next to Belluno. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... Casarsa della Delizia is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Pordenone in the Italian region Friuli-Venezia Giulia, located about 80 km northwest of Trieste and about 15 km east of Pordenone. ... Friulian Coats of Arms Friuli (Furlan: Friûl, German: Friaul, Slovenian: Furlanija) is an area in northeastern Italy, comprising the major part of the autonomous region Friuli-Venezia Giulia. ...


Pasolini began writing poems at the age of seven, inspired by the natural beauty of Casarsa. One of his early influences was the work of Arthur Rimbaud. In 1933 his father was transferred to Cremona, and later to Scandiano and Reggio Emilia. Pasolini found it difficult to adapt to all these moves, though in the meantime he enlarged his poetry and literature readings (Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Shakespeare, Coleridge, Novalis) and left behind the religious fervor of his early years. In the Reggio Emilia high school he met his first true friend, Luciano Serra. The two met again in Bologna, where Pasolini spent seven years while completing the high school: here he cultivated new passions, including soccer. With other friends, including Ermes Parini, Franco Farolfi, Elio Meli, he formed a group dedicated to literary discussions. Rimbaud redirects here. ... Cremona is a city in northern Italy, situated in Lombardy, on the left shore of the Po river in the middle of the Pianura padana (Po valley). ... Scandiano is a town in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, administratively part of the province of Reggio Emilia. ... Country Italy Region Emilia-Romagna Province Reggio Emilia (RE) Mayor Graziano Delrio (from July 1, 2004) Elevation 58 m Area 231 km² Population  - Total 141,383  - Density 612/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Reggiani Dialing code 0522 Postal code 42100 Frazioni see list Patron San Prospero  - Day... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Coat of arms of the Tolstoy family Tolstoy, or Tolstoi (Russian: ) is a prominent family of Russian nobility, descending from one Andrey Kharitonovich Tolstoy (i. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... For the German rock band, see Novalis (band). ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ...


In 1939 he graduated and subsequently entered the Literature College of the University of Bologna, discovering new themes like philology and aesthetics of figurative arts. He also frequented the local cinema club. Pasolini always showed his friends a virile and strong exterior, totally hiding his interior travail: he even took part in the Fascist government's culture and sports competitions. In 1941, together with Francesco Leonetti, Roberto Roversi and others, he attempted to publish a poetry magazine, but the attempt failed due to paper shortages. Pasolini's poems of this period started to include fragments in Friulian language, which he had learnt at his mother's side. The University of Bologna (Italian: , UNIBO) is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in the world, and the second biggest university in Italy. ... Philology, etymologically, is the love of words. ... The Parthenons facade showing an interpretation of golden rectangles in its proportions. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


First poetical works

After the summer in Casarsa, in 1941 Pasolini published at his own expense a collection of poems in Friulian, Versi a Casarsa. The work was noted and appreciated by intellectuals and critics like Gianfranco Contini, Alfonso Gatto and Antonio Russi. His pictures had also been well received. Pasolini was chief editor of the Il Setaccio ("The Sieve") magazine, but was fired after conflicts with the director, who was aligned with the Fascist regime. A trip to Germany helped him also to discover the "provincial" status of Italian culture in that era. These experiences led Pasolini to rethink his opinion about the cultural politics of Fascism, and to switch gradually to a Communist position. Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ...


In 1942, the family took shelter in Casarsa, considered a more tranquil place to wait for the conclusion of the war. Here, for the first time, Pasolini had to face the erotic disquiet he had suppressed during his adolescent years. He wrote: "A continuous perturbation without images or words beats at my temples and obscures me". Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In the weeks before the 8 September armistice, he was drafted in World War II, and subsequently imprisoned by the Germans. However, he managed to escape disguised as a peasant, and found his way to Casarsa. Here he joined a group of other young fans of the Friulian language who aimed to give Casarsa Friulian a status equal to that of the official dialect of the region, Udine. Starting from May 1944 they issued a magazine entitled Stroligùt di cà da l'aga. In the meantime, Casarsa suffered Allied bombardments and forced enrollments by the Italian Social Republic, as well as partisan activity. Pasolini tried to remain apart from these events, teaching, along with his mother, those students whom war rendered unable to reach the schools in Pordenone or Udine. He experienced his first homosexual love for one of his students, just when a Slovenian schoolgirl, Pina Kalč, was falling in love with Pasolini himself. This complicated emotional situation turned into a tragic one on February 12, 1945, when his brother Guido was killed in an ambush. Six days later the Friulian Language Academy (Academiuta di lenga furlana) was founded. In the same year Pasolini joined also the Association for the Autonomy of Friuli, and graduated with a final thesis about Giovanni Pascoli's works. is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Armistice with Italy is an armistice that occurred on September 8, 1943, during World War II. It was signed by Italy and the Allied armed forces, who were occupying the southern half of the country at the time. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Udine (Friulian Udin, Slovene Videm) is a city in northeastern Italy, capital of the historical region of Friuli, in the middle of Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, between the Adriatic sea and the Alps (Alpi Carniche), less than 40 km from the Slovenian border. ... Anthem Giovinezza (The Youth)¹ Capital Salò Language(s) Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Head of State Benito Mussolini Historical era World War II  - Established September 23, 1943  - Disestablished April 25, 1945 ¹ External link The Italian Social Republic (Repubblica Sociale Italiana or RSI) was a Nazi puppet state led by... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pordenone (Friulian Pordenon) is a comune of Pordenone province of northeast Italy in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Giovanni Pascoli (December 31, 1855—April 6, 1912) was an Italian poet and classical scholar. ...


In 1946 a small poetry collection of Pasolini's, I Diarii ("The Diaries") was published by The Academiuta. In October he made a voyage to Rome, and the following May he began the so-called Quaderni Rossi, handwritten in old school exercise-books with red covers. In Italian he completed a drama, Il Cappellano, and another poetry collection, I Pianti ("The cries"), again published by the Academiuta. Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...


Adhesion to the Italian Communist Party

On January 26, 1947, Pasolini wrote a controversial declaration for the front page of the newspaper Libertà: "In our opinion, we think that currently only Communism is able to provide a new culture". The controversy was partially due to the fact he was still not a member of the Italian Communist Party (PCI). is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Partito Comunista Italiano (PCI) or Italian Communist Party emerged as Partito Comunista dItalia or Communist Party of Italy from a secession by the Leninist comunisti puri tendency from the Italian Socialist Party (PSI) during that bodys congress on 21 January 1921 at Livorno. ...


He was also planning to extend the work of the Academiuta to other Romance language literatures and knew the exiled Catalan poet, Carles Cardó. After his adherence to the PCI, he took part in several demonstrations and, in May 1949, attended the Peace Congress in Paris. Observing the struggles of workers and peasants, and watching the clashes of protesters with Italian police, he began to create his first novel. The Romance languages, also called Romanic languages, are a subfamily of the Italic languages, specifically the descendants of the Vulgar Latin dialects spoken by the common people evolving in different areas after the break-up of the Roman Empire. ... The Catalans are an ethnic group or nationality whose homeland is Catalonia, or the Principality of Catalonia (Catalan: Catalunya, or Principat de Catalunya), which is a historical region in southern Europe, embracing a territory situated in the north-east of Spain and an adjoining portion of southern France. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... It has been suggested that List of visitor attractions in Paris be merged into this article or section. ...


However, in October of the same year, Pasolini was charged with the corruption of minors and obscene acts in public places. As a result, he was expelled by the Udine section of the Communist Party and lost the teaching job he had obtained the previous year in Valvasone. Living a difficult situation, in January 1950 Pasolini moved to Rome with his mother.


He later described this period of his life as a very difficult one. "I came to Rome from the Friulian countryside. Unemployed for many years; ignored by everybody; riven by the fear to be not as life needed to be". Instead of asking for help from other writers, Pasolini preferred to go his own way. He found a job as a worker in the Cinecittà studios, and sold his books in the 'bancarelle' ("sidewalk shops") of Rome. Finally, through the help of the Abruzzese-language poet Vittorio Clemente, he found a job as a teacher in Ciampino, a suburb of the capital. Entrance of the Cinecittà studios Cinecittà (Italian for Cinema City) is a large film studio in Rome, Italy. ... Abruzzo is a region of Italy bordering Marche to the north, Lazio to the west and south-west, Molise to the south-east and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... Ciampino is a town in the province of Rome, Lazio, Italy. ...


In these years Pasolini transferred his Friulian countryside inspiration to Rome's suburbs, the infamous borgate where poor proletarian immigrants lived in often horrendous sanitary and social conditions. The proletariat (from Latin proles, offspring) is a term used to identify a lower social class; a member of such a class is called a proletarian. ...


Success and charges

In 1954, Pasolini, who now worked for the literature section of the Italian state radio, left his teaching job and moved to the Monteverde quarter, publishing La meglio gioventù, his first important collection of dialect poems. His first novel, Ragazzi di vita (English: Boys of Life [1956]), was published in 1955. The work had great success, but was poorly received by the PCI establishment and, most importantly, by the Italian government, which even initiated a lawsuit against Pasolini and his editor, Garzanti. // Plot Summary In the novel, Pasolini (as the narrator) tells the story of Riccetto, a street urchin who the audience is first introduced to during his Confirmation and First Communion. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


Though totally exculpated of any charge, Pasolini became a favourite victim of insinuations, especially by tabloid press.


In 1957, together with Sergio Citti, Pasolini collaborated on Federico Fellini's film Le Notti di Cabiria, writing dialogue for the Roman dialect parts. In 1960, he made his debut as an actor in Il gobbo. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... Le Notti di Cabiria or Nights of Cabiria is a 1957 film directed by Federico Fellini. ...


His first film as director and screenwriter is Accattone ("Panhandler") of 1961, again set in Rome's marginal quarters. The movie again aroused controversy and scandal. In 1963, the episode "La ricotta", included in the collective movie RoGoPaG, was censored, and Pasolini was tried for offence to the Italian state. Accattone is 1961 Italian film written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During this period, Pasolini was frequently abroad: in 1961, with Elsa Morante and Alberto Moravia in India (where he went again seven years later); in 1962 in Sudan and Kenya; in 1963, in Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea, Jordan, and Palestine (where he shot the documentary, Sopralluoghi in Palestina). In 1970, he traveled again to Africa to shoot the documentary, Appunti per un'Orestiade africana. Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elsa Morante (August 18, 1918 - 25 November 1985) was an Italian novelist, perhaps best known for her novel La Storia (History). ... Alberto Moravia. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old Kingdoms of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


The late 1960s and early 1970s were the era of the so-called "student movement." Pasolini, though acknowledging the ideological motivations of the students, thought them "anthropologically middle-class" and, therefore destined to fail in their attempts at revolutionary change. He went so far as to state, regarding the Battle of Valle Giulia, which took place in Rome in March, 1968, that he sympathized with the police, as they were "children of the poor", while the young militants were exponents of what he called "left-wing fascism." His film of that year, Teorema, was shown at the annual Venice Film Festival in a hot political climate, as Pasolini had proclaimed that the festival would be managed by the directors themselves (see also Works section). The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The Battle of Valle Giulia is a clash occurred between Italian left-winged militants and the Italian police at Valle Giulia, in Rome, on March 1, 1968. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Teorema is an Italian language movie directed in 1968 by Pier Paolo Pasolini with Laura Betti, Silvana Mangano, Massimo Girotti, Terence Stamp, and Anne Wiazemsky. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922 – November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. ...


In 1970, Pasolini bought an old castle near Viterbo, several kilometers north of Rome, where he began to write his last novel, Petrolio, which was never finished. In 1972, he started to collaborate with the extreme-left association Lotta Continua, producing a documentary, 12 dicembre concerning the Piazza Fontana bombing. The following year, he began a collaboration for Italy's most renowned newspaper, Il Corriere della Sera. Country Italy Region Lazio Province Viterbo (VT) Mayor Giampiero Gabbianelli Elevation 326 m Area 406,28 km² Population  - Total 60,537  - Density 148. ... Lotta Continua was a far left political party in Italy, involved in the autonomism movement. ... The Piazza Fontana bombing (Italian: ) refers to the terrorist bombing on December 12, 1969 in the offices of Banca Nazionale dellAgricoltura (National Agrarian Bank) in Piazza Fontana, Milan, Italy, carried out by far-right terrorists. ... Corriere della Sera is an Italian newspaper printed in Milan. ...


At the beginning of 1975, Garzanti published a collection of critical essays, Scritti corsari ("Corsair Writings"). Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Death

Pasolini was brutally murdered by being run over several times with his own car, dying on November 2, 1975 on the beach at Ostia, near Rome, in a location typical of his novels. Statue dedicated to Pier Paolo Pasolini Ostia is a large neighborhood in the commune of Rome, Italy, on the coast facing the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...


Giuseppe Pelosi, a seventeen-year-old hustler, was arrested and confessed to murdering Pasolini. However, on May 7th, 2005, he retracted his confession, which he said was made under the threat of violence to his family, and claimed that three strangers with southern Italian accents had committed the murder, insulting Pasolini as a "filthy communist." A male prostitute (or rent boy (UK)/hustler (US)) is a sex worker or prostitute who earns money by providing sexual services to clients. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Following Pelosi's retraction, the investigation into Pasolini's death was reopened, although the murder is still not completely explained. Contradictions in the declarations of Pelosi, a strange intervention by Italian secret services during the investigations, and some lack of coherence in related documents during the different parts of the judicial procedures brought some of Pasolini's friends (particularly actress Laura Betti, a close friend) to suspect that it had been a contract killing. The inefficiency of the investigations were exposed by his friend, Oriana Fallaci, writing in "Europeo" magazine. Many clues suggest that it was unlikely that Pelosi killed Pasolini alone. Laura Betti (May 1, 1927 - July 31, 2004) was an Italian actress. ... Oriana Fallaci Oriana Fallaci (born July 29, 1930) is an Italian journalist , author, and political interviewer. ...


In the months just before his death, Pasolini had met with a number of politicians, whom he made aware of his knowledge of certain important secrets.


Other evidence, uncovered in 2005, points to Pasolini having been murdered by an extortionist. Testimony by Pasolini's friend, Sergio Citti, indicates that some of the rolls of film from Salò had been stolen, and that Pasolini had been going to meet with the thieves after a visit to Stockholm, November 2, 1975. For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ...


Others report that, shortly before he was found dead in Ostia, outside Rome, he told them he knew he would be murdered by the mafia.


Despite the Roman police's reopening of the murder case following Pelosi's statement of May 2005, the judges charged with investigating it determined the new elements insufficient for them to continue the inquiry.


Pasolini was buried in Casarsa, in his beloved Friuli. In the grave, he wears the jersey of the Italian Showmen national team, a charity soccer team he founded, with others.


On the 30th anniversary of his death, a biographical cartoon, entitled Pasolini requiem (2005), was animated and directed by Mario Verger, with passages drawn from Mamma Roma, Uccellacci e uccellini, and La Terra vista dalla Luna. It ends with a description of the Ostia murder. Mamma Roma is a 1962 film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... The Hawks and the Sparrows is a 1966 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ...


Works

Pasolini's first novel, Ragazzi di vita (1955), dealt with the Roman lumpen proletariat. The resulting obscenity charges against him were the first of many instances where his art provoked legal problems, and again, with Accattone (1961), also about the Roman underworld, like-wise provoked moralistic conflict with conservatives, who demanded stricter censorship. // Plot Summary In the novel, Pasolini (as the narrator) tells the story of Riccetto, a street urchin who the audience is first introduced to during his Confirmation and First Communion. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The lumpenproletariat (German Lumpenproletariat, rabble-proletariat) is a term used by Marxists to describe the section of the proletariat that cant find legal work on a regular basis. ... Obscenity in Latin obscenus, meaning foul, repulsive, detestable, (possibly derived from ob caenum, literally from filth). The term is most often used in a legal context to describe expressions (words, images, actions) that offend the prevalent sexual morality of the time. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Accattone is 1961 Italian film written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... It has been suggested that Suppression of dissent be merged into this article or section. ...


He then directed the black-and-white The Gospel According To St. Matthew (1964). This film is widely hailed the best cinematic adaptation of the life of Jesus (Enrique Irazoqui). Whilst filming it, Pasolini vowed to direct it from the "believer's point of view", but later, upon viewing the completed work, saw he had instead expressed his own beliefs. Il Vangelo secondo Matteo is a 1964 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Enrique Irazoqui is a Spanish (Catalan) movie actor. ...


In his 1966 film, Uccellacci e uccellini (Italian: Bad Birds and Little Birds; English: 'The Hawks and the Sparrows), a picaresque - and at the same time mystic - fable, he wanted the great Italian comedian Totò to work with one of his preferred "naif" actors, Ninetto Davoli. It was a unique opportunity for Totò to demonstrate that he was a great dramatic actor as well. // Events Top grossing films North America Thunderball Dr. Zhivago Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? That Darn Cat! The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming Academy Awards Best Picture: A Man for All Seasons - Highland, Columbia Best Actor: Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons Best Actress: Elizabeth Taylor... The Hawks and the Sparrows is a 1966 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Antonio De Curtis Totò was the stage name of Antonio de Curtis (born Antonio Clemente, February 15, 1898, Naples – April 15, 1967, Rome), an Italian actor, writer, and songwriter. ... Ninetto Davoli as Othello, 1968 Ninetto Davoli (born October 11, 1948 in San Pietro a Maida, Calabria, Italy as Giovanni Davoli) is an Italian actor who became known through his roles in several of Pier Paolo Pasolinis films. ...


In Teorema (Theorem, 1968), starring Terence Stamp as a mysterious stranger, he depicted the sexual coming-apart of a bourgeois family (later repeated by François Ozon in Sitcom). Teorema is an Italian language movie directed in 1968 by Pier Paolo Pasolini with Laura Betti, Silvana Mangano, Massimo Girotti, Terence Stamp, and Anne Wiazemsky. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Terence Stamp (born July 22, 1939) is an English actor. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... François Ozon (born November 15, 1967) is a French writer and director whose films are usually characterized by sharp satirical wit and a freewheeling view on human sexuality. ... Sitcom is a 1998 satirical movie directed by François Ozon that shows the unlikely coming apart of a bourgeois family that is morally bankrupted when their father introduces a new pet, a white rat. ...


Later movies centered on sex-laden folklore, such as Il fiore delle mille e una notte (Arabian Nights, 1974), Boccaccio's Decameron (1971) and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (1972), on to the Trilogy of Life. His final work, the only one from the expected Trilogy of Death, Salò (1975), exceeded what most viewers could then stomach in its explicit scenes of intensely sadistic violence. Based on the novel 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade, it continues to be his most controversial film; in May 2006, Time Out's Film Guide named it the Most Controversial Film of all time. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Il fiore delle mille e una notte (The flower of the one thousand and one nights) is a 1974 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and is based on the novel The Book of One Thousand and One Nights. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Giovanni Boccaccio Giovanni Boccaccio (June 16, 1313 – December 21, 1375) was an Italian author and poet, a friend and correspondent of Petrarch, an important Renaissance humanist in his own right and author of a number of notable works including On Famous Women, the Decameron and his poetry in the vernacular. ... Il Decameron (The Decameron) is a 1971 film by Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini, based on the novel Decamerone by Giovanni Boccaccio. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Geoffrey Chaucer (c. ... I racconti di Canterbury is a 1972 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and is based on the novel The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Salò or the 120 Days of Sodom) is a 1975 film by Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini, based on the book The 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 120 Days of Sodom or the School of Freedoms (Les 120 journées de Sodome ou lécole du libertinage) is a book written by the French writer Marquis de Sade in 1784. ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ...


Significance

Pasolini, as a director, created a sort of picaresque neorealism, showing a sad reality—hidden, but concrete—which many social and political forces had no interest in seeing in artistic work for public distribution. Mamma Roma (1962), featuring Anna Magnani and telling the story of a prostitute and her son, was an astonishing affront to the common morality of those times. His works, with their unequaled poetry applied to cruel realities, showing that such realities are less distant from us than we imagine, have made a major contribution to a change in the Italian psyche. The picaresque novel (Spanish: picaresco, from pícaro, for rogue or rascal) is a popular subgenre of prose fiction which is usually satirical and depicts in realistic and often humorous detail the adventures of a roguish hero of low social class who lives by his or her wits in a... Italian neorealism is a film movement often considered to have started in 1943 with Ossessione and ended in 1952 with Umberto D. The movement is characterized by stories set amongst the poor and working class, filmed in long takes on location, frequently using nonprofessional actors for secondary and sometimes primary... Mamma Roma is a 1962 film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anna Magnani (March 7, 1908 - September 26, 1973) was an Academy Award-winning Italian actress, with stage experience. ...


The director also promoted in his works the concept of "natural sacredness," the idea that the world is holy in and of itself, and does not need any spiritual essence or supernatural blessing to attain this state. Indeed, Pasolini was an avowed atheist. For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ...


General disapproval of Pasolini's work was perhaps primarily caused by his frequent focus on sexual mores and the contrast between what he presented and the behavior sanctioned by public opinion. While Pasolini's poetry, outside of Italy less well-known than his films, often deals with his same-sex love interests, this is not the only, or even main, theme: much of it also takes as a subject his highly revered mother. As a sensitive and extremely intelligent man, he also depicted certain corners of the contemporary reality as few other poets could do.


His films won awards at the Berlin Film Festival, Cannes Film Festival, Venice Film Festival, Italian National Syndicate for Film Journalists, Jussi Awards, Kinema Junpo Awards, International Catholic Film Office and New York Film Critics Circle. The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... The Venice Film Festival ( ) is the oldest film festival in the world. ... The Jussi is the Finnish equivalent of the Oscar Academy Award. ... New York Film Critics Circle Awards are given annually to honor excellence in cinema worldwide by an organization of film reviewers from New York City-based publications. ...


Political views

Pasolini generated heated public discussion with controversial analyses of public affairs. For instance, during the disorders of 1969, when the autonomist university students were carrying on a guerrilla-like uprising against the police in the streets of Rome and all the leftist forces declared their complete support for the students, describing the disorders as a civil fight of proletariat against the System, Pasolini, alone among the communists, declared that he was with the police; or, more precisely, with the policemen. He considered them true proletariat, sent to fight for a poor salary and for reasons which they could not understand, against pampered boys of their same age, because they had not had the fortune of being able to study, referring to poliziotti figli di proletari meridionali picchiati da figli di papà in vena di bravate, lit. policemen, sons of proletarian southerners, beaten up by daddy's boys in bragging mood). This ironic statement, however, did not stop him from contributing to the autonomist Lotta continua movement. Raised fist, stenciled protest symbol of Autonome at the Ernst-Kirchweger-Haus in Vienna, Austria Autonomism refers to a set of left-wing political and social movements and theories close to the socialist movement. ... Lotta Continua was a far left political party in Italy, involved in the autonomism movement. ...


Pasolini was also an ardent critic of consumismo, i.e. consumerism, which he felt had rapidly destroyed Italian society in the late 1960s/early 1970s, particularly the class of the subproletariat, which he portrayed in Accattone, and to which he felt both sexually and artistically drawn. Pasolini observed that the kind of purity which he perceived in the pre-industrial popular culture was rapidly vanishing, a process that he named la scomparsa delle lucciole, lit. "the disappearance of glow-worms"), the animalistic joie de vivre of the boys being rapidly replaced with more bourgeois ambitions such as a house and a family. The coprophagia scenes in Salò were described by him as being a comment on the processed food industry. “Consumerist” redirects here. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Accattone is 1961 Italian film written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... Coprophagia is the consumption of feces, from the Greek copros (feces) and phagein (eat). ...


Not only economic globalization but also the cultural domination of the North of Italy (around Milan) over other regions, especially the South, primarily through the power of TV, angered him. He opposed the gradual disappearance of Italian dialects by writing some of his poetry in Friulian, the regional language of the region where he spent his childhood. A KFC franchise in Kuwait. ... Northern Italy encompasses nine of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia Liguria Lombardia Piemonte Toscana Trentino-Alto Adige Valle dAosta Veneto Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige and Valle dAosta are regions with a special statute. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... “TV” redirects here. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... Friulian Coats of Arms Friuli (Furlan: Friûl, German: Friaul, Slovenian: Furlanija) is an area in northeastern Italy, comprising the major part of the autonomous region Friuli-Venezia Giulia. ...


He, despite his left-wing views opposed abortion and radicalism [1]. The term Radical (latin radix meaning root) has been used since the late 18th century as a label in political science for those favoring or trying to produce thoroughgoing or extreme political reforms which can include changes to the social order to a greater or lesser extent. ...


Sexuality

The glbtq encyclopedia states the following regarding Pasolini's homosexuality: Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ...

While openly gay from the very start of his career (thanks to a gay sex scandal that sent him packing from his provincial hometown to live and work in Rome), Pasolini rarely dealt with homosexuality in his movies. The subject is featured prominently in Teorema (1968), where Terence Stamp's mysterious God-like visitor seduces the son of an upper-middle-class family; passingly in Arabian Nights (1974), in an idyll between a king and a commoner that ends in death; and, most darkly of all, in Salò (1975), his infamous rendition of the Marquis de Sade's compendium of sexual horrors, The 120 Days of Sodom. [1] Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Teorema is an Italian language movie directed in 1968 by Pier Paolo Pasolini with Laura Betti, Silvana Mangano, Massimo Girotti, Terence Stamp, and Anne Wiazemsky. ... Terence Stamp (born July 22, 1939) is an English actor. ... The Flower of the One Thousand and One Nights (Il fiore delle Mille e una notte) is a 1974 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and is based on The Book of One Thousand and One Nights. ... Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Salò or the 120 Days of Sodom) is a 1975 film by Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini, based on the book The 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade. ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ... The 120 Days of Sodom or the School of Freedoms (Les 120 journées de Sodome ou lécole du libertinage) is a book written by the French writer Marquis de Sade in 1784. ...

Quotes

"If you know that I am an unbeliever, then you know me better than I do myself. I may be an unbeliever, but I am an unbeliever who has a nostalgia for a belief." (1966) Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


"The mark which has dominated all my work is this longing for life, this sense of exclusion, which doesn't lessen but augments this love of life." (Interview in documentary, late 1960s)


Filmography

Accattone is 1961 Italian film written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... Mamma Roma is a 1962 film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... This was a short film written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini in 1962 and was part of the omnibus film RoGoPaG. It is often considered the most memorable portion of RoGoPaG and the height of Pasolinis creative powers and social criticism. ... Il Vangelo secondo Matteo is a 1964 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... The Hawks and the Sparrows is a 1966 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. ... ... Le Streghe (aka Les Sorcieres; The Witches) 1966 - France/Italy Hard-core Clint Eastwood or Dino De Laurentiis fans will definitely appreciate this truly bizarre film. ... Teorema is an Italian language movie directed in 1968 by Pier Paolo Pasolini with Laura Betti, Silvana Mangano, Massimo Girotti, Terence Stamp, and Anne Wiazemsky. ... Pigpen (Italian Porcile) is a 1969 italian language film, directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and starring Marco Ferreri, Ugo Tognazzi and Alberto Lionello. ... Maria Callas as Medea A film by Pier Paolo Pasolini based on the plot of Euripides Medea (play). ... Il Decameron (The Decameron) is a 1971 film by Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini, based on the novel Decamerone by Giovanni Boccaccio. ... I racconti di Canterbury is a 1972 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and is based on The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. ... Il fiore delle mille e una notte (The flower of the one thousand and one nights) is a 1974 Italian film directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini and is based on the novel The Book of One Thousand and One Nights. ... Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma (Salò or the 120 Days of Sodom) is a 1975 film by Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini, based on the book The 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade. ...

Selected bibliography

Narrative

  • Poems
  • Ragazzi di vita (The Ragazzi, 1955)
  • Una vita violenta (A Violent Life, 1959)
  • Amado Mio - Atti Impuri (1982, originally composed in 1962)
  • Alì dagli occhi azzurri (1965)
  • Reality (The Poets' Encyclopedia, 1979)
  • Petrolio (1992, incomplete)

// Plot Summary In the novel, Pasolini (as the narrator) tells the story of Riccetto, a street urchin who the audience is first introduced to during his Confirmation and First Communion. ... The Poets Encyclopedia summarizes the literary, art and music worlds of New York City in the 1970s. ...

Poetry

  • La meglio gioventù (1954)
  • Le ceneri di Gramsci (1957)
  • L'usignolo della chiesa cattolica (1958)
  • La religione del mio tempo (1961)
  • Poesia in forma di rosa (1964)
  • Trasumanar e organizzar (1971)
  • La nuova gioventù (1975)

Essays

  • Passione e ideologia (1960)
  • Canzoniere italiano, poesia popolare italiana (1960)
  • Empirismo eretico (1972)
  • Lettere luterane (1976)
  • Le belle bandiere (1977)
  • Descrizioni di descrizioni (1979)
  • Il caos (1979)
  • La pornografia è noiosa (1979)
  • Scritti corsari 1975)
  • Lettere (1940-1954) (Letters, 1940-54, 1986)

Theatre

  • Orgia (1968)
  • Porcile (1968)
  • Calderón (1973)
  • Affabulazione (1977)
  • Pilade (1977)
  • Bestia da stile (1977)

References and sources

  • Aichele, George. "Translation as De-canonization: Matthew's Gospel According to Pasolini - filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini - Critical Essay." Cross Currents (2002). FindArticles. 12 Feb. 2006. A review of The Gospel According to St. Matthew as a re-writing of the Christian canon.
  • Distefano, John. "Picturing Pasolini." Art Journal (1997). EBSCO. Rutgers University Alexander Library, New Brunwick, NJ. 15 Feb. 2006. The author traces Pasolini's coverage in the media in photographs. He pays particular attention to how Pasolini's manhood and homosexuality are portrayed. The author created an art exhibition with the same title.
  • Eloit, Audrene. "Oedipus Rex by Pier Paolo Pasolini The Palimpsest: Rewriting and the Creation of Pasolini's Cinematic Language." Literature Film Quarterly (2004). FindArticles. A review and discussion of Pasolini's interpretation of Sophocles's text, Freud, and cinematic theory.
  • Forni, Kathleen. "A "cinema of poetry": What Pasolini Did to Chancer's Canterbury Tales." Literature Film Quarterly (2002). FindArticles. 12 Feb. 2006. A review of The Canterbury Tales as both an homage to Chaucer and a parody in the Bakhtinian spirit.
  • Frisch, Anette. "Francesco Vezzolini: Pasolini Reloaded." Rutgers University Alexander Library, New Brunwick, NJ. 15 Feb. 2006. In an interview, Vezzolini discusses Pasolini's influence on his art installation: "The Trilogy of Death." He discusses what Pasolini may have done had he lived, and how poetry and literature made Pasolini respectable.
  • Greene, Naomi. Pier Paolo Pasilini: Cinema as Heresy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1990. Greene opens with a personal chapter on Pasolini's life and death. The second chapter discusses how Acettone and Mamma Roma were received by audiences and critics and the immediate impact of the films. La Rabbia, Il Vangelo and Comizi d'amore are discussed in relation to Gramsci and Marx. The book ends in a discussion on Pasolini's cinematic theory and his influence on future film makers.
  • Green, Martin. "The Dialectic Adaptation." Rutgers University Alexander Library, New Brunswick, NJ. 15 Feb. 2006. Green compares Pasolini's The Canterbury Tales with Chaucer's original text and Pasolini's Decameron. He proposes that Pasolini was asserting his right to deal with entertaining material for its own sae, a departure from his normally serious tone.
  • Pugh, Tison. "Chaucerian Fabliaux, Cinematic Fabliau: Pier Paolo Pasolini's I racconti di Canterbury." Literature Film Quarterly (2004). FindArticles. 12 Feb. 2006. An in-depth review and interpretation of The Canterbury Tales.
  • Restivo, Angelo. The Cinema of Economic Miracles: Visuality and Modernization in the Italian Art Film. London: Duke UP, 2002. In part two, "The Nation, the Body, and Pasolini", Restivo discusses the creation of a "neo-Italiano" language, the "Italian" and living in a modern world. Restivo describes the political and economic situation of Pasolini's Italy and its relationship to the films. Chapter five discusses sex and the body in the creation of "the new Italian."
  • Rohdie, Sam. The Passion of Pier Paolo Pasolini. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana UP, 1995. Rohdie's book deals with parts of Pasolini's life that is overlooked by other authors. He deals with Pasolini not just as a poet or a film maker, but as a full character. He puts Pasolini in a larger tradition of Western thought and shows how he uses undeveloped societies to criticize his world. Rohdie also asserts that Pasolini was neither a Socialist or a Communist, but he was a revolutionary.
  • Rumble, Patrick A. Allegories of contamination : Pier Paolo Pasolini's Trilogy of life. Toronto: University of Toronto P, 1996. "The Trilogy of Life" consisted of Decameron, The Canterbury Tales and Arabian Nights. Rumble goes into great detail interpreting the trilogy and naming possible inspirations and making comparisons. A whole chapter is devoted to Decameron, but for most of the book the films as discussed together. A brief closing chapter discusses the significance of Pasolini's homosexuality on his work.
  • Schwartz, Barth D. Pasolini Requiem. 1st ed. New York: Pantheon Books, 1992. Schwartz's book is an exhaustingly thorough biography of Pasolini's adult life (and death). It includes personal details, the making of his key films, accounts of his legal troubles, and summaries of the films themselves.
  • Siciliano, Enzo. Pasolini: A Biography. Trans. John Shepley. New York: Random House, 1982. Written by a friend of Pasolini, it is a thorough, factual (if heavy) account of Pasolini's life.
  • Viano, Maurizio. A Certain Realism: Making Use of Pasolini's Film Theory and Practice. Berkeley: University of California P, 1993. Viano analyzes Pasolini's major inspirations and influences, providing an "essential biography" before dedicating a chapter to each of his major films. Each chapter opens with a very brief summary of the film followed by an easy to read, yet thorough analysis of the film in the context of other works, other film makers, current events and the work of critics and historians. This is an excellent source for anyone seeking to understand and appreciate Pasolini's films.
  • Willimon, William H. "Faithful to the script." Christian Century (2004). FindArticles. 12 Feb. 2006. A favorable review of The Gospel According to St. Matthew from a Christian perspective written by an American Bishop.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Enzo Siciliano (born in Rome, May 27, 1934 – died June 9, 2006) was an Italian writer. ...

External links

  • [2] Video (in Italian): Pasolini on the destructive impact of television (interrupted and half-censored by Enzo Biagi)
Persondata
NAME Pasolini, Pier Paolo
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Italian novelist, poet, intellectual, film director, journalist, linguist, philosopher
DATE OF BIRTH March 5, 1922
PLACE OF BIRTH Bologna, Italy
DATE OF DEATH November 2, 1975
PLACE OF DEATH Ostia, Rome, Italy

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bologna (IPA , from Latin Bononia, BulÃ¥ggna in Emiliano-Romagnolo dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, in the Pianura Padana, between the Po River and the Apennines, exactly between the Reno River and the Sàvena River. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Statue dedicated to Pier Paolo Pasolini Ostia is a large neighborhood in the commune of Rome, Italy, on the coast facing the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pier Paolo Pasolini - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3492 words)
In 1926, however, Pasolini's father was arrested for gambling debts, and his mother moved to her family's house in Casarsa, in the Friuli region.
Pasolini found it difficult to adapt to all these moves, though in the meantime he enlarged his poetry and literature readings (Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Shakespeare, Coleridge, Novalis) and left behind the religious fervor of his early years.
Pasolini's poetry, lesser known outside of Italy, often deals with his highly revered mother and his same-sex love interests, but this is not the main and only theme.
Pier Paolo Pasolini's Theorem (1864 words)
Pasolini’s father was an army officer in the Carabinieri, a convinced Fascist and was of aristocratic origin.
Pasolini's mother was of the peasantry albeit well off in her class and Pasolini displays great affection towards her, most notably in his poem “Prayer to My Mother” (1962).
Consequently Pasolini was arrested and imprisoned for the supposed blasphemous irreverence of the episode.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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