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Encyclopedia > Pickled cucumber
A deli pickle.
A deli pickle.

A pickled cucumber, most often simply called a pickle in the United States and Canada, is a cucumber that has been pickled in a brine, vinegar, or other solutions and left to ferment for a period of time. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2660x916, 194 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pickled cucumber ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2660x916, 194 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pickled cucumber ... This article is about the fruit. ... For other uses, see Pickle. ... For the sports equipment manufacturer, see Brine, Corp. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ...

Contents

Origin

Cucumbers were probably first pickled 4400 years ago in Mesopotamia.[1] In India, pickles were well known by the Vedic period.[2] Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... Map of early Iron Age Vedic India after Witzel (1989). ...


The pickling process was also known to the Ancient Greeks. Aristotle is reported to have praised pickled cucumbers for their healing effects.[1][2] Julius Caesar's soldiers ate pickled cucumbers as health aids;[2] many other brine-soaked foods were part of daily life in Ancient Rome.[3] Cucumber pickling remained widespread across the Levant and Maghreb regions, where it is still very popular today. The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: ) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... The Arab Maghreb Union This article is about the region. ...


Pickled cucumbers became popular in the United States due to the influence of the cuisine of Central and Eastern European immigrants.


Types

Gherkin

A gherkin is not only a pickle of a certain size but also a particular species of cucumber: the West Indian or Burr cucumber (Cucumis anguria), which produces a somewhat smaller fruit than the garden cucumber (Cucumis sativus).[4] Standard pickles are made from the West Indian cucumber, but the term gherkin has become loosely used as any small cucumber pickled in a sweet vinegar brine, regardless of the variety of cucumber used. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Cucumis anguria. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... This article is about the fruit. ... Binomial nomenclature Cucumis sativus Ref: ITIS 22364 The cucumber is the edible fruit of the cucumber plant Cucumis sativus, which belongs to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae, as do melons and squash. ...


Kosher dill

A "kosher" dill pickle is usually not kosher in the sense that it has been prepared under rabbinical supervision, which would ensure that no non-kosher ingredients were used, and that no utensil in contact with the pickles had ever been in contact with food that was not kosher. Rather, it is a pickle made in the traditional manner of Jewish New York City pickle makers, with generous addition of garlic to the brine.[5][6] The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ...


Polish

Polish "ogórek kiszony"
Polish "ogórek kiszony"

Polish style pickled cucumbers (Polish: ogórek kiszony, plural: ogórki kiszone) are a type of pickled cucumber developed in the northern parts of Europe and have been exported worldwide and are found in the cuisines of many countries. As opposed to some other varieties of pickled cucumbers, they are prepared using the traditional process of natural fermentation in a salty brine which makes them grow sour. There is no vinegar used in the brine of a Polish-style pickled cucumber (Ogórek kiszony). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 526 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (877 × 1000 pixel, file size: 964 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 526 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (877 × 1000 pixel, file size: 964 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Typically, small cucumbers are placed in a ceramic vessel or a wooden barrel, together with a variety of spices. Among those traditionally used in many recipes are garlic, horseradish, whole dill stems with umbels and green seeds, white mustard seeds, oak, cherry, blackcurrant and bay laurel leaves, dried allspice fruits, and — most importantly — salt. The cucumbers are then placed under clear water and kept under a non-airtight cover for several weeks, depending on taste and external temperature. The more salt is added the more sour the cucumbers become. Since they are produced without vinegar, a scum forms on the top, but this does not indicate they have spoiled, and the scum is just removed. They do not, however, keep as long as cucumbers pickled with vinegar. Binomial name P.G. Gaertn. ... For other uses, see Dill (disambiguation). ... Look up Mustard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. The Blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) is a species of Ribes berry native to central and northern Europe and northern Asia. ... Binomial name Laurus nobilis L. The Bay Laurel (Laurus nobilis, Lauraceae), also known as True Laurel, Sweet Bay, Grecian Laurel, or just Laurel, is an evergreen tree or large shrub reaching 10–18 m tall, native to the Mediterranean region. ... This article is about common table salt. ...


The concoction produced during the fermentation process is often consumed as a drink (a natural treatment against hangover, rather). For other uses, see Hangover (disambiguation). ...


In Poland they are traditionally served as a side dish to vodka.


Lime

Lime pickles are soaked in lime rather than in a salt brine.[7] Vinegar and sugar are often added after the 24-hour soak in lime, along with pickling spices, although this is done more to enhance flavor than as a preservative. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Bread and butter

A jar of bread-and-butter pickles
A jar of bread-and-butter pickles

Bread-and-butter pickles are sweeter in flavor than dill pickles, having a high concentration of sugar added to the brine. Rather than being served alongside a sandwich, they are more often used in fully-flavored sandwiches, such as hamburgers, or used in potato salad. This article is about the food item. ... This article is about the salad. ...


Swedish and Danish

Swedish pickled cucumbers (pressgurka) are thinly sliced, mixed with salt and pressed to drain some water from the cucumber slices. Afterwards placed in a jar with a sour-sweet brine of vinegar, salt, sugar, pepper and parsley.


Danish cucumber salad (agurkesalat) is similar, but the cucumbers are not pressed and the brine doesn't have parsley. The cucumber salad accompanies meat dishes, especially a roasted chicken dish (gammeldags kylling med agurkesalat), and is used on Danish hot dogs. This article contains a trivia section. ...


Kool-Aid Pickles (a.k.a. "Koolickles")

Kool-Aid pickles (considered a delicacy in parts of the Southern United States[8]) are created by soaking dill pickles in a mixture of Kool-Aid and pickle brine. Categories: Food and drink stubs | Kraft brands | Beverages ...


Nutrition

Much like sauerkraut (also technically a pickle), pickled cucumbers are rich in vitamin C. Even though pickled cucumbers have been put through the pickling process, they are still considered a fruit. For more information, see NutritionData: Pickles. Sauerkraut and sausage on a plate Pickled Eisbein, served with Sauerkraut Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Look up pickle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the nutrient. ...


Serving

A breaded pickle.
A breaded pickle.

In the United States, pickles are often served as a "side" to various lunches in the form of a "pickle spear", which is a pickled cucumber cut length-wise into quarters or sixths. The pickle may be used as a condiment on a hamburger or other sandwich (usually in slice form), or to a sausage or hot dog in chopped form as pickle relish. A pickle slice is commonly referred to as a 'chip'. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 734 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 734 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... For other uses, see Relish (disambiguation). ...


Soured cucumbers are commonly used in a variety of dishes — for example, pickle-stuffed meatloaf,[9] potato salad or chicken salad — or consumed alone as an appetizer. More-or-less a filling for other salads or as a sandwich filling, chicken salad is an adequate way to use-up leftover chicken. ...


Pickles have also been introduced in fried form, either deep-fried plain, or with a breading surrounding the spear. Plantains frying in vegetable oil. ... A Deep fried Twinkie Breaded, deep-fried squid Deep frying is a cooking method whereby food is submerged in hot oil or fat. ... A crouton is a small piece of dry or fried bread, often seasoned, that is used to add texture and flavour to salads, notably the Caesar salad, and in soups. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Terebelski, D.; Ralph, N. (2003). Pickle History Timeline. New York Food Museum.
  2. ^ a b c Best-Maid Pickling History
  3. ^ Kurlansky, M. (2003) Salt: A History of the World
  4. ^ Dr. Jerry Parsons, of Texas Cooperative Extension (Texas A&M) Aggie Horticulture
  5. ^ Brief note on kosher pickles in "The Pickle Wing" of nyfoodmuseum.org
  6. ^ Kashrut: Jewish Dietary Laws "Judaism 101"
  7. ^ Recipe Source
  8. ^ New York Times: A Sweet So Sour: Kool-Aid Dills
  9. ^ Pickled Stuffed Meatloaf at ilovepickles.org

General reference:

  • Battcock, Mike & Azam-Ali, Sue (1998), Fermented Fruits and Vegetables: A Global Perspective, Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, ISBN 92-5-104226-8, OCLC 41178885 .
The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pickled cucumber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (403 words)
A pickled cucumber is a popular pickled fruit found in many cuisines around the world (see Pickling).
Cucumber pickling remained widespread across the Levant and the Maghrib, where it is still very popular today.
Cucumber pickling is almost universally done through a brine fermentation process.
pickling: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (896 words)
Pickling, or corning, is the process of preparing a food by soaking and storing it in a brine containing salt and/or acid (usually vinegar), a process which can preserve otherwise perishable foods for months.
In Romania, common pickles are cucumbers, green tomatoes (gogonele), carrots, cabbage, bell peppers, melons, mushrooms and cauliflowers.
Pickled beetroot and condiments such as Branston Pickle and piccalilli are typically eaten as an accompaniment to pork pies and cold meats or a ploughman's lunch.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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