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Encyclopedia > Picketing
Employees of the BBC form a picket line during a strike in May 2005.
Employees of the BBC form a picket line during a strike in May 2005.

Picketing is a form of protest in which people congregate outside a place of work or location where an event is taking place. Often, this is done in an attempt to dissuade others from going in ("crossing the picket line"), but it can also be done to draw public attention to a cause. Pickets normally endeavor to be non-violent. It can have a number of aims, but is generally to put pressure on the party targeted to meet particular demands. This pressure is achieved by harming the business through loss of custom and negative publicity, or by discouraging or preventing workers from entering the site and thereby preventing the business from operating normally. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Picketing was a military physical punishment for which the culprit was strung up to a hook by one wrist with the opposite bare heel supporting the whole body weight, only resting upon a stake or picket, rounded at the point somewhat in order not to pierce the skin. ... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... Nonviolent resistance (or nonviolent action) is the practice of applying power to achieve socio-political goals through symbolic protests, economic or political noncooperation, civil disobedience and other methods, without the use of physical violence. ...


Picketing is a common tactic used by trade unions during strikes, who will try to prevent dissident members of the union, members of other unions and ununionised workers from working. Those who cross the picket line and work despite the strike are known pejoratively as scabs. A Trade Union (Labour union) ... is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... See also general strike, or for other uses see: strike (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Types of picket

A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike on 2006-03-28, with members carrying picket signs.
A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike on 2006-03-28, with members carrying picket signs.

A mass picket is an attempt to bring as many people as possible to a picket line, in order to demonstrate support for the cause. It is primarily used when only one workplace is being picketed, or for a symbolically or practically important workplace. Due to the numbers involved, a mass picket may turn into a blockade. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 655 KB) Summary A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike (industrial action), 2006-03-28. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 655 KB) Summary A rally of the trade union UNISON in Oxford during a strike (industrial action), 2006-03-28. ... For other uses, see Unison (disambiguation). ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (88th in leap years). ... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ...


Secondary picketing is where people picket locations that are not directly connected to the issue of protest. This would include retail stores that sell products by the company being picketed against, and the private homes of the company's management. Secondary pickets often do not have the same civil law protection as primary pickets.


Another tactic is to organize highly mobile picketers who can turn up at any of a company's locations on short notice. These flying pickets are particularly effective against multifacility businesses which could otherwise pursue legal prior restraint and shift operations among facilities if the location of the picket were known with certainty ahead of time. Prior restraint is a legal term referring to a governments actions that prevent materials from being published. ...


Picketing is also used by pressure groups across the political spectrum. An advocacy group, interest group or lobbying group is a group, however loosely or tightly organized, doing advocacy: those determined to encourage or prevent changes in public policy without trying to be elected. ...


Disruptive picketing

Disruptive picketing is where picketers use force, or the threat of force, or physical obstruction, to injure or intimidate or otherwise interfere with either staff, service users, or customers.[1]


In the US, disruptive picketing of abortion providers is a common form of pro-life protest:[2] over thirteen thousand incidents were reported in 2005[3] Pro-life is a term representing a variety of perspectives and activist movements in bioethics. ...


Picketing and the law

Picketing as long as it does not cause obstruction to a highway or intimidation is legal in many countries and in line with freedom of assembly laws but many countries have restrictions on the use of picketing. Group of women holding placards with political activist slogans: know your courts - study your politicians, Liberty in law, Law makers must not be law breakers, and character in candidates photo 1920 Freedom of assembly is the freedom to associate with, or organize any groups, gatherings, clubs, or organizations that one...


In the UK the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 gives protection under civil law for pickets who are acting in connection with an industrial dispute at or near their workplace who are using their picketing to peacefully obtain or communicate information or peacefully persuading any person to work or abstain from working. However, many employers have recently taken to gaining injunctions to limit the effect of picketing outside their work place, the granting of injunctions tends to be based on the accusation of intimidation or general on peaceful behaviour and the claim that numbers of the pickers are not from the effected work place.[4] Historically, picking was banned by a Liberal government in the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1871 but then decriminalised by a Conservative government with the Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act 1875.[5] The Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 is a UK Act of Parliament which regulates the operation of trade unions and industrial action, and governs relations between employers and unions. ... An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (enjoins or restrains) a party from continuing a particular activity. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... The Criminal Law Amendment Act 1871 () is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed by W. E. Gladstones Liberal Government. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act 1875 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom relating to labour relations, which together with the Employers and Workmen Act 1875, fully decriminalised the work of trade unions. ...


In the US any strike activity was hard to organise in the early 1900s however picketing became more common after the Norris-LaGuardia Act of 1932, which limited the ability of employers to gain injunctions to stop strikes, and further legislation which supported the right to organise for the unions. Mass picketing and secondary picketing was however outlawed by the The Taft-Hartley Labor Act (1947).[6] Some kinds of pickets are constitutionally protected.[7][8] The Norris-LaGuardia Act (also known as the Anti-Injunction Bill) of 1932 was a United States federal law that outlawed yellow-dog contracts, or those in which a worker agreed as a condition of employment that he would not join a labor union; the common title followed from the... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... The Labor-Management Relations Act, commonly known as the Taft-Hartley Act, is a United States federal law that greatly restricts the activities and power of labor unions. ... Citizens of the United States often treat free speech as a fundamental right and often a matter of patriotism. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ Leedom v. Kyne and the Implementation of a National Labor Policy, James F. Wyatt III, Duke Law Journal, Vol. 1981, No. 5 (Nov., 1981), pp. 853-877
  2. ^ Picketing and harassment
  3. ^ Violence statistics
  4. ^ Picketing, The Liberty guide to human rights, 11 January 2005, Liberty
  5. ^ Timeline:1850-1880, TUC history online, Professor Mary Davis, Centre for Trade Union Studies, London Metropolitan University
  6. ^ PICKETING, The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, Columbia University Press.
  7. ^ Thornhill v. Alabama
  8. ^ Other cases cited at Free speech zone#Notable incidents and court proceedings
Organized Labour Portal

  Results from FactBites:
 
Picketing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (749 words)
Picketing is a common tactic used by trade unions during strikes, who will try to prevent dissident members of the union, members of other unions and ununionised workers from working.
Picketing as long as it does not cause obstruction to a highway or intimidation is legal in many countries and in line with freedom of assembly laws but many countries have restrictions on the use of picketing.
Mass picketing and secondary picketing was however outlawed by the The Taft-Hartley Labor Act (1947).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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