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Encyclopedia > Physical science

== Headline text ==cant there be some kind of picture somewhere so i can see by picture???? Physical science is a encompassing term for the branches of natural science, and science, that study non-living systems, in contrast to the biological sciences. However, the term "physical" creates an unintended, somewhat arbitrary distinction, since many branches of physical science also study biological phenomena. Basic physical science topics include: The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ...

  • Astronomy - the study of the universe beyond the atmosphere of the Earth
  • Chemistry - the science dealing with the composition of substances, their interactions with energy and each other
  • Many of the earth sciences, including:
    • Geology - the study of the planetary structure of Earth and the physical processes which shape it (the broader subject of planetary science studies the structure of planets other than Earth)
    • Hydrology - the study of the movement and distribution of water across the Earth's surface
    • Meteorology - the study of Earth's weather patterns and other atmospheric phenomena (the broader subject of atmospheric sciences studies the structure of atmospheres in general rather than specifically Earth's)
    • Oceanography - the study of the ocean as a physical system
    • Soil science - the study of the pedosphere
  • Physics - the quantitative science dealing with matter and energy

Contents

For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth Sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Planetary science, also known as planetology or planetary astronomy, is the science of planets, or planetary systems, and the solar system. ... Water covers 70% of the Earths surface. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Atmospheric sciences is an umbrella term for the study of the atmosphere, its processes, the effects other systems have on the atmosphere, and the effects of the atmosphere on these other systems. ... Thermohaline circulation Oceanography (from Ocean + Greek γράφειν = write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... Soil science deals with soil as a natural resource on the surface of the earth including soil formation, classification and mapping; physical, chemical, biological, and fertility properties of soils per se; and these properties in relation to the use and management of soils. ... The pedosphere is the outermost layer of the Earth that is composed of soil and subject to soil formation processes. ... This is a discussion of a present category of science. ...

Basic principles of the physical sciences

The foundations of the physical sciences rests upon key concepts and theories, each of which explains and/or models a particular aspect of the behavior of nature. As in other sciences, these key concepts and theories came to discovery using the scientific method, which must be found using scientific evidence: The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... The scientific method or process is fundamental to the scientific investigation and acquisition of new knowledge based upon physical evidence. ...


Basic principles of astronomy

Astronomy is the science of celestial bodies and their interactions in space. Its studies includes the following: For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... ... Space has been an interest for philosophers and scientists for much of human history. ...

(Note: Astronomy should not be confused with astrology, which assumes that people's destiny and human affairs in general are correlated to the apparent positions of astronomical objects in the sky -- although the two fields share a common origin, they are quite different; astronomers embrace the scientific method, while astrologers do not.) STARS can mean: Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society Special Tactics And Rescue Service, a fictional task force that appears in Capcoms Resident Evil video game franchise. ... For other uses, see Galaxy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the physics subject. ... For other uses, see Big Bang (disambiguation). ... The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ... In astronomy, heliocentrism is the theory that the Sun is at the center of the Universe and/or the Solar System. ... The geocentric model (in Greek: geo = earth and centron = centre) of the universe is a paradigm which places the Earth at its center. ... “Copernicus” redirects here. ... Heliocentric Solar System Heliocentrism (lower panel) in comparison to the geocentric model (upper panel) In astronomy, heliocentrism is the theory that the sun is at the centre of the Universe and/or the Solar System. ... This article is about the Solar System. ... A planet (from the Greek πλανήτης, planetes or wanderers) is a body of considerable mass that orbits a star and that produces very little or no energy through nuclear fusion. ... Comet Hale-Bopp, showing a white dust tail and blue gas tail (February 1997) A comet is a small astronomical object similar to an asteroid but composed largely of ice. ... 253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ... Worlds second largest Meteorite in Culiacan, Mexico A meteorite is a relatively small extra-terrestrial body that reaches the Earths surface. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Medieval artistic representation of a spherical Earth - with compartments representing earth, air, and water (c. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ...


Basic principles of chemistry

Chemistry is the science of matter mainly at the micro-level. Its studies include the following: For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... This article is about matter in physics and chemistry. ...

In chemistry and physics, atomic theory is a theory of the nature of matter, which states that matter is composed of discrete units called atoms, as opposed to obsolete beliefs that matter could be divided into any arbitrarily small quantity. ... Fig. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... Portrait of Dimitri Mendeleyev by Ilya Repin Dimitri Mendeleev (Russian: , Dimitriy Ivanovich Mendeleyev  ) (8 February [O.S. 27 January] 1834 in Tobolsk – 2 February [O.S. 20 January] 1907 in Saint Petersburg), was a Russian chemist. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements, also called the Mendeleev periodic table, is a tabular display of the known chemical elements. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... “The Periodic Table” redirects here. ... For alternative meanings see metal (disambiguation). ... Together with the metals and metalloids, a nonmetal is one of three categories of chemical elements as distinguished by ionization and bonding properties. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ... For alternative meanings see acid (disambiguation). ... Acids and bases: Acid-base reaction pH Self-ionization of water Buffer solutions Systematic naming Acid-base extraction Acidity function Proton affinity Acids: Strong acids Weak acids Superacids Lewis acids Mineral acids Organic acids Bases: Strong bases Weak bases Superbases Lewis bases Organic bases edit In chemistry, a base is... Acids and bases: Acid-base reaction theories pH Self-ionization of water Buffer solutions Systematic naming Electrochemistry Acid-base extraction Acids: Strong acids Weak acids Mineral acids Organic acids Bases: Strong bases Weak bases Organic bases edit An acid-base reaction is a chemical reaction between an acid and a... For other meanings of the word salt see table salt or salt (disambiguation). ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... Vapours of hydrogen chloride in a beaker and ammonia in a test tube meet to form a cloud of a new substance, ammonium chloride A chemical reaction is a process that results in the interconversion of chemical substances. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... In chemistry, a chemical bond is the force which holds together atoms in molecules or crystals. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Friherre Jöns Jakob Berzelius (August 20, 1779 – August 7, 1848) was a Swedish chemist. ... A chemical compound is a chemical substance formed from two or more elements, with a fixed ratio determining the composition. ... In chemistry, a chemical equation is a symbolic representation of a chemical reaction. ... Willard Gibbs - founder of chemical thermodynamics In thermodynamics, chemical thermodynamics is the mathematical study of the interrelation of heat and work with chemical reactions or with a physical change of state within the confines of the laws of thermodynamics. ... Nuclear chemistry is a subfield of chemistry dealing with radioactivity, nuclear processes and nuclear properties. ... The nucleus of an atom is the very small dense region, of positive charge, in its centre consisting of nucleons (protons and neutrons). ... Radioactive decay is the process in which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation in the form of particles or electromagnetic waves. ... Antoine Henri Becquerel (December 15, 1852 – August 25, 1908) was a French physicist, Nobel laureate, and one of the discoverers of radioactivity. ... Organic chemistry is a specific discipline within chemistry which involves the scientific study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions, and preparation (by synthesis or by other means) of chemical compounds consisting primarily of carbon and hydrogen, which may contain any number of other elements, including nitrogen, oxygen, halogens as well... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Urea is an organic compound with the chemical formula (NH2)2CO. Urea is also known as carbamide, especially in the recommended International Nonproprietary Names (rINN) in use in Europe. ... Friedrich Wöhler Friedrich Wöhler (July 31, 1800 - September 23, 1882) was a German chemist, best-known for his synthesis of urea, but also the first to isolate several of the elements. ... In chemistry, a hydrocarbon is a cleaning solution consisting only of carbon (C) and hydrogen (H). ... In organic chemistry, functional groups (or moieties) are specific groups of atoms within molecules, that are responsible for the characteristic chemical reactions of those molecules. ...

Basic principles of earth science

Earth science is the science of the planet Earth, the only known life-bearing planet. Its studies include the following: Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth Sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Earth, also known as the Earth or Terra, is the third planet outward from the Sun. ... For other uses, see Life (disambiguation). ...

For other uses, see Rock (disambiguation). ... Minerals are natural compounds formed through geological processes. ... The movement of water around, over, and through the Earth is called the water cycle. ... Transpiration is the evaporation of excess water from aerial parts and of plants, especially leaves but also stems, flowers and fruits. ... For the village on the Isle of Wight, see Freshwater, Isle of Wight. ... Surface water is water on the ground or in a stream, river, lake, sea or ocean; as opposed to groundwater. ... Groundwater is water located beneath the ground surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of lithologic formations. ... Thermohaline circulation Oceanography (from Ocean + Greek γράφειν = write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Weathering is the decomposing of rocks, soils and their minerals through direct contact with the air. ... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. For erosion as an operation of Mathematical morphology, see Erosion (morphology) Erosion is displacement of solids (soil, mud, rock and other particles) by the agents of ocean currents, wind, water, or ice by downward or down-slope movement... For other uses, see Rock (disambiguation). ... Soil science deals with soil as a natural resource on the surface of the earth including soil formation, classification and mapping; physical, chemical, biological, and fertility properties of soils per se; and these properties in relation to the use and management of soils. ... ... Surface of the Earth Geomorphology is the study of landforms, including their origin and evolution, and the processes that shape them. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Seismology (from the Greek seismos = earthquake and logos = word) is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth. ... Mount Cook, a mountain in New Zealand A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... A fossil Ammonite Fossils are the mineralized remains of animals or plants or other traces such as footprints. ... Atmospheric sciences is an umbrella term for the study of the atmosphere, its processes, the effects other systems have on the atmosphere, and the effects of the atmosphere on these other systems. ... Diurnal (daily) rhythm of air pressure in northern Germany (black curve is air pressure) Atmospheric pressure is the pressure at any point in the Earths atmosphere. ... For the 1928 film, see The Wind. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Condensation (disambiguation). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Golden Gate Bridge in Fog Evening fog obscures Londons Tower Bridge from passers by. ... This article is about clouds in meteorology. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... Climatology is the study of climate, scientifically defined as weather conditions averaged over a period of time,[1] and is a branch of the atmospheric sciences. ... Water covers 70% of the Earths surface. ... This article is about clouds in meteorology. ... Air mass - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Image:NWS weather fronts. ... For other uses, see Thunderstorm (disambiguation). ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... For other uses, see Climate (disambiguation). ...

Basic principles of physics

Physics is the "fundamental science" because the other natural sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, etc.) deal with systems that obey the laws of physics. The physical laws of matter, energy, and the forces of nature govern the interactions between particles (such as molecules, atoms, or subatomic particles). Some basic principles of physics are: This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article is about matter in physics and chemistry. ... A fundamental interaction is a mechanism by which particles interact with each other, and which cannot be explained by another more fundamental interaction. ... Interaction is a kind of action that occurs as two or more objects have an effect upon one another. ... In science, a molecule is the smallest particle of a pure chemical substance that still retains its chemical composition and properties. ... Properties For alternative meanings see atom (disambiguation). ... A subatomic particle is a particle smaller than an atom: it may be elementary or composite. ...

This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Newtons First and Second laws, in Latin, from the original 1687 edition of the Principia Mathematica. ... In physics, force is anything that can cause a massive body to accelerate. ... For other uses, see Weight (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In classical mechanics, momentum (pl. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... In physics, mechanical work is the amount of energy transferred by a force. ... In physics, power (symbol: P) is the rate at which work is performed or energy is transferred. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In physics, the conservation of energy states that the total amount of energy in an isolated system remains constant, although it may change forms, e. ... In physics and engineering, energy conversion is any process of converting energy from one form to another. ... Energy development is the ongoing effort to provide abundant and accessible energy through knowledge, skills, and constructions. ... Kinetic theory or kinetic theory of gases attempts to explain macroscopic properties of gases, such as pressure, temperature, or volume, by considering their molecular composition and motion. ... In the physical sciences, a phase is a set of states of a macroscopic physical system that have relatively uniform chemical composition and physical properties (i. ... In its most common usage, the term phase change indicates that a substance has changed among the three classical phases of matter: solid, liquid and gas. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that List of temperature sensors be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... Heat conduction or thermal conduction is the spontaneous transfer of thermal energy through matter, from a region of higher temperature to a region of lower temperature, and hence acts to even out temperature differences. ... Convection in the most general terms refers to the internal movement of currents within fluids (i. ... “Radiant heat” redirects here. ... The laws of thermodynamics, in principle, describe the specifics for the transport of heat and work in thermodynamic processes. ... A WAVES Photographer 3rd Class The WAVES were a World War II era division of the U.S. Navy that consisted entirely of women. ... Sound is a disturbance of mechanical energy that propagates through matter as a wave. ... For other uses, see Electricity (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see magnetism (disambiguation). ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Notable physical scientists

also;; i would like to add who knows careers that involve physical science please help me!!! (: (September 15, 973 in Kath, Khwarezm – December 13, 1048 in Ghazni) was a Persian[1][2][3] Muslim polymath[4] of the 11th century, whose experiments and discoveries were as significant and diverse as those of Leonardo da Vinci or Galileo, five hundred years before the Renaissance; al-Biruni was... This article is about the Persian people, an ethnic group found mainly in Iran. ... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... Geodetic pillar (1855); Ostend, Belgium Archive with lithography plates for maps of Bavaria in the Landesamt für Vermessung und Geoinformation in Munich Geodesy (IPA North American English ; British, Australian English etc. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... (Arabic: أبو علي الحسن بن الحسن بن الهيثم, Latinized: Alhacen or (deprecated) Alhazen) (965 – 1039), was an Arab[1] or Persian[2] Iraqi Muslim polymath[3][4] who made significant contributions to the principles of optics, as well as to anatomy, astronomy, engineering, mathematics, medicine, ophthalmology, philosophy, physics, psychology, visual perception, and to science in general with... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... The title page of a 1572 Latin manuscript of Ibn al-Haythams Book of Optics The Book of Optics (Arabic: Kitab al-Manazir, Latin: De Aspectibus or Perspectiva) was a seven volume treatise on optics written by the Iraqi Muslim scientist Ibn al-Haytham (Latinized as Alhacen or Alhazen... For the book by Sir Isaac Newton, see Opticks. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Archimedes of Syracuse (Greek: c. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Statics is the branch of physics concerned with physical systems in static equilibrium, that is, in a state where the relative positions of subsystems do not vary over time, or where components and structures are at rest under the action of external forces of equilibrium. ... In physics, buoyancy is the upward force on an object produced by the surrounding fluid (i. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around nine hundred years. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... In philosophy generally, empiricism is a theory of knowledge emphasizing the role of experience in the formation of ideas, while discounting the notion of innate ideas. ... Intuition is an unconscious form of knowledge. ... Faith has two general implications which can be implied either exclusively or mutually; To Trust: Believing a certain variable will act a specific way despite the potential influence of known or unknown change. ... Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of IUCAA, Pune. ... Āryabhatīya, an astronomical treastise, is the Magnum Opus and only extant work of the 5th century Indian Mathematician, Aryabhatta. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans, KC (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English astrologer, philosopher, statesman, spy, freemason and essayist. ... The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... The Baconian method is the investigative method developed by Francis Bacon. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... Robert Boyle (25 January 1627 – 30 December 1691) was an Irish natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, inventor, and early gentleman scientist, noted for his work in physics and chemistry. ... Natural philosophy is a term applied to the objective study of nature and the physical universe before the development of modern science. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... Boyles law (sometimes referred to as the Boyle-Mariotte law) is one of the gas laws and basis of derivation for the Ideal gas law, which describes relationship between the product pressure and volume within a closed system as constant when temperature remains at a fixed measure; both entities... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... “Copernicus” redirects here. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... In astronomy, heliocentrism is the theory that the Sun is at the center of the Universe and/or the Solar System. ... Sol redirects here. ... This article is about the Solar System. ... This article is about the chemist and physicist. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... Pierre Curie (Paris, France, May 15, 1859 – April 19, 1906, Paris) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity and radioactivity. ... General Name, Symbol, Number polonium, Po, 84 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 16, 6, p Appearance silvery Standard atomic weight (209) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Xe] 4f14 5d10 6s2 6p4 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 6 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ... General Name, Symbol, Number radium, Ra, 88 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 7, s Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight (226) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Leonhard Paul Euler (pronounced Oiler; IPA ) (April 15, 1707 – September 18 [O.S. September 7] 1783) was a pioneering Swiss mathematician and physicist, who spent most of his life in Russia and Germany. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... In fluid dynamics, the Euler equations govern the compressible, Inviscid flow. ... Galileo can refer to: Galileo Galilei, astronomer, philosopher, and physicist (1564 - 1642) the Galileo spacecraft, a NASA space probe that visited Jupiter and its moons the Galileo positioning system Life of Galileo, a play by Bertolt Brecht Galileo (1975) - screen adaptation of the play Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a person whose area of interest is astronomy or astrophysics. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Galileo can refer to: Galileo Galilei, astronomer, philosopher, and physicist (1564 - 1642) the Galileo spacecraft, a NASA space probe that visited Jupiter and its moons the Galileo positioning system Life of Galileo, a play by Bertolt Brecht Galileo (1975) - screen adaptation of the play Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... For other uses, see Mechanic (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Jabir ibn Hayyan and Geber were also pen names of an anonymous 14th century Spanish alchemist: see Pseudo-Geber. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: , arabi) is a member of a complexly defined ethnic group who identifies as such on the basis of one or more of either genealogical, political, or linguistic grounds. ... Alchemy in Islam differs from the general alchemy in certain ways, one of which is that Muslim alchemists didnt believe in the creation of life in the laboratory. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... In the scientific method, an experiment (Latin: ex- periri, of (or from) trying) is a set of observations performed in the context of solving a particular problem or question, to support or falsify a hypothesis or research concerning phenomena. ... James Hutton, painted by Abner Lowe. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... The Geologist by Carl Spitzweg A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... Uniformitarianism has had two separate meanings, both more prevalent in 19th-century discourse: Within religious philosophy, Uniformitarianism (with a capital U) is the belief that the Universe has existed as it is now for an infinite time and will continue to exist for ever. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... In the article vector quantities are written in bold whereas scalar ones are in italics. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gravity. ... Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American quantum chemist and biochemist. ... Quantum chemistry is a branch of theoretical chemistry, which applies quantum mechanics and quantum field theory to address issues and problems in chemistry. ... Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Fig. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Thales of Miletos (, ca. ... Pre-Socratic philosophers are often very hard to pin down, and it is sometimes very difficult to determine the actual line of argument they used in supporting their particular views. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Naturalism is any of several philosophical stances, typically those descended from materialism and pragmatism, that do not distinguish the supernatural (including strange entities like non-natural values, and universals as they are commonly conceived) from nature. ... Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Physical science - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1146 words)
Physical science is an encompassing term for the branches of natural science, and science (generally), that study non-living systems, in contrast to the biological sciences.
Natural sciences generally, and physical sciences particularly, tend to be more reductionist sciences, in contrast to the more holistic social sciences; i.e., physical science tends to explain the whole system from the system's fundamental parts, whereas social science tends to explain the whole system as more than the mere sum of its fundamental parts.
Physics is the science of nature in the broadest sense, dealing with the fundamentals of matter, energy, and the forces of nature governing the interactions between particles (such as molecules, atoms, or subatomic particles).
Physical Science (2019 words)
The Physical Science curriculum is designed to continue the investigation of the physical sciences begun in earlier grades.
Physical science is rich in examples of science as a human endeavor, historical perspectives on the development of scientific understanding, and the nature and role of science.
Although original student research is often relegated to a yearly science fair project, continuing student involvement in research contributes immensely to their understanding of the process of science and to their problem-solving abilities.
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